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Just to add to this, it also depends on the quality of noise dampening that Rivian is able to achieve. We swapped road tires for all terrains on our Lexus GX and if I roll the window down there is some slight noise, but cruising at 70 with the windows up you hear nothing different because the Lexus noise dampening is so solid on those trucks.

By the way, I’m new here (first post) and just reserved the R1S last week (Adventure, White (may change to green), white interior, 20” AT) and looking forward to getting to know everyone here!

First kid is on the way so upgrading one of our vehicles to something larger (keeping the GX which we love but which is also a premium gas hog) and have been EV shopping but couldn’t find anything that I thought looked great and could also pull our boat. Had seen Rivian stuff online occasionally but never paid much attention until last week. Fell in love with the R1S design (not to mention the price compared to the $75k Tahoes and $100k Range Rovers that were starting to tempt us when we couldn’t find the right EV) and placed a deposit the same day!
Thank you @RoadWarrior ! I am betting the noise dampening will be good since they are targeting a luxury segment. Not sure if people here know anything about it, but I would also imagine that the battery in the bottom of the car should help a lot with noise.
 

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I have 22 inch rims on my Denali and I'd recommend going 20 inch...the reason is that more rubber is a more comfortable ride. Even with electromagnetic ride control, the 22 inch rims don't feel good compared to my buddy's 20 inch...

I'll be ordering a Rivian in the next day or two and will go with the 20 inch all terrain. It's not like I'm going to off-road this vehicle, but for aesthetics and function, the 20 inch rims are the way to go...JMHO...
Congrats on your future purchase. I'm one of the initial November 2018 preorder customers who will have been waiting for almost 3 years by the time I get my Rivian. I've been tracking them for years and am very excited to finally get my Rivian this year.

Back on subject, I think another thing for everyone needs to keep in mind is not just the ride difference of a low profile tire on a larger wheel, but also the impact of large wheels to electric vehicles.

I am a long time owner of Tesla Model S and can tell you that when we went from the 18" wheels to the 21" wheels, we did see a noticeable impact to overall distance. The bigger the wheel, the heavier the wheel. The heavier the wheel, the more rolling resistance. The more rolling resistance the less distance you will get from a single charge. The width of the tire also can impact rolling resistance and bigger wheels often have wider tires.

For an experienced fully electric vehicle owner, I know that this impact will occur and that I'll just adjust my driving plans without issue. I'm already comfortable with that fact that the distance that is defined by the vehicle at the beginning of a trip often can be inaccurate due to many factors like weather, speed, load, etc. and so we mentally plan for variance in our trips. We don't push the distance before charging and never attempt to make a distance that is close to the vehicles capacity. I also know that the ranges provided by manufacturers are established with average variables.

However, when we got our first electric vehicle, we definitely went through some range anxiety thinking we would have enough battery to make our destination and all the sudden we would realize we weren't going to make it. We would have to quickly figure out how to get to a charger, which wasn't always close.

Today there are WAY more chargers available than 5 years ago, so range anxiety is nothing like it was.

Everyone keep in mind that you will get less distance with those larger heavier wheels and tires.
 

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I'm going with the free 22" option with the R1S, but I'm going to be changing out the wheels. I'm simply after the more expensive 22" tires. I'm not a fan of any of their wheel designs, and will be replacing with a nice 22" aftermarket wheel shortly after getting my R1S. By doing this, I won't need to be new tires also.
Which aftermarket wheels are you looking to get instead? Any particular brands/models?
 

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Congrats on your future purchase. I'm one of the initial November 2018 preorder customers who will have been waiting for almost 3 years by the time I get my Rivian. I've been tracking them for years and am very excited to finally get my Rivian this year.

Back on subject, I think another thing for everyone needs to keep in mind is not just the ride difference of a low profile tire on a larger wheel, but also the impact of large wheels to electric vehicles.

I am a long time owner of Tesla Model S and can tell you that when we went from the 18" wheels to the 21" wheels, we did see a noticeable impact to overall distance. The bigger the wheel, the heavier the wheel. The heavier the wheel, the more rolling resistance. The more rolling resistance the less distance you will get from a single charge. The width of the tire also can impact rolling resistance and bigger wheels often have wider tires.

For an experienced fully electric vehicle owner, I know that this impact will occur and that I'll just adjust my driving plans without issue. I'm already comfortable with that fact that the distance that is defined by the vehicle at the beginning of a trip often can be inaccurate due to many factors like weather, speed, load, etc. and so we mentally plan for variance in our trips. We don't push the distance before charging and never attempt to make a distance that is close to the vehicles capacity. I also know that the ranges provided by manufacturers are established with average variables.

However, when we got our first electric vehicle, we definitely went through some range anxiety thinking we would have enough battery to make our destination and all the sudden we would realize we weren't going to make it. We would have to quickly figure out how to get to a charger, which wasn't always close.

Today there are WAY more chargers available than 5 years ago, so range anxiety is nothing like it was.

Everyone keep in mind that you will get less distance with those larger heavier wheels and tires.
Driving style makes a big difference on range as well. I reset one of the trip meters on our Model S when my wife started driving it to work. When I was the primary driver the car was average 320 watts per mile. With my wife driving, it is doing 295 watts per mile.

Pretty sure it is not that she is much lighter than I am and has more to do with my right foot seems to be much heavier....
 

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I'm going with the free 22" option with the R1S, but I'm going to be changing out the wheels. I'm simply after the more expensive 22" tires. I'm not a fan of any of their wheel designs, and will be replacing with a nice 22" aftermarket wheel shortly after getting my R1S. By doing this, I won't need to be new tires also.
Have you found any aftermarket wheels you really like for the R1S?
 

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Which aftermarket wheels are you looking to get instead? Any particular brands/models?
I haven't gotten that far with it. I'm not really going to be focused on a brand as much as look and weight of the rim. For me, I'm not going to be doing a lot of off-roading (The I feel I'm going to have to do tank mode at least once). I got the SUV for travel and convenience. I don't need a strong off-road wheel, I want a light fashionable wheel.
 

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Driving style makes a big difference on range as well. I reset one of the trip meters on our Model S when my wife started driving it to work. When I was the primary driver the car was average 320 watts per mile. With my wife driving, it is doing 295 watts per mile.

Pretty sure it is not that she is much lighter than I am and has more to do with my right foot seems to be much heavier....
LOL I COMPLETELY Agree. My wife always gets better 'mileage' than me. I definitely enjoy that power of the electric car in acceleration and drive faster including setting self driving at higher speeds (which electric cars of course are the opposite of gas, the faster speeds burn more electricity while city driving burns less). That is why I noted 'speed' as one of my variables.

I LOVE to burn electricity. :)
 

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Thanks for the tip. I don't plan to do anything crazy since I have never done off-road before. But some are easy and good to do with family. So why not try it? If I like then I may get a Jeep to do the hard ones.

This one is about 2 hours from my house and seems easy enough:

Flagpole Knob
True, there are different levels of off-roading...if you're going bumpy, wet and fun, all is good...if you're going highly technical, I'd go with the Jeep! :)
 

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Congrats on your future purchase. I'm one of the initial November 2018 preorder customers who will have been waiting for almost 3 years by the time I get my Rivian. I've been tracking them for years and am very excited to finally get my Rivian this year.

Back on subject, I think another thing for everyone needs to keep in mind is not just the ride difference of a low profile tire on a larger wheel, but also the impact of large wheels to electric vehicles.

I am a long time owner of Tesla Model S and can tell you that when we went from the 18" wheels to the 21" wheels, we did see a noticeable impact to overall distance. The bigger the wheel, the heavier the wheel. The heavier the wheel, the more rolling resistance. The more rolling resistance the less distance you will get from a single charge. The width of the tire also can impact rolling resistance and bigger wheels often have wider tires.

For an experienced fully electric vehicle owner, I know that this impact will occur and that I'll just adjust my driving plans without issue. I'm already comfortable with that fact that the distance that is defined by the vehicle at the beginning of a trip often can be inaccurate due to many factors like weather, speed, load, etc. and so we mentally plan for variance in our trips. We don't push the distance before charging and never attempt to make a distance that is close to the vehicles capacity. I also know that the ranges provided by manufacturers are established with average variables.

However, when we got our first electric vehicle, we definitely went through some range anxiety thinking we would have enough battery to make our destination and all the sudden we would realize we weren't going to make it. We would have to quickly figure out how to get to a charger, which wasn't always close.

Today there are WAY more chargers available than 5 years ago, so range anxiety is nothing like it was.

Everyone keep in mind that you will get less distance with those larger heavier wheels and tires.
Thank you for the great points....and I'm excited for you to get your Rivian.

I went with the 20 inch All-terrain as I will be on some soccer practice fields, curbs, etc...which tires did you go with? I realize the all-terrain are not as good as road tires for highway speed, but I do like the utility of them. Certainly, a 20 inch wheel should be better than the 22 for general use/economy. Comfort is definitely better with the 20.
 

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My two cents...if you want to off-road a lot, get a cheap old Jeep. Not many will be seriously off-roading an 80k vehicle...the Hummer EV SUV goes over 100k in price...I'd think someone foolish if they were to scratch the heck out of the thing doing technical off-roading...sure, the vehicle is built for it, but the paint never is....:)
Headed straight to Mosquito Pass - Alma to Leadville...gonna put it to the test
 

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I've never met a Pirelli tire I wasn't excited to take off my car. I've found that the first 5,000 miles are good and then performance (noise, wear, handling) degrades fast.
I ordered 22" just for the looks.
 

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Odd to me that the same wheel that’s a free LE upgrade on the R1S is $1800 extra on the LE R1T and vice versa. Hopefully they change that, but maybe they look at it as “if so many people are asking for it, then we’ll make them pay for it”. Certainly in their rights to do that.

I also noticed that the 20” black wheel option for the R1T is the same style as the 20” std wheel on the R1S, but black vs silver. The std 20” on the R1T is a different design altogether.

I’m still undecided on which wheels I will get on my R1T. It will greatly depend on the exterior color, which is still undecided as well. With most body colors I prefer the black 20” wheels, but I’m not keen on paying $3500 extra for them. I may just get the std 20” and get them powder coated if I want black.
I believe getting the AT tires on on S also includes additional undercarriage protection and maybe a couple other minor things.
 

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I believe getting the AT tires on on S also includes additional undercarriage protection and maybe a couple other minor things.
I wouldn’t assume that. I think the wheel upgrade get you different wheels and tires and that’s it. The extra protection underneath comes with the Adventure Package. It’s not clear whether it will be available as a separate option on the Explore Package or not.


  • Off-Road Upgrade with reinforced underbody shield, dual front bumper tow hooks and air compressor
 

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I wouldn’t assume that. I think the wheel upgrade get you different wheels and tires and that’s it. The extra protection underneath comes with the Adventure Package. It’s not clear whether it will be available as a separate option on the Explore Package or not.


  • Off-Road Upgrade with reinforced underbody shield, dual front bumper tow hooks and air compressor
It is in the configuration for 2K on the explorer R1S
 

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It's been discussed before here a bit...but are we all in agreement that 20 inch rims will be more comfortable feeling on the road (and off road) and offer more miles per charge vs. 22 inch rims? I thought larger rims on an ICE would yield more mpg as it's more distance per turn, but I'm not sure in an EV if the extra energy to move them plays in?
 

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It's been discussed before here a bit...but are we all in agreement that 20 inch rims will be more comfortable feeling on the road (and off road) and offer more miles per charge vs. 22 inch rims? I thought larger rims on an ICE would yield more mpg as it's more distance per turn, but I'm not sure in an EV if the extra energy to move them plays in?
That is the normal thought, the larger sidewall the more comfort.

Personally I never really noticed the difference in comfort as much.

I put 19s on a mini cooper and 24s on a Tahoe, never really felt the ride comfort difference but handling on the road was a major improvement with the smaller sidewalls. I also saw a negative impact on gas consumption on both but not as much as I actually was anticipating it to be.

I'm getting the 22s on the R1S as I am on pavement 90% of the time and want the handling that they should provide.
 

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It's been discussed before here a bit...but are we all in agreement that 20 inch rims will be more comfortable feeling on the road (and off road) and offer more miles per charge vs. 22 inch rims? I thought larger rims on an ICE would yield more mpg as it's more distance per turn, but I'm not sure in an EV if the extra energy to move them plays in?
20” will be a softer ride. They’ve stated the 21” will be the most efficient, but to my knowledge haven’t stated whether the 22” or 20” are more or less efficient than the other. They have said the 22” are “grippier”, meaning higher rolling resistance and less efficient, both whether the aggressive AT tread of the 20} is even less efficient than that is unknown. Good chance it will be.

Rim size has nothing to do with rotations per mile. That’s a factor of the outside dimension of the tire. The 20” is the largest of the three by 1.2” OD. I think the weight of the wheel and tire combined and the rolling resistance will impact efficient more than tire size.
 
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