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I configured my r1s with 22” rims, but the weather was nicer when I did that. Now that snow is coming, I’m second guessing the wheel/tire choice.

Any thoughts on if the 22s should be fine for a Cleveland winter?

Thanks!
 

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22’s are completely pointless. Even 20’s are pointless on a truck. That said it says the 22 comes with a “performance all season” so you could use them in the winter, but they wouldn’t be close to the best set up for winter. I’ll add though that in a 22 tire options will be limited and performance all seasons will not last long in a big, heavy, high powered truck. I would guess 10k miles at best unless you drive very conservative. My wife went through a set of 4 tires before her first oil change (at 10k miles) when she had a Cayenne Turbo with performance all seasons.

Interestingly they do make Nokian Hakka 9 in a 275/50-22, but not sure if I’m a high enough load rating for how heavy the rivian is and highly doubt you would want to run studs in OH.

For best performance, for the most part you should run the smallest rims that fit over your brakes. I really hope the rivian will fit a18” or even a 17” rim.
 

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They are a street oriented tire designed more for performance. Likely not be best in the snow or off-road.

I had the good fortune of being able to see it in person and the first mile event last week. I originally thought I wanted the 22's as well, but I'm in SoCal. Was still on the fence, but was leaning more towards the 20's. Then, when I saw it in person, absolutely clinched it. For me personally, being that this is not a big truck, the 22's looked too big for the size of vehicle it is. 22's fit well on a Cadillac Escalade or other very large vehicle. Having been able to see the two side by side, the 20's just naturally fit the vehicle so much better. Again, based on my personal taste. I like big wheels normally, but in this case, they were too big for the vehicle. Plus, being an adventure type of vehicle, while it has the performance capabilities of most sports cars, is still a truck and the all-terrain tire setup with some more rubber just seemed to fit the vehicle better. This all being based on aesthetics. For your case, if you're in snow each winter, would have to consider a second set. I did that as well. Was going to get one for travelling and another set of 20's for off-roading trips. But now, happy to just go with the 20's. No desire for the 22's anymore.

In the 0-60 run, the 20's slipped just a little. With the 22's, it likely wouldn't slip the tires at all and would perform just slightly better in 0-60 time. So, if that's something important to you, then that would be a reason to consider the 22's. But otherwise, even with the 20's, it's still very quick off the line.
 

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20’s with the correct tires will be faster 0-60, 1/4 mile, and on a track then 22’s. 18’s would be even faster. Larger rims are only for subjective looks. On the road They slow acceleration, lengthen braking distance and hinder handling due to more rotational mass. The only reason on a track car to get larger rims is if you need larger brakes. Off road you want as much sidewall as possible, even the 20” rims with 34’s wil only have a 8” sidewall at best which is considered as the absolute minimum for and technical off roading that you would need AT tires for.

when F1 was switching from 15” to 18” as their standard wheel size the cars got slower around the track.
 

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I would not want to cut corners with tires in the snow on a truck that tips the scales near 7000lbs. A set of snow tires is less expensive than fixing even a small dent on a vehicle like this. Performance oriented tires have softer rubber compounds that tend to get really hard when it's cold out. They also have tread designed for handling on pavement and not snow/ice.

The stock tires on the 20" wheels carry the severe service logo and are snow rated. I wouldn't call them dedicated snow tires but they meet certain minimum standard for snow/slush clearing and the rubber will stay pliable in cold temps. They'll be significantly better in the snow than the performance option.
 

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I run 20s with Pirelli Scorpion all season on my current truck. We do not get a lot of snow, but when we do they are just fine. Are they as good as all- terrains, no, but they are fine. They are all season tires, not to be confused with a warm weather performance tire.

I would assume if he looking at the 20s he is not considering off roading with them.

Also, 10k miles at best for the 22s, you have to be kidding me.
 

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I would also go with the smallest rims (20's) and would also start by trying the AT's with the Severe Weather Rating that have been purpose-built for the vehicle.

That said, if you are constantly battling ice and snow on HWY's, drive steep or windy country roads in winter, live or drive to or through ski country, then it would make sense to either have a dedicated set of winter rims + dedicated snow tires, or mount snows on the 20's then swap back to the AT's in April or May. Your tires are going to wear. If you have dedicated snows, you aren't paying more because you will extend the life of your summer tires - you are just investing in a far better driving experience and adding more safety & control.

If you have never run a true winter tire (not all-seasons) you will likely never want to go back to 1 tire for year round use (at least in zones with climates that could be challenging in winter)
 

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I configured my r1s with 22” rims, but the weather was nicer when I did that. Now that snow is coming, I’m second guessing the wheel/tire choice.

Any thoughts on if the 22s should be fine for a Cleveland winter?

Thanks!
Rivian did their Winter testing in this video in upper MN with 21" & 22" tires. Growing up in WI, I think either will be fine.

 

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Rivian did their Winter testing in this video in upper MN with 21" & 22" tires. Growing up in WI, I think either will be fine.

I totally agree. If you are not planning to off-road there is no real reason to get the all-terrain tire, unless you want the aesth
etic. More rolling resistance, less mileage , will likely wear the quickest
 

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Rivian did their Winter testing in this video in upper MN with 21" & 22" tires. Growing up in WI, I think either will be fine.
To be fair, that isn't entirely accurate, as they tested all tires and the white truck was running 20's and AT's, and the winter testing was much more focused on battery and overall system performance from what was seen in the video. With the vehicle being heavy and with 4 motors and vectoring, it should be at a great advantage with all tires. However, if you are truly in a winter service "zone" and if you were to run a traction test, I'm putting all of my $$$$ on the 20's to perform (meaning turning and stopping) at a much higher level than the other tires. Just my 02. cents.

To your point if you are just driving around on roads and treated surfaces and have fairly flat and level terrain, AT's or Winter Tires may not be necessary.
 

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I don't live there. I have no clue what types of roads he rides on or what he does on the weekend or if he has a cabin on a hill that gets 10 feet of lake effect snow. No clue. Just giving considerations for where you might consider severe service rated tires or snows.
 

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To be fair, that isn't entirely accurate, as they tested all tires and the white truck was running 20's and AT's, and the winter testing was much more focused on battery and overall system performance from what was seen in the video. With the vehicle being heavy and with 4 motors and vectoring, it should be at a great advantage with all tires. However, if you are truly in a winter service "zone" and if you were to run a traction test, I'm putting all of my $$$$ on the 20's to perform (meaning turning and stopping) at a much higher level than the other tires. Just my 02. cents.

To your point if you are just driving around on roads and treated surfaces and have fairly flat and level terrain, AT's or Winter Tires may not be necessary.
Where is there a "White" R1T in this video with 20" AT? The Blue R1T has 21" & the Camo R1T has 22"s. To each his own, but the AT are really unnecessary unless you are off-roading which 95% of truck and SUV owners never do.
 

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To be fair, that isn't entirely accurate, as they tested all tires and the white truck was running 20's and AT's, and the winter testing was much more focused on battery and overall system performance from what was seen in the video. With the vehicle being heavy and with 4 motors and vectoring, it should be at a great advantage with all tires. However, if you are truly in a winter service "zone" and if you were to run a traction test, I'm putting all of my $$$$ on the 20's to perform (meaning turning and stopping) at a much higher level than the other tires. Just my 02. cents.

To your point if you are just driving around on roads and treated surfaces and have fairly flat and level terrain, AT's or Winter Tires may not be necessary.
At those temps -20’sF. No way they were running the HP all season on the 21 or 22. Given the way the truck was tracking while driving I would bet they were running dedicated winter tires (not a snowflake AT). At -20F anything but a true winter tire is a brick.

here in Alaska on my LX I run ATs for my summer tires, Used to have KO2s now running wildpeaks. I’ve run Nokian Hakkas in the winter on all our vehicles for about 15 years.
 

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At those temps -20’sF. No way they were running the HP all season on the 21 or 22. Given the way the truck was tracking while driving I would bet they were running dedicated winter tires (not a snowflake AT). At -20F anything but a true winter tire is a brick.

here in Alaska on my LX I run ATs for my summer tires, Used to have KO2s now running wildpeaks. I’ve run Nokian Hakkas in the winter on all our vehicles for about 15 years.
That is pretty presumptuous to assume they were running all terrain tires on the same 22s that they have all season tires on. I would say you are likely incorrect and imparting your own bias. I mean you are also telling someone they won't get more than 10k miles out of the all season tires. Since all terrain tires typically wear faster, what do you expect to get out of the all terrain tires? 5k ?
 

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My impression from the video was that they tested "all tires" (as they state and show in the videos), but the tests weren't traditional severe service tires tests specifically... They did a lot of drifting around and didn't get into any specifics on tire performance... Traction indicated was more a reflection of 4 motors and heavy weights. I don't see a lot of starting and stopping, or clean cornering thats for sure. Either way, this will be a very capable vehicle in terms of having 4 independent motors. With the weight, I would imagine ALL tires will have to have some degree of faster degradation.
 

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That is pretty presumptuous to assume they were running all terrain tires on the same 22s that they have all season tires on. I would say you are likely incorrect and imparting your own bias. I mean you are also telling someone they won't get more than 10k miles out of the all season tires. Since all terrain tires typically wear faster, what do you expect to get out of the all terrain tires? 5k ?
AT tires do last longer then high performance all seasons. They have more ply’s (8-10 vs 4-6), a harder compound, and deeper lugs. On my LX570 I got 15k miles out of the OEM dunlops and 40k miles out of a set of AT KO2s. I tow a lot but the LX drives like a big lumbering elephant, so there is not fast starts/stops/cornering.

If you have never driven a high powered (as in >500 hp) AWD vehicle? If not you have no idea how fast they go through tires. Our cayenne turbo was 450 hp (just over half the Rivian). My wife went through the first set of tires (pirelli) in ~8-9k miles. When I had my 996 turbo would go through rear tires in 8-10k and front in 15k miles. The Tesla forums are full of people complaining about very short tire life out of the P cars that come with HP tires.
they are putting “zeros” on the 22’s. Very soft rubber.
 

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It’s not that 22” wheels are bad in snow - it’s that there are very few snows that will fit on 22’s. My experience based on 40 years living in Colorado is that a dedicated snow is the only way to go - all seasons are crap in snow, and all terrains weren’t made for dedicated snow driving. The best snows - IMO - are Nokian Hakkepelitas - incredible traction on snow and ice and drive decent on pavement. I have two Range Rover Sports - a 17’ and a ‘12 - and I run Cooper Zeon all terrains on 20’s on the ‘12 and Nokians in the Winter. On the ‘17 - which came with 22s I bought dedicated 20’s to run Nokians in the Winter. I do not take the ‘17 off road much because the sidewalls on the 22’s don’t offer much protection and I can’t get decent all terrains in 22”s.

I ordered my RT1 with the 20’s.
 
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