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If snow is your main concern, I’d go with snow tires vs AT. They are quite different. If you’re needing to go offroad (all terrain), then I’d rethink 22’s.
 

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^^^ what they said. I’ve always run AT’s as my summer tire. Most are marginal at best in the winter. Can be OK in snow, all suck on ice.

Why all the posts on here about ATs on 22’s? There is no where you could take these we trucks on 22’s (or I’d even argue 20’s) that will dictate an AT tire. EVs are more efficient and much more effected by external forces the ICEs. Putting on AT tires will give you higher consumption (less range), worse on road performance, harsher/louder ride,…

If you live in an area with a mild winter that dosn’t make a dedicated winter tire practical Look for a all seasonhighway tire with good Sipping. Use the Michelin defender LTX as a reference point.
It comes in 275/50-22
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Understand the viewpoints above. To add some color to why I'm looking for AT's on 22s

1) I like the look of the 20"s on the truck but think for the R1S (my order) the 22s just look WAY better
2) We have access to a local mountain that we frequently go up. It requires 3PMSF rated tires or snow chains to go up. It's usually not too crazy up there and the roads are paved, so I wanted to find the most "summer" oriented tire with 3PMSF and not have to deal with switching tires every season for a few trips a year. With little kiddos in the back, I'd really REALLY like to avoid having to deal with chains. Almost would deter me not to even go up the mountain.

So understand the hit on range and ride, but for convenience am considering if there's even any options for me in the 22s
 

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Understand the viewpoints above. To add some color to why I'm looking for AT's on 22s

1) I like the look of the 20"s on the truck but think for the R1S (my order) the 22s just look WAY better
2) We have access to a local mountain that we frequently go up. It requires 3PMSF rated tires or snow chains to go up. It's usually not too crazy up there and the roads are paved, so I wanted to find the most "summer" oriented tire with 3PMSF and not have to deal with switching tires every season for a few trips a year. With little kiddos in the back, I'd really REALLY like to avoid having to deal with chains. Almost would deter me not to even go up the mountain.

So understand the hit on range and ride, but for convenience am considering if there's even any options for me in the 22s
I’ve never herd of requiring 3PMSF, are you sure it isn’t a M+S requirement? Where are you talking about? And to be honest 3PMSF is sort of meaningless. There are pretty good all seasons like the defender that do not have the 3PMSF. I’ll also say that the Rivian is going to be a fairly marginal winter vehicle because it is heavy, the best winter vehicles are light. Going won’t be an issue, stopping could be. At 7k lbs it is close to the weight of my built out LX570, even on the best winter tires (studded Nokian Hakkas) I drive one of the other cars (MB 4matic, Subaru, Tesla 3) here in Alaska most of the winter and when the roads are really bad. So you may end up putting chains on anyway.

I run KO2’s as my current summer tire. It is 3PMSF and is awful on winter roads. I’ve been caught a few times with blizzards in September before the October 1 date to allow studs and the KO2s are white knuckle compadres to my Hakkas.

Also the 22’s over the 20 will increase your stopping distance and decrease cornering grip.

If you insist on 22’s look at all weathers instead of ATs. Looks like grabber APT and Cooper AT3s both come in a 22.

And they make Nokian WR G4 in a size that would fit the 20. This is probably the best all weather year round tire made. I ran a similar tire year round when we spent 2 years in the Appalachians and drove up and down Beech mountain almost every weekend in the winter in my A6 Allroad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I’ve never herd of requiring 3PMSF, are you sure it isn’t a M+S requirement? Where are you talking about? And to be honest 3PMSF is sort of meaningless. There are pretty good all seasons like the defender that do not have the 3PMSF. I’ll also say that the Rivian is going to be a fairly marginal winter vehicle because it is heavy, the best winter vehicles are light. Going won’t be an issue, stopping could be. At 7k lbs it is close to the weight of my built out LX570, even on the best winter tires (studded Nokian Hakkas) I drive one of the other cars (MB 4matic, Subaru, Tesla 3) here in Alaska most of the winter and when the roads are really bad. So you may end up putting chains on anyway.


And they make Nokian WR G4 in a size that would fit the 20. This is probably the best all weather year round tire made. I ran a similar tire year round when we spent 2 years in the Appalachians and drove up and down Beech mountain almost every weekend in the winter in my A6 Allroad.
I live in SoCal, so most of my driving will be pavement and in warm weather. The local mountain here during the winter does require 3PMSF and not just M+S, and stopping on the side of the road just to throw chains on is really not worth the hassle since I never go up when conditions are really bad and the main roads are usually salted well enough to not be iced over. So I was ultimately looking for a compromise, but you're right with the added weight of the vehicle and poor tires, it's not a good situation to be in. If anything probably still best to get the 20s if that is the goal.
 

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I would def get 20's if that is the case, not to mention I would imagine that you will see much faster wear with summer travel in warmer climates on that rubber. At least the 20's were purpose built by Pirelli for the R1T to cover a wide array of conditions. Best scenario would be 2 sets of wheels and tires for summer and winter. Which reminds me that I need to swap out my winter wheels and tires for summers this week...
 

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Need a little help on a related issue. My R1T scheduled for delivery July and just saw my first live viewing of the truck! Had originally chosen the 21" road tires but the 20" AT looked so much better on the truck! A Rivian tech related that the noise and ride difference between the 20" and the 21" is "very minimal". Living in MI, 90% of driving will be on roads and 10% probably dirt and mud. (snow is not a consideration!). Any thoughts on noise and ride for 21 vs 20?
THANKS
 

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I live in SoCal, so most of my driving will be pavement and in warm weather. The local mountain here during the winter does require 3PMSF and not just M+S, and stopping on the side of the road just to throw chains on is really not worth the hassle since I never go up when conditions are really bad and the main roads are usually salted well enough to not be iced over. So I was ultimately looking for a compromise, but you're right with the added weight of the vehicle and poor tires, it's not a good situation to be in. If anything probably still best to get the 20s if that is the goal.
I was born and raised in Tahoe, I checked CA does not require 3PMSF to negate chains. Many dedicated winter tires do not have the 3PMSF

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cool thanks for that. I did a bit more digging and there's varying levels for the mountain that I frequent.

Caltrans Chain Control Requirement Levels:
R-0: No Restrictions
R-1: Chains or snow tread tires required. Snow tires must have a tread depth of 6/32″ with an M&S imprint on the tire’s sidewall.
R-2: Chains required on all vehicles, except four-wheel drives or all-wheel drives with snow tread tires on all four wheels. Four-wheel drives must carry chains in the vehicle. If you have four-wheel drive, engage it. Use 4-Low only if your vehicle becomes stuck.
R-3: Chains required on all vehicles, no exceptions.

Now I swear I remember reading 3PMSF would suffice, but now I'm questioning whether that is the case.
 

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Cool thanks for that. I did a bit more digging and there's varying levels for the mountain that I frequent.

Caltrans Chain Control Requirement Levels:
R-0: No Restrictions
R-1: Chains or snow tread tires required. Snow tires must have a tread depth of 6/32″ with an M&S imprint on the tire’s sidewall.
R-2: Chains required on all vehicles, except four-wheel drives or all-wheel drives with snow tread tires on all four wheels. Four-wheel drives must carry chains in the vehicle. If you have four-wheel drive, engage it. Use 4-Low only if your vehicle becomes stuck.
R-3: Chains required on all vehicles, no exceptions.

Now I swear I remember reading 3PMSF would suffice, but now I'm questioning whether that is the case.
I lived in Tahoe from the mid 1970’s until I finished undergrad in 1997. Then went back for a gap year (well 2 years) year prior to residency. Left for good in 2002 but the road controls were the same back then. I’m all my years there I only remember getting my tires checked once or twice when it was R3 and local traffic only so they were checking my address on my DL and looking for winter tires or chains. My dads best friend was chief of police in S all Tahoe growing up I remember him telling me that in winter wrecks tires are the first thing they check to see if you met the restriction requirements and if not you are charged with the crash no matter what if you do not meet the restrictions. Winter specific tires count as traction devices, back then it was studs but studless winter may count now.

With over (I can believe I’m saying this) 30 years of driving in regions with long harsh high snow winters. Mostly Tahoe and Alaska, Other then that only spent 2 winters in the Appalachians. A few things I’ve learned. Tires are the #1 factor in winter driving. I have a buddy with a RWD Mustang on Hakka 9’s, in the winter he will run circles around the best Subarus/Audis/… that are on ATs/all seasons. Going isn’t usually the problem, stopping is. As long as tires aren’t complete crap most AWD/4WDs don’t have a problem getting moving and rarely get stuck, but 4WD does nothing to help with stopping distance and most all seasons/ATs slide like a runner sled on ice and packed snow. Lastly if it saves you from one wreck good winter tires are completely worth it.

that said if you only go up there a couple times a winter and can pick and chose to only go when the roads are completely clear it looks like the OEM 22 tires are M+S rated. And I still have no idea why people put large rims that negatively effect the performance on vehicles, increase stopping distance, decrease acceleration, decrease cornering grip, increase cost, decrease ride quality,…. One of the first things I did when I bought my LX570 was swap the 20” for 17”. But I’m me and you are you so if you want the 22’s and are ok with the trade offs go for it.
 

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Just so everyone’s aware, this is what the Owners Manual says about snow chains / traction devices. Not recommended at all on 20” wheels and only “low profile” ones (on rear only) for 21” and 22” wheels.

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