Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
7-Eleven is planning to install 500 DC fast chargers at 250 locations across North America by the end of 2022.

These stations are going to be owned and operated by 7-Eleven, rather than them partnering with someone else.

So far 7-Eleven only has 22 charging stations in 14 stores across 4 states.


Convenience stores are ubiquitous – and they sell the vast majority of gas purchased by consumers in the United States. But as more Americans transition to electric vehicles, a major reason people visit convenience stores will disappear.

Industry giant 7-Eleven is looking to capture this growing market of EV drivers. The company said Tuesday it will install 500 direct-current fast charging ports at 250 locations across North America by the end of 2022. These charging stations will be owned and operated by 7-Eleven, as opposed to fuel at its filling stations, which must be purchased from suppliers.

Many charging stations from some of the country’s largest providers, like EVgo, ChargePoint or Tesla’s Supercharger network, are located in a patchwork of parking lots adjacent to shopping malls or retailers like Target. But a major draw of convenience stores like 7-Eleven is that they’re already located in areas adjacent to highways or major roads – so they may have a leg up in attracting drivers.

7-Eleven may have another advantage in choosing to install DC fast chargers as opposed to slower level 2 chargers: The majority of convenience retailers are designed for quick, in-and-out service – around the time it takes to fill a tank of gas. Many don’t offer temperature-controlled places to sit, so a longer charging time would likely pose a problem for drivers. While older EV models are limited by the amount of kilowatt charges they can accept (so the output rate of the charger is inconsequential to how long it takes to charge the battery), newer vehicles can accept a wider range of charging rates.

As charging infrastructure – or lack thereof – remains one of the largest barriers to EV adoption, planned build-outs from mainstream retailers like the one announced by 7-Eleven could help reduce some consumer hesitancy over EVs.

The 500 charging stations will join 7-Eleven’s existing network of 22 charging stations, which are located in 14 stores across four states.
 

·
Super Moderator
2015 Tesla Model S 85D, 2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD OffRoad
Joined
·
603 Posts
Should be interesting. Compared to other brands like Sheetz or Flying J, 7-elevens generally have really small parking lots. I’m guessing they’ll just have one or maybe two chargers at each store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Should be interesting. Compared to other brands like Sheetz or Flying J, 7-elevens generally have really small parking lots. I’m guessing they’ll just have one or maybe two chargers at each store.
Some 7-Elevens sell gas and can be large. The corner-store versions without gas can indeed be small, however.

My experience with 7-Eleven (love Slurpees) is that they don't like loitering... so it'll be interesting how EV charging works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I previously worked for 7-Eleven corporate and know that the EV chargers have been on the back burner for a while. Hopefully they can flex their scale to really push the EV infrastructure to the mainstream. Keep in mind that fuel stores only represent a fraction of their overall store count. Another reason they haven't had this higher on the priority list is that they are a large corporation and implementing something like this across their network potentially means huge dollars... current store count is roughly 14,000 locations. It takes a lot to plan out that scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
I previously worked for 7-Eleven corporate and know that the EV chargers have been on the back burner for a while. Hopefully they can flex their scale to really push the EV infrastructure to the mainstream. Keep in mind that fuel stores only represent a fraction of their overall store count. Another reason they haven't had this higher on the priority list is that they are a large corporation and implementing something like this across their network potentially means huge dollars... current store count is roughly 14,000 locations. It takes a lot to plan out that scale.
Any idea how many are actually corporate-owned compared to franchised?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
7-Eleven is planning to install 500 DC fast chargers at 250 locations across North America by the end of 2022.

These stations are going to be owned and operated by 7-Eleven, rather than them partnering with someone else.

So far 7-Eleven only has 22 charging stations in 14 stores across 4 states.


Convenience stores are ubiquitous – and they sell the vast majority of gas purchased by consumers in the United States. But as more Americans transition to electric vehicles, a major reason people visit convenience stores will disappear.

Industry giant 7-Eleven is looking to capture this growing market of EV drivers. The company said Tuesday it will install 500 direct-current fast charging ports at 250 locations across North America by the end of 2022. These charging stations will be owned and operated by 7-Eleven, as opposed to fuel at its filling stations, which must be purchased from suppliers.

Many charging stations from some of the country’s largest providers, like EVgo, ChargePoint or Tesla’s Supercharger network, are located in a patchwork of parking lots adjacent to shopping malls or retailers like Target. But a major draw of convenience stores like 7-Eleven is that they’re already located in areas adjacent to highways or major roads – so they may have a leg up in attracting drivers.

7-Eleven may have another advantage in choosing to install DC fast chargers as opposed to slower level 2 chargers: The majority of convenience retailers are designed for quick, in-and-out service – around the time it takes to fill a tank of gas. Many don’t offer temperature-controlled places to sit, so a longer charging time would likely pose a problem for drivers. While older EV models are limited by the amount of kilowatt charges they can accept (so the output rate of the charger is inconsequential to how long it takes to charge the battery), newer vehicles can accept a wider range of charging rates.

As charging infrastructure – or lack thereof – remains one of the largest barriers to EV adoption, planned build-outs from mainstream retailers like the one announced by 7-Eleven could help reduce some consumer hesitancy over EVs.

The 500 charging stations will join 7-Eleven’s existing network of 22 charging stations, which are located in 14 stores across four states.
The photo of the DCFC with 7Eleven logo appears to be a 62.5kW charger that have been installed at multiple locations in Michigan. The article does not state the kW charger capacity and I doubt it will be more than what Dunkin Dounuts offers around here with 35 and 50kW chargers.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top