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Comments on the charging infrastructure part of the proposal are welcome, but let’s not turn this into a huge political debate on the overall plan.


Investing in electric vehicles ranks as one of Biden’s top climate-spending priorities, with $174 billion designated for that market alone. White House officials predicted the federal incentives, paired with spending by state and local governments and private companies, would establish a national network of 500,000 charging stations by 2030, while spurring a domestic supply chain that will support union jobs and American-built cars and trucks.

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), who has been working to bring the different parties together on a compromise to cut carbon emissions from cars and trucks, said in an interview this week that funding charging stations and better transmission lines will be key. “People aren’t going to buy electric vehicles until we have the charging infrastructure and the electricity grid to support it,” she said.
 

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Comments on the charging infrastructure part of the proposal are welcome, but let’s not turn this into a huge political debate on the overall plan.


Investing in electric vehicles ranks as one of Biden’s top climate-spending priorities, with $174 billion designated for that market alone. White House officials predicted the federal incentives, paired with spending by state and local governments and private companies, would establish a national network of 500,000 charging stations by 2030, while spurring a domestic supply chain that will support union jobs and American-built cars and trucks.

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), who has been working to bring the different parties together on a compromise to cut carbon emissions from cars and trucks, said in an interview this week that funding charging stations and better transmission lines will be key. “People aren’t going to buy electric vehicles until we have the charging infrastructure and the electricity grid to support it,” she said.
I was hoping that I would not see politics brought into this forum. I’ve had it with all the Bullshit that these assholes have to say!
 

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The only politics brought here are by you. The article isn't a commentary. But you would have to look past a logo to actually read it and know that.
The only politics brought here are by you. The article isn't a commentary. But you would have to look past a logo to actually read it and know that.
I have read well past the article to know who’s proposing the bills. Apparently, your not a student of past history.
 

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Comments on the charging infrastructure part of the proposal are welcome, but let’s not turn this into a huge political debate on the overall plan.


Investing in electric vehicles ranks as one of Biden’s top climate-spending priorities, with $174 billion designated for that market alone. White House officials predicted the federal incentives, paired with spending by state and local governments and private companies, would establish a national network of 500,000 charging stations by 2030, while spurring a domestic supply chain that will support union jobs and American-built cars and trucks.

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), who has been working to bring the different parties together on a compromise to cut carbon emissions from cars and trucks, said in an interview this week that funding charging stations and better transmission lines will be key. “People aren’t going to buy electric vehicles until we have the charging infrastructure and the electricity grid to support it,” she said.
We need this infrastructure plan (or something similar) and we need it badly.

I've read several articles that point out that at the state and federal level, there is good reason for leadership to be concerned with charging infrastructure. For example, the US has roughly comparable numbers of EVs on the road to Europe on the whole yet the US in several ways lags far behind when it comes to charging infrastructure, especially for those without off-street parking. And charging/refueling is one of, if not the top concern for consumers who do not own an EV but are considering buying one.

I also personally wonder, and maybe worry a tad bit about the coordination of all these charging stations. Tesla in North America has its own separate plug standard and charging system for convenience to its customers, as is their right. But is also is a big downer in my opinion that we can't effectively have twice the number of chargers (Tesla, Electrify America, ChargePoint, etc.) by getting high-level government agreement on how to partially share charging infrastructure meanwhile preserving the convenience for customers who belong to that specific brand of charger (Tesla, Rivian).

If there's anyone out there that knows a thing or two about ISO standards and the history of how emerging commercial technologies prevail I'd love to hear what you predict at this point on how our charging system map will look 10 years from now! Is there something in the infrastructure proposal that help swing things? Will the US Govt be able to coerce/convince/beg Tesla to switch to CCS (like in Europe in 2018) or maybe add some CCS stalls? Or will we continue to have this two standard landscape? (CHAdeMO is virtually extirpated at this point)

Peace!
 

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Not an expert by any means, but here is my opinion. I think CCS will be the standard plug type for the near future(5-10yrs). I believe that Rivians fast chargers will benefit Rivian owners initially and everyone eventually. As I understand it, Rivian will be able to "unlock" the charger for all to use through software. 3rd party charging growth and improvement will also diminish the need for proprietary systems.
 

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I believe that Rivians fast chargers will benefit Rivian owners initially and everyone eventually. As I understand it, Rivian will be able to "unlock" the charger for all to use through software.
I’m on the same page with this. Even after Rivian opens their chargers up to everyone, their chargers are still branded as Rivian and they benefit from marketing to the Chevy driver who uses it. I could also see them “discounting” charging rates to Rivian drivers for both driver loyalty and to give others a reason to buy.
 

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Rivian has been getting some good coverage in the press lately and this one from Bloomberg sums it up quite well.

If — or, more likely, when — all the business books start to drop about Rivian Automotive Inc., at least one should be titled: Do All the Hard Things at Once. The young company is currently trying to finish a factory and three different vehicles, while planning a road trip to a Wall Street IPO. Apparently, Chief Executive Officer R.J. Scaringe was still getting a little too much sleep, because Rivian two weeks ago announced a plan to build its own charging network as well, à la Tesla.

The decision, which Scaringe has hinted at for years, comprises at least 3,500 fast chargers at 600 sites and at least 10,000 slower-charging “waypoints” at campsites, motels, hiking trailheads, and the like — all installed by 2024. It’s a hugely expensive capital project: The hardware alone in building a fast-charging site can cost up to $320,000, according to one study, to say nothing of maintenance and other soft costs. In short, Rivian’s go-it-alone strategy is a quiet indictment of U.S. infrastructure: What’s out there at the moment, apparently, is not nearly enough.

Tesla opted for the same kind of proprietary network, but that was nine years ago. The non-Tesla charging map has grown denser in the time since, but pins are still thin beyond urban centers, and the center of the country is blanketed with electron deserts.

At the moment, Tesla has 9,723 fast-charging cords in the U.S., according to the latest Energy Department tally. The other networks combined have just 7,589 outlets for public charging, and those are far less widely scattered. The Tesla club is covered in Millinocket, Me., Athens, Ala., and Casper, Wyo.—all places where Ford’s juiced-up new Mustang Mach-E may struggle to run free. While this is a challenge for Ford, it’s a bigger obstacle for Rivian’s “Electric Adventure Vehicles,” ostensibly headed to places more wild than the Santa Monica farmer’s market.
 
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