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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did an off road recovery course out at the Hollister Hills SVRA. The guys that run the course also help with recovery of broken down vehicles. They reported that they've recovered three Rivians...all with the same problem, broken tie rods. They are recommending that I upgrade my tie rods. Has anyone else heard about this issue? Has anyone upgraded their tie rods? Curious!
 

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I don’t know. Watched through this a few times with the close ups of the components look very small: control arms, CVS, lower arms, bushings,…( well except for the massive brakes). I would have this fear that the tie rods are the fuse and beefier rods would just cause a failure somewhere else. If it were me and I was going somwhere like Moab would carry an extra set of tie rods and tools rather then replace to beefier rods. As seen here tire rods are somewhat easy to replace on trail, other suspension/drive components could not be.

I think it’s the combo of massive instant torque, air suspension (when raised limits down travel and puts more stress on things like the tie rods at baseline) and inappropriately large wheels that stress the suspension and limit the ability to air down.

Also I wouldn’t be supervised if Rivian did not cover this under warranty. With pretty much all brands damage off roading (and on a track) is not covered and they have video evidence this is where it failed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don’t know. Watched through this a few times with the close ups of the components look very small: control arms, CVS, lower arms, bushings,…( well except for the massive brakes). I would have this fear that the tie rods are the fuse and beefier rods would just cause a failure somewhere else. If it were me and I was going somwhere like Moab would carry an extra set of tie rods and tools rather then replace to beefier rods. As seen here tire rods are somewhat easy to replace on trail, other suspension/drive components could not be.

I think it’s the combo of massive instant torque, air suspension (when raised limits down travel and puts more stress on things like the tie rods at baseline) and inappropriately large wheels that stress the suspension and limit the ability to air down.

Also I wouldn’t be supervised if Rivian did not cover this under warranty. With pretty much all brands damage off roading (and on a track) is not covered and they have video evidence this is where it failed.
Talked to Rivian today...they are aware of the issue. I really like your idea of traveling with a spare tie rod or two. Rivian service is going to get back in touch with me with how I can procure a couple from either them or the supplier that made them. They are not currently planning on changing the tie rods they use. I am sure the after market will eventually offer something that is appropriate for off roading in a Rivian.
 

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Talked to Rivian today...they are aware of the issue. I really like your idea of traveling with a spare tie rod or two. Rivian service is going to get back in touch with me with how I can procure a couple from either them or the supplier that made them. They are not currently planning on changing the tie rods they use. I am sure the after market will eventually offer something that is appropriate for off roading in a Rivian.
It is common to carry extra parts when off roading. Like mentioned im a Land Cruiser guy, very stout and reliable. I carry JB weld, duct tape, baling wire, there are quite a few regular trips I make that I take an extra spare tire (so 2 in total): Dalton highway, stease highway, dempster highway, McCarthy road,…. Jeep guys I off road with carry: axles, u joints, drivelines, synchros, steering pumps, …. Land Rover guys take a back up toyota, tow truck, or sat phone, flair gun, and supplies to survive while they are waiting to get rescued :)

in the grand scheme like I said tie rods are relatively easy and cheep to replace on trial. Personally I would hate to put on beefier rods then blow the air spring, control arm, driveline, CV,…. I would add that make sure you have the tools needed and a hi lift Jack that will work with the Rivian.
 
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