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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am coming from 5 Teslas over the last 9 years between my wife and me, and we have 2 daisy chained Tesla chargers on a 100 amp circuit at home in our garage. taking delivery of our R1T I wanted to find an adapter to maximize charging speed while still being compact to take with me on road trips so I could use Tesla's destination chargers at hotels, etc..

I compared the specs and reviews of many of the plastic alternatives, and am so glad someone mentioned the Tesla Tap Mini (TeslaTap MINI 80 AMP) as an alternative. Instead of a large plastic adapter, it is a machined metal adapter that is about the size of your hand and fits easily in the under seat storage draw. Using it I was a little leary of the all-metal thinking it might got hot, but so far I have not felt any warmth when unplugging it. It comes in 40, 60 and 80 amp varieties, and using the 80 amp at home I am charging at 25 miles an hour with our setup.

One interesting note is the adapter instructs you to wait 30 seconds for the circuit in the adapter to communicate with the wall charger. For me when I plug the adapter on the Tesla plug, I can hear an audible click, and the light on the Tesla wall charger turns green, this happens after a couple of seconds, and I have been able to charge then without any issues or faults.

Just wanted to share my experience with what is for me a great product.


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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yes there is a wide range of power at the Tesla destination chargers. Unfortunately there is no standard. I think locations use what they have available. Some are definitely are faster than others, though I am glad to have it as an option when parking anyway. I think the Tesla HPWC maxes out at 80amps, well beyond the 48 amps we can use. Usually the charge is enough to give you a full battery after a day’s drive and night's rest, so you start full without having to think about charging first thing, even with a lower power from the HPWC at a destination charge.
 

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Cr
This is good to hear. I have Lectron adapter that continuously fails with Tesla wall units. Looking to get this instead.
Crap, really? I bought this Lectron but haven't used it yet. I hope it doesn't "tap out" on my when I need it sometime.
 

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Rivian R1T (Adventure - CR, BM, 21", Ordered 10/5/2021, Delivered 6/24/2022), Suburban 2500, VW ID.4
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Cr

Crap, really? I bought this Lectron but haven't used it yet. I hope it doesn't "tap out" on my when I need it sometime.
For what it's worth I have the Lectron and it hasn't been an issue. I have only used it a few times though, don't rely on it for everyday charging, just opportunity charging when I am out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One of the things I was amazed about with the Teslatap Mini was despite being completely machined metal; it doesn't get hot. I think possibly a testament to being quality made with great tolerances.
 

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Tesla Model Y LR 2020; Rivian R1T Adventure 2022 (Reservation)
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Yes there is a wide range of power at the Tesla destination chargers. Unfortunately there is no standard. I think locations use what they have available. Some are definitely are faster than others, though I am glad to have it as an option when parking anyway. I think the Tesla HPWC maxes out at 80amps, well beyond the 48 amps we can use. Usually the charge is enough to give you a full battery after a day’s drive and night's rest, so you start full without having to think about charging first thing, even with a lower power from the HPWC at a destination charge.
Older Tesla Model S and X had the option for dual chargers which brought them up to 80 amps I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Older Tesla Model S and X had the option for dual chargers which brought them up to 80 amps I believe.
Yes, That is why I originally installed my charger on a 100-amp circuit for my 2014 Model S. When we got a second Tesla, was right about the time they dropped the dual chargers, so we added a second charger two the same line so each could pull up to 50amps each.
 

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Cr

Crap, really? I bought this Lectron but haven't used it yet. I hope it doesn't "tap out" on my when I need it sometime.
Looks like you got the 48amp version. I have the 40amp one because that's all they had when I got my truck back in March. Lectron customer service while very responsive was not willing to allow me to return it and get this version or offer me a credit. I would have even tried just a replacement of the same unit. No go, they kept saying it my vehicle. Doesn't matter.
 

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Ok, perhaps a word of caution. I just returned from the SC yesterday for some minor maintenance. Somehow got on the conversation of charging and using Tesla destination chargers. The service rep. recommended not using these adapters. He said they can fry the inverter. Invariably when they look around the vehicle they will find one. Voids the warranty for the inverter. The cost to replace the inverter clocks in around $7000.00. I own one and now fear if I use it I will damage the inverter. I have no idea if the inverter failed on its own or something rings true about these adapters not safe to use.
 

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Tesla Model Y, Cadillac ELR, Rivian R1T, Chevrolet Volt, Spark EV
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Ok, perhaps a word of caution. I just returned from the SC yesterday for some minor maintenance. Somehow got on the conversation of charging and using Tesla destination chargers. The service rep. recommended not using these adapters. He said they can fry the inverter. Invariably when they look around the vehicle they will find one. Voids the warranty for the inverter. The cost to replace the inverter clocks in around $7000.00. I own one and now fear if I use it I will damage the inverter. I have no idea if the inverter failed on its own or something rings true about these adapters not safe to use.
In that case, I guess I will remove mine before taking it to the service center so they never find it lol. The myriad of available Tesla chargers are a boon, and I'm sure not going to stop taking advantage of them.

Being intimately familiar with how handshaking with the EVSE works, I also believe the service tech to be acting the chicken little. Let me explain why:

There is no difference in handshaking between NACS and j1772. In both cases, a signal from the evse tells your vehicle's charger how much power it can supply. Example, I am a "6.6 KW EVSE, or I am an 11 KW EVSE." Your onboard charger then uses this information to draw up to what the EVSE's maximum ability to provide happens to be.

If something were to go wrong with this handshaking, which is I assume what the service tech was inferring, it is possible that your charger could try to pull too much from the EVSE. That would blow the protection circuit on the EVSE, but I cannot imagine any way that that would damage your on-board charger.

I don't know about any of you guys, but in my years I have been told so many tall tales by automotive service technicians, that I take everything with a pretty healthy dose of salt. I was once told by a GM tech that my Spark had been damaged because I charged it with a "non Chevrolet charger." The dealership tried to deny my warranty claim based on that, but of course was reversed very quickly as soon as I called Chevrolet. Make your own judgment, but I think this is one of those where the tech's statements make zero sense.

Again, just in case, I will remove my adapter when taking the truck in LOL.
 

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I agree I think it's probably a tall tale. I feel sorry for the person that was told he fried his inverter. I haven't look into how all this charging works. You would think that if this were a real issue with the amount of Rivians out there the forums would be ablaze with chatter about this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
In that case, I guess I will remove mine before taking it to the service center so they never find it lol. The myriad of available Tesla chargers are a boon, and I'm sure not going to stop taking advantage of them.

Being intimately familiar with how handshaking with the EVSE works, I also believe the service tech to be acting the chicken little. Let me explain why:

There is no difference in handshaking between NACS and j1772. In both cases, a signal from the evse tells your vehicle's charger how much power it can supply. Example, I am a "6.6 KW EVSE, or I am an 11 KW EVSE." Your onboard charger then uses this information to draw up to what the EVSE's maximum ability to provide happens to be.

If something were to go wrong with this handshaking, which is I assume what the service tech was inferring, it is possible that your charger could try to pull too much from the EVSE. That would blow the protection circuit on the EVSE, but I cannot imagine any way that that would damage your on-board charger.

I don't know about any of you guys, but in my years I have been told so many tall tales by automotive service technicians, that I take everything with a pretty healthy dose of salt. I was once told by a GM tech that my Spark had been damaged because I charged it with a "non Chevrolet charger." The dealership tried to deny my warranty claim based on that, but of course was reversed very quickly as soon as I called Chevrolet. Make your own judgment, but I think this is one of those where the tech's statements make zero sense.

Again, just in case, I will remove my adapter when taking the truck in LOL.
Your logic makes complete sense. Weird why that one in the wild service rep. would even say that. It’s like saying they would only provide warranty coverage if you used only explicitly Rivian approved chargers. Doing a cursory Google search I could find no issues reported of failed Rivian inverters. I vote that this is one service rep. talking out of something besides his or her mouth. As per the Magnuson-Moss Warranty act, they would have to prove that the specific adapter caused the damage if and when the inverter went out.
 

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Your logic makes complete sense. Weird why that one in the wild service rep. would even say that. It’s like saying they would only provide warranty coverage if you used only explicitly Rivian approved chargers. Doing a cursory Google search I could find no issues reported of failed Rivian inverters. I vote that this is one service rep. talking out of something besides his or her mouth. As per the Magnuson-Moss Warranty act, they would have to prove that the specific adapter caused the damage if and when the inverter went out.
I got the impression from the rep. that the adapters were not Rivian approved?
 

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Rivian R1T (Adventure - CR, BM, 21", Ordered 10/5/2021, Delivered 6/24/2022), Suburban 2500, VW ID.4
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I got the impression from the rep. that the adapters were not Rivian approved?
Nothing that isn't designed or built by Rivian is "Rivian approved". That isn't to say it is dangerous or will cause damage to use it. As stated above to deny your warranty coverage they have to prove that the aftermarket part you used caused the damage, then they can deny warranty coverage, but only on that part or system, not for your vehicle as a whole.
 
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