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There are no adapters that operate safely with a Supercharger, which is a Direct Current to Direct Current charger that operates at 400V or 800V and big current. Liquid cooled cables. You don't mess with that with an adapter.

The adapters that do exist are for Level 2 charging, which is 240V and current up to ca. 60 Amps, but in most households that's limited to 32 Amps, which is also what a NEMA 14-50 connector maximally supports. Google "teslatap", for example.
 

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Is there a adapter that a Rivian owner could use to charge at a Tesla charging bank?
A Rivian can charge using a Tesla connector, but not a Supercharger.
There's a variety of "1772 to Tesla" adapters (plug one end into the Tesla charge connector, the other end goes into the Level 2 1772 port of the Rivian.) Some are rated up to 48A.
Tesla has said it will eventually allow public access to Superchargers. European countries have already compelled Tesla to open up their network to the public (Norway comes to mind.) There's costs involved. I'm not sure it's legal or "right" for a government to compel a corporation to give up its competitive advantage or share resources which provide value and service to its customers, but the general argument is the value is the electricity which is a government service (though that's a lie, since the electricity is revenue to a power and grid corporation since governments were dumb enough to corporatize public assets and services long ago …)
As someone with a Rivian in the garage, I want Rivian and the corporate charging networks to hurry up and use that $5B of tax dollars to build out those networks. As someone with a Tesla beside the Rivian, I don't want the already overcrowded Supercharger network to be a sh!tshow of Tesla drivers and other EV drivers fighting (literally, it happens already between Tesla drivers) over plugging in to charge.
The charging networks are about 5 years behind the demand and another 5 years behind the need for national coverage.
The Supercharger network is about 2 years behind the demand and maybe another 2 years behind potentially sufficient national coverage.
 

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There are no adapters that operate safely with a Supercharger, which is a Direct Current to Direct Current charger that operates at 400V or 800V and big current. Liquid cooled cables. You don't mess with that with an adapter.

The adapters that do exist are for Level 2 charging, which is 240V and current up to ca. 60 Amps, but in most households that's limited to 32 Amps, which is also what a NEMA 14-50 connector maximally supports. Google "teslatap", for example.

Level 2 charging is up to 80 amps, not 60!
 

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Well if you're going to pick nits, then the thing to pick on is the statement
32 Amps, which is also what a NEMA 14-50 connector maximally supports
NEMA 14-50 is tied to a 50A circuit breaker, which supports up to 40 Amps for an EVSE (because an EVSE is a continuous load, it can only use 80% of the rated capacity by code).

I don't know if there is a "maximum" defined current value for Level 2 charging, but an 80A EVSE would need to be on a 100A circuit. There are not many cars that can accept that much current in Level 2 charging, and not many EVSEs that can provide that much current. Tesla destination chargers default to 40A I believe, and some (all?) can provide up to 80A.

Relevant to this thread, though, you can't use Tesla superchargers (Level 3), only Tesla destination chargers (Level 2), and yes there are adapters like the Teslatap and the Lectron which will let you do this. The Rivian will not draw more than 48A for Level 2 charging, so as long as your adapter supports at least 48A you should have no problems.
 

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Yes the maximum allowable current for level 2 charging is 80 amps or 90KW determined by SAE. Many make EVSE's to that current limit. Eaton, and Tesla are the largest. I have found that you don't usually need the full 80 amps, and it maxes the cabling to the car and some heat is produced.

Tesla destination chargers are programmable at the installation to accommodate the current available to them. I have seen from 20 amps to the full 80.
 

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A little tangential, but I read the Lightning has the option of dual chargers for 100A … that's what Tesla was promising back in 2016 and slowly downgraded from 80A to now 48A (which is actually pretty damn inconveniently slow when you get home on a Friday night and want to charge while you pack up to leave for the weekend … my "old" 2018 does so much better than the "new" 2022 model.) I have the Lightning on order and the prospect of 100A home charging strikes me as actually valuable for experience EV drivers who know that charging at home before you leave is so much less annoying than stopping along the way or at least giving you the range to choose an empty charging location and drive past the crowded sites … overcrowded charging sites is going to go from bad (2018) to worse (2020) to horrific (2022) with the huge sales of EVs and the almost imperceptible number of new charging sites.
 

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Yes the maximum allowable current for level 2 charging is 80 amps or 90KW determined by SAE.
SAE sets the standards for the J1772 connector. The maximum current for a J1772 is 80A as per the SAE specification.

A Tesla proprietary connector, which is not a J1772, can have a different rating for Level 2 charging.

As far as I know, "Level 2" itself is not a standardized term, but the common definition is that Level 2 is 240V AC charging at a variety of currents, versus 120V AC for Level 1.
 

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SAE sets the standards for the J1772 connector. The maximum current for a J1772 is 80A as per the SAE specification.

A Tesla proprietary connector, which is not a J1772, can have a different rating for Level 2 charging.

As far as I know, "Level 2" itself is not a standardized term, but the common definition is that Level 2 is 240V AC charging at a variety of currents, versus 120V AC for Level 1.
I is a standard set by SAE. Tesla is also limited to 80 amps (90 kw) for level 2 charging.
 

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Tesla destination chargers are programmable at the installation to accommodate the current available to them. I have seen from 20 amps to the full 80.
it depends on the version. Some older models could be configured for 80A, but the current generation is capped at 48A.

The Hummer EV and Lightning may be reviving interest in high-current Level 2 charging — either because they’re so darn inefficient (Hummer) or for V2L capabilities (Lightning). But for normal purposes, the industry seems to have settled in the 32-48A range/
 

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There are no adapters that operate safely with a Supercharger, which is a Direct Current to Direct Current charger that operates at 400V or 800V and big current.
Teslas are 400V, the more advanced Porsche, Kia and Hyundai's are 800V. Adapters are easy enough, Tesla has some for early Teslas in the EU going from Tesla to CCS, $200, to allow Teslas to use the DC CCS chargers which can be a bit bigger than Teslas, 350kW capacity vs. Tesla's 150/250. We see that in US with EA's typically having a 350kW charger. Teslas in EU and Korea and now CCS plug and socket. The Tesla/CCS adapter was good for 140kW at 400V.
 

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There are no adapters that operate safely with a Supercharger, which is a Direct Current to Direct Current charger that operates at 400V or 800V and big current. Liquid cooled cables. You don't mess with that with an adapter.

The adapters that do exist are for Level 2 charging, which is 240V and current up to ca. 60 Amps, but in most households that's limited to 32 Amps, which is also what a NEMA 14-50 connector maximally supports. Google "teslatap", for example.
I bought the TeslaTap to 22666, rated up to 80 Amps.I have used it successfully 0n 3 of 3 attempts. This is for a 240v tesla destination charger often found at hotels or in homes.
 
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