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Interesting article from Teslerati. It looks like the estimates for EV adoption have been consistently underestimated: they've doubled from 2018, outpacing the growth estimates substantially. If EV growth continues at that pace, I wonder if the charging infrastructure will be able to keep up. If not, it could turn out that charging, not supply chain issues, parts shortages, range anxiety, etc, will be the limiting factor in EV adoption

EV adoption in the U.S. happening much faster than anticipated
 

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The charger situation is getting serious... I live in St Pete FL and we have 3 - 50 kw fast chargers, and around 20 level 1... terribly insufficient.
I'm going to attend some city council meetings to bring up this subject... We're supposed to be a somewhat progressive city.
 

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Interesting article from Teslerati. It looks like the estimates for EV adoption have been consistently underestimated: they've doubled from 2018, outpacing the growth estimates substantially. If EV growth continues at that pace, I wonder if the charging infrastructure will be able to keep up. If not, it could turn out that charging, not supply chain issues, parts shortages, range anxiety, etc, will be the limiting factor in EV adoption

EV adoption in the U.S. happening much faster than anticipated
I think it is certain that EV adoption will be hampered by the charging infrastructure not keeping pace. IMO the charging infrastructure is already a limiter.

There are millions of apartment /condo/townhouse/mobile home folks that don’t have at home charging capability and will not for a long time. Most of the places they work don’t have charging ports either.

In the not too distant future the few meager charging ports available will be overwhelmed resulting in waiting lines. In my area Just a year ago I might see an EV every few weeks but now I see 3-6 every day.

IMO the only reason the charging infrastructure has not been overwhelmed already is because the supply chain limits production.
 

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I would imagine people being home and being allowed to work remotely for several days a week changed their driving patterns. Couple that with the fluctuations in gas prices EVs look great. It doesn't hurt that there is more than Tesla now, giving people plenty of choices. I see Ioniq5, EV6, Porsche, ID4s everywhere not to mention all the teslas.

Charging is about to be our biggest problem but there are plans to fix it. I know for a fact that in NY/NJ I have plenty of choices right now and with Tesla opening up to other cars it will grow significantly.
 

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The charger situation is getting serious... I live in St Pete FL and we have 3 - 50 kw fast chargers, and around 20 level 1... terribly insufficient.
I'm going to attend some city council meetings to bring up this subject... We're supposed to be a somewhat progressive city.
Go armed with info on available Federal grants to install chargers, stats on EV sales locally and nationally, cheap solution for a town is require all gas stations with a convenience store to add 4 x 250kW chargers with the town helping the local businesses with loans, grants, waiving permit fees and help getting the Federal EV charger subsidies.
 

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There are millions of apartment /condo/townhouse/mobile home folks that don’t have at home charging capability and will not for a long time. Most of the places they work don’t have charging ports either.
This is something I’ve experienced first hand as we have been living out of the house last several months. Charging wherever we can has been a challenge even though we are lucky enough to have charging at work. With two EVs (esp. the R1T) we still find ourselves visiting random rec centers and the local library etc. I’ve gotten good at finding playgrounds for my kids with nearby charging. if we didn’t have 6kW stations at work, the charging situation would get borderline impossible.
 

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I think it is certain that EV adoption will be hampered by the charging infrastructure not keeping pace. IMO the charging infrastructure is already a limiter.

There are millions of apartment /condo/townhouse/mobile home folks that don’t have at home charging capability and will not for a long time. Most of the places they work don’t have charging ports either.

In the not too distant future the few meager charging ports available will be overwhelmed resulting in waiting lines. In my area Just a year ago I might see an EV every few weeks but now I see 3-6 every day.

IMO the only reason the charging infrastructure has not been overwhelmed already is because the supply chain limits production.
This is spot on. California signing into law banning sale of gas powered vehicles by 2035 and then asking people to stop charging to avoid a blackout is all we need to know about the infrastructure in place for this lofty goal.
 

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I would imagine people being home and being allowed to work remotely for several days a week changed their driving patterns. Couple that with the fluctuations in gas prices EVs look great. It doesn't hurt that there is more than Tesla now, giving people plenty of choices. I see Ioniq5, EV6, Porsche, ID4s everywhere not to mention all the teslas.

Charging is about to be our biggest problem but there are plans to fix it. I know for a fact that in NY/NJ I have plenty of choices right now and with Tesla opening up to other cars it will grow significantly.
I live in Florida, our apartment complex has 4 chargers, max 10kWh, but they are free of charge. I plug in, 12 hours later im at 85% and good. Within 5 miles of work there are 5 or 6 350kWh super chargers at an Electrify America station. There is ample charging as long as people charge at home which many fail to do.
 

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15 MS 70D, Chevy Bolt, Yamaha T700
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For widespread adoption to people who can't charge at home, charging is the biggest challenge. I personally wouldn't own an EV if I couldn't charge at home, it would be way too much of a hassle. Energy savings would also be negligible if I had to pay commercial charging rates.
 

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it would be way too much of a hassle. Energy savings would also be negligible if I had to pay commercial charging rates.
Ran the Tesla for two years with no home charger. Worked fine and I'm a higher mile per year, 25,000, than average. Depends on your location and your routes of travel for work and recreation.

Tesla was averaging $0.31 per kWh, 310 miles, 75kWh battery, $0.08 per mile. The Subaru was 32 mpg at $0.15 per mile so half the per mile cost just on gasoline savings.

We are adding 500,000 public chargers just via the Build Back Better bill. Tesla, EA, EVgo etc and also adding more.
 
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