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This week I had my first flat tire. I followed all the directions as they were given. There were no tragedies, but the system is wobbly, unstable, and completely inadequate on anything not 100% flat. The Jack moves as you raise it, I had to continue to knock it straight as I raised the vehicle. I am really surprised that at this price point the system is so poorly designed. I have owned two Ford F350s and that jack system is much more effective than this one. Changes need to be made. Please be very careful changing out tires.
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I always try to plug first, easy to do and faster than changing. I keep a pair of needle nose pliers in my tire patch kit.
My last truck got four different flats from hauling debris to a dump sight and I never had to change the tire, The built in compressor on the Rivian is a bonus!
 

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Given that it’s more of an “inflator” than a compressor probably not.
I tested my R1T up to 125psi and it worked like a champ. I believe it goes even higher (something like 140-150psi).

The SCFM is low, so you're not going to run air tools off of it.... But it can build pressure equivalent to a typical compressor.
 

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Is there such a thing as an airjack that could be operated with the compressor?
ARB X-Jack is designed to fill from a vehicle's exhaust or a compressor, so must not require too much pressure (need a lot of volume, though): X-Jack Exhaust Jack ARB Bushranger Exhaust Jack - Expedition Portal

That said, may be better suited using a bottle jack like the safejack (Safe Jack - 4WD, Outdoor,Off road, 4X4 accessories and products.) or a wheeled, floor jack like Pro Eagle jack (3 Ton Big Wheel Off Road Jack "Kratos").
 

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I wouldn't use a 3 ton jack. Get 4 ton or larger. These are heavy vehicles.
You're usually only lifting one wheel. One wheel is not more than 6,000 lbs. See the Pro Eagle FAQ below (an F250 is about the same weight as an R1T, depending on cab/bed configuration):
We recommend the 3 ton jack for vehicles like an F250 or larger.
Anything under that can be handled by our 2 ton jacks. Keep in mind that your Tacoma may weigh 4000 lbs but that is the weight of the entire vehicle. When using a floor jack you are never lifting the entire vehicle at once.
 

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You're usually only lifting one wheel. One wheel is not more than 6,000 lbs. See the Pro Eagle FAQ below (an F250 is about the same weight as an R1T, depending on cab/bed configuration):
We recommend the 3 ton jack for vehicles like an F250 or larger.
Anything under that can be handled by our 2 ton jacks. Keep in mind that your Tacoma may weigh 4000 lbs but that is the weight of the entire vehicle. When using a floor jack you are never lifting the entire vehicle at once.
If you want to take that risk, go for it. I don't. I can't guarantee what the weight distribution is or how things will shift. There are affordable 4 ton jacks on the market, and that gives me a better margin of safety.
 
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