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This experience will be a moving target, as both companies and their vehicles evolve, but this is how the vehicles compare today. I am going to try to avoid nit-picking, because frankly, that would be unfair to the Rivian, as the newer, less "mature" vehicle.

-Driving experience:
I am a truck guy. I love my trucks and Jeeps and "guy" vehicles. I have driven them less and less, however, as getting hooked on the EV experience has soured my taste for pumping gas. I am THRILLED to again be driving a truck. It is having my cake and eating it too. I want to pick the "truck driving experience" every time.

That said, I actually don't. The Rivian uses more than double the number of electrons in a given trip than one of the other EVs. That in mind, I will take one of the more efficient cars (often the Spark EV) to town if all I am doing is making a beer run.

In addition to having all the good things about driving like a truck, the Rivian has another great thing about it's experience; It drives a lot like a Tesla truck. Happily, Rivian did not try to re-invent the wheel with the experience the way some other companies have. If you are coming from a Tesla, it all feels very familiar. PAAK senses you approaching and can unlock the vehicle (glitchy still, but I am sure it will get better). There is no "ON/OFF" button, it "starts" the same way we are used to. I often accidently leave my other EVs "on", because I forget that dumb "off" button. The Rivian's shifter is in the same place, and it works the same way. The UI looks like copy-and-paste on many of the screens, and is all very familiar. This is extremely nice, having both brands in the stable.

-Interior:
The interior of the R1T is gorgeous. I travel on a lot of unpaved roads (Mexico), so my personal preference is biased toward the simple, easy-to-clean surfaces that Tesla is known for. That said, the Rivian is so beautifully appointed that I don't mind so much cleaning all those crevices.

-Suspension:
The Rivian's air-ride is impeccable. This is subjective, and I will resort to just putting out a preference here. I prefer Rivian's "Soft" mode over the Tesla's more sport-tuned suspension. Chalk it up to being an old, disabled VET that really feels the bumps these days.

Even those that prefer a sportier ride are not left out with the Rivian, however, as you can adjust that. To be fair, I am comparing the Rivian to a Model Y, not one of Tesla's air-ride models.

-Power:
The Rivian puts more power to the ground, and you can sure feel it. Again, preference, I wish it didn't. Going back & forth between the vehicles, power delivery in the Rivian can feel jerky; especially in reverse in tight spaces. I think this will get refined, but at the end of the day I really have no need for that much power. That, combined with the quad-motor's struggles on slippery surfaces, has me looking forward to trading this truck in for a dual motor variant once they become available.

-Charging:
This is the elephant in the room. Nobody with an IQ of shoe-size or above would argue that Tesla still has a lock on this technology. I know this, I have a couple of GM EVs in the garage that are also the CCS1 standard. Still, with the Rivian it seems worse. I expect the Spark to be tied to a welfare charging standard, it just feels wrong in the Rivian. This achilles heel quickly soured my wife on the truck.

Initially, I was left with her Y any time she went someplace; she loved the driving experience of the R1T. On her first forrey out of town in it I went to lengths to explain the differences from what she was used to; Tesla holding her hand & doing all the work for her. She was equipped with Plugshare, ABRP and all the apps, and I made sure she knew how to use them. The trip still ended up in a $500 tow bill when the nav routed her to an EA station where they had just pulled out all of the chargers to replace them with new ones. She was incensed. "why wouldn't the vehicle tell her this the way her car does?" She will no longer drive the Rivian; win for me. 😉

It is ironic to me that Tesla holds the key to unlock Rivian's biggest handicap: Opening up the Supercharger Network.

-Driver Assist:
Yeah, not really going to delve into this one too deep. Tesla is stumbling on some stuff for sure, but Rivian is still in diapers here.

-Software:
This is another area I am not going to really dive in too deep, except to say that if you are coming from a Tesla, give Rivian a break & some time to catch up. The NAV is a disaster, it will not do any of the things you are used to. Once you do get a route in it will not accept the updates and mods you are used to, and you cannot trust it (keep your AAA tow card handy if you do). I expect it to improve over time, much the way we saw Tesla's improve. For those of us that are self-sufficient and have no problem out-thinking its shortcomings with apps and math, this is not a problem. It does mean that I would never send my mother-in-law on a trip in the truck the way I would in the Tesla. The Tesla will take care of her, even knowing nothing about EVs. The Rivian just won't. Yet.

-Conclusion:
I love this thing. I am a fan of Rivian and what they are doing, and I am rooting for them to fly smoothly through the challenges of 2023 and bring us new, and exciting products.

One last note, is to the posts that float around the forums stating things like "I am buying a Rivian because it is better quality/better tech/better vehicle" etc. Rivian is an infant, it is just getting off the ground, and cannot really be considered a mas-produced vehicle yet. I could have filled pages with niggles, and there are growing pains ahead. Those statements are not an accurate depiction when comparing an established, mass produced vehicle to one such as the early edition models Rivian is currently making. Such expectations are unfortunate because it often results in a disappointing experience, and bad-mouthing of the company because of it; much the way many of them currently bad-mouth Tesla.

Here is hoping all of you still waiting get yours s00n.
😎
 

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@seanrarey You nailed it!
Have R1T and ‘22 MYP.

I would add:
R1T w Lane assist features feels like nice middle ground between Tesla in regular driving mode and Autopilot On. Rivian’s a very active lane control (too much sometimes) is more acceptable when viewed as a happy medium of the Tesla experience.
 

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Scheduled to take delivery Friday morning. We will still have our 2013 Model S so it will be interesting to compare.
I traded in a 2016 S for the R1T. So, similar boat. Here's what you might not realize-they are about the same size! The S is huge and Riv isn't that big. I think that was a shock. I barely got my S in my garage and I can barely get the RIV in. Pretty cool.
Small thing...Here's what I did. I got TIDAL. The sound system is SO MUCH better.

The amount of storage in an S is huge, it's endless in the Rivian. I picked up my family, stranded on the side of the road in a car full of hockey equip. Not a prob. By the way, I showed up with a spare, a tire repair kit and a truck that could inflate the tire after the repair and also run my electric impact driver. Pretty cool. The hockey sticks fit in the gear tunnel. Pretty cool. My fam got car sick in the S and don't in the Riv.

Charging sucks but you know that. In terms of range, however, I go at least 100 miles further. My '244 miles' in Tesla language was BS. Not ever close. So, I'll take the extra 100 miles. I have only charged once away from home, it was fine, but I know what is out there.

I loved my S, for sure. However, this truck is SO MUCH BETTER!!!! Enjoy
I
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
seanrarey:

Thanks for the excellent comparison.
Quick ? since you are a BEV ‘veteran’ also: did you drive the Ford Lightning and if so, do you have any comparisons between it and the Rivian?

TIA
Yes, I have spent considerable time with the Lightning. There are a great many things that I like about it, starting with the fact that it is based on a very tried and true platform; the F150.

Where Rivian used Tesla as a model for its tech, Ford seems to have used older GM-style technology as a baseline. This includes sandwiched pouch cells in their packs, and external cold plate cooling. Whereas Rivian is still well behind Tesla in pact design, they at least use cylindrical cells and sandwiched cooling.

That said, Ford will be the first to admit that the Lightning is not a purpose-built model, and is just a placeholder for what is to come.

The vehicles are vastly different in Target audience. The Rivian is off-road and adventure focused, while the F-150 is utilitarian and really not a great off-roader. The F-150 has a real pickup bed that will fit thousands of aftermarket products, while the Rivian has space for a couple garbage cans.

Aside from the physical looks factor, there is another huge factor that will separate these vehicles and their public appeal. The F-150 will hit mass production numbers this year, and will be readily available for relatively reasonable prices. Prices are already falling, and units can be had for MSRP across the country.

Rivian will take longer to ramp to actual mass production numbers, and will remain more of a special interest vehicle for people wanting something more unique.
 

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Yes, I have spent considerable time with the Lightning. There are a great many things that I like about it, starting with the fact that it is based on a very tried and true platform; the F150.

Where Rivian used Tesla as a model for its tech, Ford seems to have used older GM-style technology as a baseline. This includes sandwiched pouch cells in their packs, and external cold plate cooling. Whereas Rivian is still well behind Tesla in pact design, they at least use cylindrical cells and sandwiched cooling.

That said, Ford will be the first to admit that the Lightning is not a purpose-built model, and is just a placeholder for what is to come.

The vehicles are vastly different in Target audience. The Rivian is off-road and adventure focused, while the F-150 is utilitarian and really not a great off-roader. The F-150 has a real pickup bed that will fit thousands of aftermarket products, while the Rivian has space for a couple garbage cans.

Aside from the physical looks factor, there is another huge factor that will separate these vehicles and their public appeal. The F-150 will hit mass production numbers this year, and will be readily available for relatively reasonable prices. Prices are already falling, and units can be had for MSRP across the country.

Rivian will take longer to ramp to actual mass production numbers, and will remain more of a special interest vehicle for people wanting something more unique.
It's interesting because my friend bought the Lightning and he thinks the R1T is so ugly. lol

So I think the looks of Rivian's are very polarizing. There certainly seems to be a market for those who want a more traditional-looking truck and are turned off on Rivian because of that. I can only imagine what those people think of the Cybertruck!

I for my part think the Rivian looks amazing...which is probably why I purchased it.

But along with the other items you mentioned, I agree when comparing it to Tesla. I've been complaining about not having a dashcam, but Tesla also didn't have that in the beginning when I first bought my Model S. I just complain because now I expect it...lol
 

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Yes, I have spent considerable time with the Lightning. There are a great many things that I like about it, starting with the fact that it is based on a very tried and true platform; the F150.

Where Rivian used Tesla as a model for its tech, Ford seems to have used older GM-style technology as a baseline. This includes sandwiched pouch cells in their packs, and external cold plate cooling. Whereas Rivian is still well behind Tesla in pact design, they at least use cylindrical cells and sandwiched cooling.

That said, Ford will be the first to admit that the Lightning is not a purpose-built model, and is just a placeholder for what is to come.

The vehicles are vastly different in Target audience. The Rivian is off-road and adventure focused, while the F-150 is utilitarian and really not a great off-roader. The F-150 has a real pickup bed that will fit thousands of aftermarket products, while the Rivian has space for a couple garbage cans.

Aside from the physical looks factor, there is another huge factor that will separate these vehicles and their public appeal. The F-150 will hit mass production numbers this year, and will be readily available for relatively reasonable prices. Prices are already falling, and units can be had for MSRP across the country.

Rivian will take longer to ramp to actual mass production numbers, and will remain more of a special interest vehicle for people wanting something more unique.

Thanks for the rapid reply. One item where the Lightning does have a major advantage is of course its VtH capability and with a battery that large, it can probably run most normal size houses for at least three days.

I read a while back that 2025 is when Ford is supposed to have the Lightning V2 shown on its very own architecture. If there build a Raptor version with a 300 mile range; I'm in!! lol
 

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I traded in a 2016 S for the R1T. So, similar boat. Here's what you might not realize-they are about the same size! The S is huge and Riv isn't that big. I think that was a shock. I barely got my S in my garage and I can barely get the RIV in. Pretty cool.
Small thing...Here's what I did. I got TIDAL. The sound system is SO MUCH better.

The amount of storage in an S is huge, it's endless in the Rivian. I picked up my family, stranded on the side of the road in a car full of hockey equip. Not a prob. By the way, I showed up with a spare, a tire repair kit and a truck that could inflate the tire after the repair and also run my electric impact driver. Pretty cool. The hockey sticks fit in the gear tunnel. Pretty cool. My fam got car sick in the S and don't in the Riv.

Charging sucks but you know that. In terms of range, however, I go at least 100 miles further. My '244 miles' in Tesla language was BS. Not ever close. So, I'll take the extra 100 miles. I have only charged once away from home, it was fine, but I know what is out there.

I loved my S, for sure. However, this truck is SO MUCH BETTER!!!! Enjoy
I
One week in and thought I would throw out a few things I’ve noticed.

1. This truck is AWESOME! The Model S moved to the other side of the garage and hasn’t moved since. My wife never liked driving the S because it sat low but loves the R1T. Just go in knowing that almost everywhere you go someone is going to ask you about the truck. My wife likes to tell me after every errand she runs, “The moon truck struck again”, when she had to spend 5-10 minutes talking to someone.

2. I know it’s quicker than our old P85 but it doesn’t feel that way. I don’t know yet if the accelerator has a longer throw in the Rivian or maybe I’m just babying it. Probably the latter and the fact that it’s so much heavier and planted.

3. Our S is a 2013 so probably not a surprise I think the build quality on the R1T is way better. Much less wind noise. I think motor whine is maybe a little more in the Rivian but our P85 is RWD only so not a fair comparison.

4. As the OP said, this thing uses the electrons. Our Model S lifetime average was about 333watts/mile and so far in the colder winter conditions here in KS I would say the R1T is averaging about 555watts/mi. None of that is a surprise necessarily but it does have me reconsidering only having a 14-50 outlet for home charging like we did for the S. While the S could recharge overnight easily adding over 200mi of dash range in 8hrs, the Rivian would need close to 15hrs I think based on what little I have seen so far. I don’t think that will be an issue with our driving habits and we have a Chargepoint DC charger about 1 mile away if we really needed a quick turnaround for a trip.

5. I miss the auto open/close garage door feature in the Tesla. Hopefully that comes in a future software update.

6. The doors are really hard for the kids to close with the windows up because the truck seals so well. Hopefully there’s a software update coming so the windows crack slightly when the doors are opened and auto close after the door shuts to make it easier.

7. Our S doesn’t have AP hardware so the dynamic cruise is an upgrade for us. The regular cruise however absolutely needs a cancel/resume feature. Especially considering the stronger regen on the Rivian one needs to be on the accelerator when disengaging cruise and we all (hopefully) have had it ingrained in us not to drive with two feet on the brake-accelerator.

8. I miss the energy screen in the Tesla. No long trips in the Rivian yet but I really relied on the Tesla energy screen heavily to look at last 15/30mi efficiency when determining charging needs on a long trip. Maybe the estimated range in the Rivian will prove to be more accurate and I won’t need that crutch.

So far absolutely loving the truck besides those few nit picky items. I still can’t believe this is the first new vehicle I have ever owned in my life.
 

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Left button on steering wheel will toggle you to the last 15 minutes efficiency. I feel like the whole consumption thing could use some work. I tend to use one trip odometer a LOT, and leave the other one alone for "lifetime". Colder weather definitely impacts things. I haven't seen 2 mi/kw at all while the temps are low. I made a 30 mile trip in 17 degree weather and it was abysmal. A lot of people are saying "track it like you do your phone"...in other words, forget miles and start looking only at %.

Lose the 14-50 and go to a 48 amp charger hardwired. It's safer (watch Sandy Munro's YouTube video on this). Hardwired won't burn up the way non-Hubbell receptacles are prone to do. This is not just his "alarmist" POV...my electrician told me the same thing a long, long time ago..."Stay away from the cheap 240v receptacles sold by the "orange box and blue box". There's a reason the good ones cost more. I have a "50 amp" Autel. You'll need bigger wiring (6 gauge) unless that 14-50 you have was wired oversized (few are).

If you think you might add back another Tesla, go for a Tesla chager that can be linked (again, hardwired). You can put two on the same circuit and "share the load", plugging in two vehicles at once and "forgetting about it" until you need one.

I know not of the auto open/close of which you speak. I have "MyQ" and I'm happy enough with pushing the garage door icon, then the specific door to be opened. I don't always park on the same side, I don't always want the door to open, and I frequently don't want it to close right away, so this isn't a problem for me. I can see how it might be if you're in an area where you want to get in and get the door closed ASAP. I'm frankly more perturbed by the "proximity unlock" feature of the Rivian that has me walking out of a restaurant to see the doors already unlocked and wondering how long they have been that way.

I like your idea on #6 !! My 2006 Mercedes 280SLK does this (but it's for window sealing with the folding hardtop, not air-tightness)
 

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Left button on steering wheel will toggle you to the last 15 minutes efficiency. I feel like the whole consumption thing could use some work. I tend to use one trip odometer a LOT, and leave the other one alone for "lifetime". Colder weather definitely impacts things. I haven't seen 2 mi/kw at all while the temps are low. I made a 30 mile trip in 17 degree weather and it was abysmal. A lot of people are saying "track it like you do your phone"...in other words, forget miles and start looking only at %.

Lose the 14-50 and go to a 48 amp charger hardwired. It's safer (watch Sandy Munro's YouTube video on this). Hardwired won't burn up the way non-Hubbell receptacles are prone to do. This is not just his "alarmist" POV...my electrician told me the same thing a long, long time ago..."Stay away from the cheap 240v receptacles sold by the "orange box and blue box". There's a reason the good ones cost more. I have a "50 amp" Autel. You'll need bigger wiring (6 gauge) unless that 14-50 you have was wired oversized (few are).

If you think you might add back another Tesla, go for a Tesla chager that can be linked (again, hardwired). You can put two on the same circuit and "share the load", plugging in two vehicles at once and "forgetting about it" until you need one.

I know not of the auto open/close of which you speak. I have "MyQ" and I'm happy enough with pushing the garage door icon, then the specific door to be opened. I don't always park on the same side, I don't always want the door to open, and I frequently don't want it to close right away, so this isn't a problem for me. I can see how it might be if you're in an area where you want to get in and get the door closed ASAP. I'm frankly more perturbed by the "proximity unlock" feature of the Rivian that has me walking out of a restaurant to see the doors already unlocked and wondering how long they have been that way.

I like your idea on #6 !! My 2006 Mercedes 280SLK does this (but it's for window sealing with the folding hardtop, not air-tightness)
I just figured out the left button efficiency chart a couple days ago after I saw someone’s picture of it on here somewhere. It helps. Showing minutes instead of miles seems strange to me but it’s better than nothing. I’m also using the trip meters like you.

I’ve been using the 14-50 for six years with my Tesla mobile charger and haven’t had any issues. I installed it with 6 gauge and it’s been flawless. Long term I’ll pull 100amp service to the garage and set a sub panel for additional charging options. I did that at our lake house garage and like the setup there a lot with the sub panel and outlets near the double doors. I can see where having the ability to charge at 48amps would be beneficial so we will see if we run into any situations where we need to use the local chargepoint. The tax credit would just about cover the cost of the charger and panel doing the work myself and the 25ft cord would be nice.

The prox and locking logic in general could use some work. I never used the prox on the Tesla because I hated having the handles constantly present when I was walking past the car in the garage. I like the disable prox at home on the Rivian but why doesn’t the lock after 2 minutes work at home too? Fix that part of the logic and I will be pretty happy. Oh just looked and the truck we been sitting in the garage for 2hrs plugged in and charging with the door handles presented!

You just reminded me we have MyQ on the other garage door for Amazon in home deliveries. I need to see if I can setup an IFTT automation to trigger the door. That just might work.
 

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I’ve been using the 14-50 for six years with my Tesla mobile charger and haven’t had any issues...
I would urge you to go forward with your wiring projecct. I've read (elsewhere) a reasonably sane comment that the duty cycle of a 14-50 plug/receptacle is about 400. They just aren't made for constant use (how many times in its life does a stove get plugged/unplugged?) Sandy Munro's YouTube video will make a believer out of you about wiring.
 
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