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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone, that has taken delivery or will soon, provide details about the home charger? If it arrived before/after the truck? Cost of installation. Installation process. Etc.

Thanks
 

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There's lots of information and manuals for the charger on Rivian's website: Rivian Wall Charger

Installation is going to be just like any other hardwired charger. Your electrical panel needs to be sized properly, you need a 60 amp breaker, and you need the proper wiring run from your breaker box to where you want to mount the charger. This requires a licensed electrician and the cost really depends on whether you need to upgrade your panel and how far and where you have to run the wire. There's plenty of information on the web about installing a hardwired charger and the costs involved - all of that applies to the Rivian charger as well.
 

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Not sure how further discussions would add anything - there are years of posts on thousands of forums talking about this exact thing. What brand of charger you use doesn't matter at all for this discussion.

The costs for the install can be from a few hundred to many thousands of dollars - it's totally dependent on what you need done. The wire alone could cost >$500 these days if you have a long run. You don't need a Rivian partner to do the work for you - treat it like any other home construction cost and get some recommendations and price quotes first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess I'm looking to find out if the charger is showing up at the same time of the delivery or if Rivian is saying it may be weeks or months before it's delivered even though it's worked into the purchase of the truck.
Also, does Rivian make the arrangements to install it or just say "here a few phone numbers, good luck". Rivian has a 5 year warranty and I'm assuming to keep that warranty it needs to be installed properly. Not by "my cousin" or anything like that. Or I'm guessing as long as the power source is there it's a easy bolt to the wall install?
I've read about the chargers and expected costs but haven't heard from anyone who has it installed.
 

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Not sure how further discussions would add anything - there are years of posts on thousands of forums talking about this exact thing. What brand of charger you use doesn't matter at all for this discussion.

The costs for the install can be from a few hundred to many thousands of dollars - it's totally dependent on what you need done. The wire alone could cost >$500 these days if you have a long run. You don't need a Rivian partner to do the work for you - treat it like any other home construction cost and get some recommendations and price quotes first.
Spoke with an electrician just last Thursday about some lighting instillation's in my home. As an aside discussed EV charger install....... he had installed more than a dozen Tesla chargers. Ball parked me at about $1400.00. He did mention how costly wire alone is lately. I'm probably going with Rivian wall charger. Due to take delivery of LE R1S in the June/July window.
 

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Although I had some coaching from a friend, I did the install myself. As suggested above, a 60 amp breaker is needed. I used #4 copper wire in 1” flexible conduit. #4 wire is quite stiff and just barely fits into the Rivian charger; it is probably overkill. I had a short distance, 6 feet, from fuse box to the charger.

I received my charger about a week or ten days ago.

I am going to the South San Francisco service facility to get my R1T on Thursday morning (YAHOO!).

Part of the reason I did the install myself is because I watched my Tesla charger being installed. It. Is basically work that an experienced handyman can do. To be on the safe side, I had an experienced electrician check the fittings and connections after I completed the hookup.

I do not plan to run my chargers at max rated amperage to keep heat low and get long battery life. Now I just need to get my R1T to see if the charger works properly!!
 

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Related: I'm completely clueless about the wiring discussion.
When we built our house about 6 years ago, I told the electrician that eventually I'd have an EV and so I wanted a 220V outlet in the garage. At the time, I had no idea what vehicle it would be but figured I'd hopefully save some time/money by having the outlet installed during construction.
What I have is a 50A 125/250V outlet. (see attached pic)
Question for those much smarter than me: Will this suffice to 'plug and play' the Rivian home charger? Or will I need additional wiring/work?
Thanks in advance!
Rectangle Font Circle Art Parallel
 

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Related: I'm completely clueless about the wiring discussion.
When we built our house about 6 years ago, I told the electrician that eventually I'd have an EV and so I wanted a 220V outlet in the garage. At the time, I had no idea what vehicle it would be but figured I'd hopefully save some time/money by having the outlet installed during construction.
What I have is a 50A 125/250V outlet. (see attached pic)
Question for those much smarter than me: Will this suffice to 'plug and play' the Rivian home charger? Or will I need additional wiring/work?
Thanks in advance!
View attachment 5028
That looks like a NEMA 14-50 outlet. You can plug the included/free Rivian Portable EVSE into that.

The Rivian Wall EVSE wouldn't directly plug into that outlet, as Rivian intends for it to be hardwired-only. You could use any of the plethora of aftermarket EVSEs that offer a NEMA 14-50 pigtail, however.

If you wanted to use the Rivian Wall EVSE you could either install a pigtail (Rivian doesn't recommend this, afaik, but it technically works), or you could remove the outlet and hardwire the EVSE using the existing circuit.

Just so you're aware, that outlet will limit you to 40A charging, since EVSE loads are considered "continuous" and must be de-rated (so a 50A circuit gets de-rated to 40A continuous load).
 

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That looks like a NEMA 14-50 outlet. You can plug the included/free Rivian Portable EVSE into that.

The Rivian Wall EVSE wouldn't directly plug into that outlet, as Rivian intends for it to be hardwired-only. You could use any of the plethora of aftermarket EVSEs that offer a NEMA 14-50 pigtail, however.

If you wanted to use the Rivian Wall EVSE you could either install a pigtail (Rivian doesn't recommend this, afaik, but it technically works), or you could remove the outlet and hardwire the EVSE using the existing circuit.

Just so you're aware, that outlet will limit you to 40A charging, since EVSE loads are considered "continuous" and must be de-rated (so a 50A circuit gets de-rated to 40A continuous load).
Awesome. Thanks!
 

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Awesome. Thanks!
Just to be safe, look at your fuse box and make sure that outlet has a 50 amp breaker. It will be labeled, if it is 50 amp you can charge at 40 amp.

They can also add that outlet on a 40 amp circuit if it has a 40 amp breaker you can only charge at 32 amps.

For charging, the continuous load can only be 80% of the rated circuit.
 

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Thanks.
It does have a 50 amp breaker, so I'm good on that front.
Again, I'm showing my ignorance, but I'm thinking I'll just have an electrician remove the current plug and do a hard-wire to the Rivian charger. Assuming that's possible? Am I still limited to max 40 amps?
Obviously, when I (finally) get the call from my guide, I assume they'll walk me through my options and can explain it to me like I'm 5 years old. :)
 

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Again, I'm showing my ignorance, but I'm thinking I'll just have an electrician remove the current plug and do a hard-wire to the Rivian charger. Assuming that's possible? Am I still limited to max 40 amps?
If you leave the 50A breaker, then yes you're limited to 40A charging.

IF the wiring that was used can support a 60A breaker, then the electrician can swap the breaker and then you can charge at 48A (max supported by Rivian). Your electrician can confirm what the wiring can handle.
 

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Keep in mind the Rivian home charger is hardwired only. The mobile charger obviously is not. I chose to go with the JuiceBox because I do not want hardwiring for this as the 60A isn't that much of a benefit.

Electrician took 13 weeks to be onsite to do the work (they are all so busy) cost $2,000.
Juicebox took 8 weeks to be delivered after I ordered and took minutes to install.
 

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Keep in mind the Rivian home charger is hardwired only. The mobile charger obviously is not. I chose to go with the JuiceBox because I do not want hardwiring for this as the 60A isn't that much of a benefit.

Electrician took 13 weeks to be onsite to do the work (they are all so busy) cost $2,000.
Juicebox took 8 weeks to be delivered after I ordered and took minutes to install.
That's good info.
When I price out the JuiceBox plugged into my 14-50 plug, I have to think it would be less overall since I wouldn't need an electrician.
Wondering about the difference in charge times between the 40A and 60A setup.
 

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That's good info.
When I price out the JuiceBox plugged into my 14-50 plug, I have to think it would be less overall since I wouldn't need an electrician.
Wondering about the difference in charge times between the 40A and 60A setup.
If you get a 40 amp plugin the difference will be ~20%. The Rivian on a 60 amp circuit will be able to use 48 amps to charge.

If the number Rivian shares is 25 mph at 48 amp the 40 amp will be about 20 miles an hour.
 

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If you already have the NEMA 14-50 then you're good to go - you don't really need the Rivian charger - it will just cost you a lot more to rip out the socket and breaker and potentially replace the wiring. Sure the Rivian charger will deliver 20% more current (which will charge your car 17% faster ...) but with the NEMA 14-50 you can buy any 40amp rated EVSE and just plug it in without hiring an electrician. Plus, if you ever sell your house, you can take your charger with you. Or if the charger breaks you can replace it without an electrician. And the outlet is useful for other things, like RVs or some shop tools.

If it were me I wouldn't buy anything right now - I would use the included charging cable and plug it into your 14-50 socket and see if that is sufficient for you. I think the included charging cable is limited to 32 amps, so you can use it but it won't give as much juice as a wall charger. You can always buy a wall charger (any brand) later if you find you need more current or if you need another feature that a wall charger can provide, such as timing your charging for off-peak electricity use.

The advantages of buying the Rivian charger now are 1) grandfathered into the old price, which is a good price, 2) good warranty, 5 years if you buy it with the car, 3) will deliver more current/shorter charge time, 4) integrated with the Rivian app. The downsides are 1) you will have to pay (could be a LOT) to hardwire it, 2) it's fixed to the house so you'll need a new one if you move.
 

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That's good info.
When I price out the JuiceBox plugged into my 14-50 plug, I have to think it would be less overall since I wouldn't need an electrician.
Wondering about the difference in charge times between the 40A and 60A setup.
a nema 14-50 is a 50AMP circuit, unless your panel is showing something different. That means it is 50A vs 60, with the rules of electricity you would get 40A to charge vs 48A. Really not a big difference, when you consider most of the time you are charging overnight.
 
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