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For anyone thinking about which wall charger they should get for their Rivian, Consumer Reports has a great article on their site for how to pick the right one.

The reviewed 7 different chargers with the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100 being their favorites.


The Chargers
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer. They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric-car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.

Staff Favorites
Our picks are the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and the Blink HQ 100.

JuiceBox 40
Price: $569

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon (32-amp hardwire)
Amazon (32-amp plug-in)
Amazon (40-amp hardwire)
Amazon (40-amp plug-in)

The midpriced JuiceBox 40 checks all the important boxes, making it an easy, versatile choice. This is a smart charger, with a dedicated app and WiFi connectivity, that can be scheduled to charge at off-peak times. It comes with a long 25-foot cable, adding flexibility to the mounting location. Plus, it can charge up to 40 amps, thereby reducing charge times. Installation is simple for this plug-in charger, and the power cord (from the outlet to the unit) is long, making it easy to find a suitable mounting location.

ChargePoint HomeFlex
Price: $699

Cord Length: 23 Feet

Resume Charging: No

Where to Buy: Amazon, ChargePoint, Home Depot

The ChargePoint brand is well-known for its public charging units; the compact HomeFlex is the residential model. We liked the HomeFlex’s compact and sleek design, quality craftsmanship, and attention to detail. Hooking and unhooking the coupler feels smooth and precise, and the holster is illuminated. The current can be ramped up to an impressive 50 amps. It connects to a WiFi network and can pair with a smartphone. The HomeFlex has an intuitive app that allows you to adjust the amps, among other things.

Blink HQ 100
Price: $400

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon

This solid, value-priced charger is wider than some other models. We found it easy to install and use. It has a handy hook for the relatively short 18-foot cable. This Blink has the ability to delay the start of charging in a direct, intuitive way by simply pressing a button on the control panel. It resumes charging automatically after a power outage. It charges at 30 amps; most non-Tesla EVs won’t benefit from a higher amperage because they can’t funnel a higher current.

The Other Chargers
Presented in alphabetical order.

ClipperCreek HCS-40/HCS-40P
Price: $565/$589

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy HCS-40: Amazon, ClipperCreek

Where to Buy HCS-40P: Amazon, ClipperCreek

ClipperCreek has been in the EVSE business from the start of the electric-car revolution. These two similar units differ in how they're hooked up. The HSC-40 needs to be hardwired; the HCS-40P simply plugs into a 240-volt outlet. (Note that the HCS-40P’s power supply cord is short.) These sturdy, weatherproof units are larger than most other EVSEs, and they have a long 25-foot charge cable. There's no app associated with them and no ability to delay charging.

Evo Charge

Price: $479

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon (18 ft.), Amazon (25 ft.)

The chief appeal of the Evo Charge is its compact size, which can be an advantage with tight installation spots. It's slim on features and has a couple shortcomings, namely a short 18-foot charge cable and an odd holster for the coupler. This rotates upward and requires an awkward angle to dock the coupler when unplugging the vehicle, and it seems fragile. The Evo has no associated app nor the ability to delay charging.

Siemens US2
Price: $412

Cord Length: 20 Feet

ResumeE Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon, Home Depot

The Siemens US2 is a wide unit, which may limit where it can be installed, and it has a rather short 20-foot cable. The control panel has a few cryptically labeled rubberized buttons. The model does have the ability to easily delay charging (2, 4, or 6 hours) to take advantage of lower rates during off-peak charging.

Tesla Mobile Charger Gen 2
Price: $275

Cord Length: 20 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Tesla

Tesla cars come with a Mobile Charger to enable them to recharge from any 120-volt outlet. It's common for Tesla owners to buy an additional one to keep mounted at home because it's a low-cost alternative to the hardwired Tesla Wall Connector ($500 plus installation). It comes with an interchangeable plug that’s compatible with a 240-volt NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50 outlet. The Mobile Charger is limited to a maximum of 32 amps, which provides 14 miles of range per hour of charging. It comes with just a 20-foot cable, and there's no hook to hang the charge cable. There's an adaptor available for $200 that allows Tesla chargers to connect to cars from other brands.

Tesla owners can try living with just a Mobile Charger by using the one that comes with their car. Those who routinely drive over 100 miles a day and don't want to use a public Tesla Supercharger may find the investment in a Wall Connector ($500) to be worthwhile. (The Wall Connector can be installed on a 48-amp circuit and pumps out 44 miles of range per hour.)

How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.
How We Tested
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer.
They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Surprised they didn't include Bosch in the review. Our dealer recommended it for durability, it's been great so far:

That's interesting that they didn't include it. Maybe they weren't able to get their hands on one for the review. How long have you had your Bosch? Has it given you any problems?
 

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Surprised they didn't include Bosch in the review. Our dealer recommended it for durability, it's been great so far:

That's interesting that they didn't include it. Maybe they weren't able to get their hands on one for the review. How long have you had your Bosch? Has it given you any problems?
Have had it almost two years. No problems. Use it for our Chevy Volts. Here is California, we have it mounted outdoors and it's handled our heat, fires/smoke, and rains just fine. Hasn't seen a flood, tidal wave, or asteroid yet, probably just a matter of time these days... Nice heavy duty 25' cable and J1772 connector too. Bought it online, you can get it directly from Bosch or Amazon. Not the cheapest, but definitely heavier duty than most.
 

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Surprised they didn't include Bosch in the review. Our dealer recommended it for durability, it's been great so far:


Have had it almost two years. No problems. Use it for our Chevy Volts. Here is California, we have it mounted outdoors and it's handled our heat, fires/smoke, and rains just fine. Hasn't seen a flood, tidal wave, or asteroid yet, probably just a matter of time these days... Nice heavy duty 25' cable and J1772 connector too. Bought it online, you can get it directly from Bosch or Amazon. Not the cheapest, but definitely heavier duty than most.
Sounds like a solid charger. Is it able to charge both your Volts at the same time or one at a time?
 

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Since I've decided to only buy EV's in the future...I had an extra 220 service run to the house...cost around $1,000. I installed 3 Tesla chargers in my garage using this new service. The reason I chose Tesla wall chargers was because they can network together and can move the amps around based upon how many of the chargers are in use at a single time. Then for non-Tesla EV's I've purchased Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapters. This way I can have my Model 3 and my Rivian R1T all charging at the same time - and even have one more for a future roadster (just dreaming on that one).
 

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Since I've decided to only buy EV's in the future...I had an extra 220 service run to the house...cost around $1,000. I installed 3 Tesla chargers in my garage using this new service. The reason I chose Tesla wall chargers was because they can network together and can move the amps around based upon how many of the chargers are in use at a single time. Then for non-Tesla EV's I've purchased Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapters. This way I can have my Model 3 and my Rivian R1T all charging at the same time - and even have one more for a future roadster (just dreaming on that one).
This might be the route I go with plans to own a second EV. Probably a Model 3 or Model Y.
Prior to that, JuiceBox EVSE for the Rivian R1T was one of my options. Still wasn't 100% if it was truly the best home EV charging stations to get.

Was the Model 3 your first EV or have you owned others in the past?
If so, what was your charging setup like?

BTW, welcome to the forum!
 

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This might be the route I go with plans to own a second EV. Probably a Model 3 or Model Y.
Prior to that, JuiceBox EVSE for the Rivian R1T was one of my options. Still wasn't 100% if it was truly the best home EV charging stations to get.

Was the Model 3 your first EV or have you owned others in the past?
If so, what was your charging setup like?

BTW, welcome to the forum!
Thanks for the welcome!

I owned a gen 1 Volt and then a gen 2 Volt (great car - if only they'd make a 100% EV version - I hated the looks of the Bolt). I don't remember the charger I had back then but I do remember it was round with a green face (I did a quick Google search and didn't see it so it might not be sold any longer. :))

If you only care about 2 cars (i.e. a 2 car garage) then any charger would probably do if you have a dedicated 100 Amp circuit (I think both would consume 48 Amps if I remember correctly). I have a 3 car garage and will - hopefully - soon have my M3P and a Rivian with the 400 mile battery pack. :) I can certainly envision a day for the sports car once my 14 year son is out of college. :) With 3 in play I really needed something that was capable of balancing the load - and I only saw that in the Tesla charger.
 

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I saw this posted on one of the Rivian Facebook groups. Here's what Rivian says about home charging.

788
 

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Since I've decided to only buy EV's in the future...I had an extra 220 service run to the house...cost around $1,000. I installed 3 Tesla chargers in my garage using this new service. The reason I chose Tesla wall chargers was because they can network together and can move the amps around based upon how many of the chargers are in use at a single time. Then for non-Tesla EV's I've purchased Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapters. This way I can have my Model 3 and my Rivian R1T all charging at the same time - and even have one more for a future roadster (just dreaming on that one).
Welcome @Mike_n_KY! Have you had any issues with your Lectron adapter? I'm curious about how well they for non teslas.
 

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Welcome @Mike_n_KY! Have you had any issues with your Lectron adapter? I'm curious about how well they for non teslas.
I've gotten the adapter but I haven't anything to use it on yet (so I can't answer your question). I did read reviews before buying it and they all sounded positive.
 

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I don't fully understand these things...

So, if I have a NEMA 14-50 (50 AMP) outlet run in my garage from my breaker box. By plugging one of these in to charge my Rivian, would I still in essence be using the onboard charger of the truck, which maxes out at 11 kWh? (ref: Rivian R1T 180 kWh charging cost and time calculator)

I guess I just don't want to put something in that is overkill, but want to make sure I'm putting something in that provides maximum charge!
 

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I don't fully understand these things...

So, if I have a NEMA 14-50 (50 AMP) outlet run in my garage from my breaker box. By plugging one of these in to charge my Rivian, would I still in essence be using the onboard charger of the truck, which maxes out at 11 kWh? (ref: Rivian R1T 180 kWh charging cost and time calculator)

I guess I just don't want to put something in that is overkill, but want to make sure I'm putting something in that provides maximum charge!
You would need a 46+A EVSE hardwired on a 60A circuit to max out the Rivians 11kW onboard Level 2 charger. Based on 450Wh/mi, this adds ~24 miles per hour of charging.

A 50A circuit to an outlet for a plug-and-cord EVSE will max out at around 40A (40A*240V = 9.6kW). Based on 450Wh/mi, this adds ~21 miles per hour of charging.

Given the relatively small marginal value verses the likely cost increase related to eking out that last little bit of capability, it seems reasonable to recommend the 50A outlet.
 

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I don't fully understand these things...

So, if I have a NEMA 14-50 (50 AMP) outlet run in my garage from my breaker box. By plugging one of these in to charge my Rivian, would I still in essence be using the onboard charger of the truck, which maxes out at 11 kWh? (ref: Rivian R1T 180 kWh charging cost and time calculator)

I guess I just don't want to put something in that is overkill, but want to make sure I'm putting something in that provides maximum charge!
My understanding is that the plug is needed for the charger to plug into so the charger can charge the Rivian. The other option is to have the charger hardwired in, but either way you need a charger. If Rivian is like everyone else, it'll probably only come with the 115v charger - which will take forever to charge such a large battery pack.

Having said that - I'm certainly no expert on these. :)
 

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My understanding is that the plug is needed for the charger to plug into so the charger can charge the Rivian. The other option is to have the charger hardwired in, but either way you need a charger. If Rivian is like everyone else, it'll probably only come with the 115v charger - which will take forever to charge such a large battery pack.

Having said that - I'm certainly no expert on these. :)
I've been under the "understanding" that there is actually an "on board" charger that when you plug the vehicle in with the supplied adapter what happens is electricity is supplied to the on-board charger and that feeds the batteries, BUT if you were to plug in an external charger (let's say like at a Tesla charging station) then the batteries are actually fed directly from that external charger as opposed to the on board charger.

In Rivian's case, according to this website (Rivian R1T 180 kWh charging cost and time calculator) the on board charger tops out at 11kW. But if you were to plug into a Supercharger the batteries can actually take a charge of 180kW.

So, do these home charging units actually charge the batteries or just supply electricity to the on board charger that in turn charges the batteries?

I hope I'm making sense here.... I very well could be completely off as I think it should be obvious I really don't know what the heck I'm talking about.... LOL. Thankfully we have this forum. :)
 

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Perhaps they are referring to the AC to DC converter or some type of regulator that the vehicle would need to have to handle different charge rates?
 

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I've been under the "understanding" that there is actually an "on board" charger that when you plug the vehicle in with the supplied adapter what happens is electricity is supplied to the on-board charger and that feeds the batteries, BUT if you were to plug in an external charger (let's say like at a Tesla charging station) then the batteries are actually fed directly from that external charger as opposed to the on board charger.

In Rivian's case, according to this website (Rivian R1T 180 kWh charging cost and time calculator) the on board charger tops out at 11kW. But if you were to plug into a Supercharger the batteries can actually take a charge of 180kW.

So, do these home charging units actually charge the batteries or just supply electricity to the on board charger that in turn charges the batteries?

I hope I'm making sense here.... I very well could be completely off as I think it should be obvious I really don't know what the heck I'm talking about.... LOL. Thankfully we have this forum. :)
It's why the home chargers are technically called EVSEs and not chargers. Level 1 (120V wall outlet) equipment and Level 2 (240V wall outlet or hardwire) equipment does some very rudimentary signaling to the vehicle's onboard charging telling it the max current it is allowed to take then closes the circuit to give the car the 120V or 240V. The charger in the car is responsible for managing its actual draw (based on the limit communicated from the EVSE), rectifying the AC power to DC, stepping up the voltage, etc etc.

The public DC fast chargers are actually chargers that bypass the onboard L1/L2 charger. I think early on, Rivian had said they'd support 160kW fast charging. It sounds like that they may have gotten that up to 300kW since it was first announced, but I also don't think they've committed to that yet.
 
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