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Since I've decided to only buy EV's in the future...I had an extra 220 service run to the house...cost around $1,000. I installed 3 Tesla chargers in my garage using this new service. The reason I chose Tesla wall chargers was because they can network together and can move the amps around based upon how many of the chargers are in use at a single time. Then for non-Tesla EV's I've purchased Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapters. This way I can have my Model 3 and my Rivian R1T all charging at the same time - and even have one more for a future roadster (just dreaming on that one).
We are doing the exact same thing.
 

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For anyone thinking about which wall charger they should get for their Rivian, Consumer Reports has a great article on their site for how to pick the right one.

The reviewed 7 different chargers with the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100 being their favorites.


The Chargers
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer. They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric-car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.

Staff Favorites
Our picks are the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and the Blink HQ 100.

JuiceBox 40
Price: $569

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon (32-amp hardwire)
Amazon (32-amp plug-in)
Amazon (40-amp hardwire)
Amazon (40-amp plug-in)

The midpriced JuiceBox 40 checks all the important boxes, making it an easy, versatile choice. This is a smart charger, with a dedicated app and WiFi connectivity, that can be scheduled to charge at off-peak times. It comes with a long 25-foot cable, adding flexibility to the mounting location. Plus, it can charge up to 40 amps, thereby reducing charge times. Installation is simple for this plug-in charger, and the power cord (from the outlet to the unit) is long, making it easy to find a suitable mounting location.

ChargePoint HomeFlex
Price: $699

Cord Length: 23 Feet

Resume Charging: No

Where to Buy: Amazon, ChargePoint, Home Depot

The ChargePoint brand is well-known for its public charging units; the compact HomeFlex is the residential model. We liked the HomeFlex’s compact and sleek design, quality craftsmanship, and attention to detail. Hooking and unhooking the coupler feels smooth and precise, and the holster is illuminated. The current can be ramped up to an impressive 50 amps. It connects to a WiFi network and can pair with a smartphone. The HomeFlex has an intuitive app that allows you to adjust the amps, among other things.

Blink HQ 100
Price: $400

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon

This solid, value-priced charger is wider than some other models. We found it easy to install and use. It has a handy hook for the relatively short 18-foot cable. This Blink has the ability to delay the start of charging in a direct, intuitive way by simply pressing a button on the control panel. It resumes charging automatically after a power outage. It charges at 30 amps; most non-Tesla EVs won’t benefit from a higher amperage because they can’t funnel a higher current.

The Other Chargers
Presented in alphabetical order.

ClipperCreek HCS-40/HCS-40P
Price: $565/$589

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy HCS-40: Amazon, ClipperCreek

Where to Buy HCS-40P: Amazon, ClipperCreek

ClipperCreek has been in the EVSE business from the start of the electric-car revolution. These two similar units differ in how they're hooked up. The HSC-40 needs to be hardwired; the HCS-40P simply plugs into a 240-volt outlet. (Note that the HCS-40P’s power supply cord is short.) These sturdy, weatherproof units are larger than most other EVSEs, and they have a long 25-foot charge cable. There's no app associated with them and no ability to delay charging.

Evo Charge

Price: $479

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon (18 ft.), Amazon (25 ft.)

The chief appeal of the Evo Charge is its compact size, which can be an advantage with tight installation spots. It's slim on features and has a couple shortcomings, namely a short 18-foot charge cable and an odd holster for the coupler. This rotates upward and requires an awkward angle to dock the coupler when unplugging the vehicle, and it seems fragile. The Evo has no associated app nor the ability to delay charging.

Siemens US2
Price: $412

Cord Length: 20 Feet

ResumeE Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon, Home Depot

The Siemens US2 is a wide unit, which may limit where it can be installed, and it has a rather short 20-foot cable. The control panel has a few cryptically labeled rubberized buttons. The model does have the ability to easily delay charging (2, 4, or 6 hours) to take advantage of lower rates during off-peak charging.

Tesla Mobile Charger Gen 2
Price: $275

Cord Length: 20 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Tesla

Tesla cars come with a Mobile Charger to enable them to recharge from any 120-volt outlet. It's common for Tesla owners to buy an additional one to keep mounted at home because it's a low-cost alternative to the hardwired Tesla Wall Connector ($500 plus installation). It comes with an interchangeable plug that’s compatible with a 240-volt NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50 outlet. The Mobile Charger is limited to a maximum of 32 amps, which provides 14 miles of range per hour of charging. It comes with just a 20-foot cable, and there's no hook to hang the charge cable. There's an adaptor available for $200 that allows Tesla chargers to connect to cars from other brands.

Tesla owners can try living with just a Mobile Charger by using the one that comes with their car. Those who routinely drive over 100 miles a day and don't want to use a public Tesla Supercharger may find the investment in a Wall Connector ($500) to be worthwhile. (The Wall Connector can be installed on a 48-amp circuit and pumps out 44 miles of range per hour.)

How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.
How We Tested
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer.
They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.
Thanks for the information really helpful! Jimmy what charger do you have? I’m new at this and working to get the 60amp breaker installed and the 220 outlet for the garage soon. Is that better than hardwired? Is that enough for two EV’s Im planning on a second as soon as the wife’s Subaru bites it.
 

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Great article, but I think they should have mentioned one other important factor in the purchase decision. Some utility companies are offering significant incentives for purchasing home-based level 2 chargers directly through them. For example, my public utility district (PUD) there is a $500 instant rebate on a pretty good selection of chargers, so I was able to purchase one for $150 after rebate. Hard to beat a deal like that. You should check with your local utility company before buying anything.
 

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Thanks for the information really helpful! Jimmy what charger do you have? I’m new at this and working to get the 60amp breaker installed and the 220 outlet for the garage soon. Is that better than hardwired? Is that enough for two EV’s Im planning on a second as soon as the wife’s Subaru bites it.
If you are going 60 amp, you need to hardwaire the charger. The only 60 amp plugs are commercial, and none of the EVSEs come with that type.

FYI, I have the ChargePoint Home Flex and am very happy with it. You can order it with either NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50, and it can also be hardwired. It alos has a 25foot cable, My old unit was a Blink with 18 foot cable and that was not adequate for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for the information really helpful! Jimmy what charger do you have? I’m new at this and working to get the 60amp breaker installed and the 220 outlet for the garage soon. Is that better than hardwired? Is that enough for two EV’s Im planning on a second as soon as the wife’s Subaru bites it.
I haven't decided yet but I think it's likely going to be the JuiceBox.
 

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Electrify America/Electrify home have a new home charger out called the HomeStation


Reston, VA (February 24, 2021) – Electrify Home today announced the launch of HomeStation, a sleek new Level 2 residential electric vehicle (EV) charger designed to make home charging more convenient than ever.

With adjustable charging power levels of up to 40 amps, professional and do-it-yourself installation options, and programmable WiFi features, customers will quickly find the HomeStation to be an essential everyday product that fits easily into their unique lifestyle. The ability to schedule charging times provides the ultimate flexibility and convenience, and can help customers save on energy costs by charging during off-peak hours where such utility rates are available.

Connected Capabilities
HomeStation customers will be able to rely on the Electrify America app for all their home and public charging needs. The HomeStation’s WiFi capabilities let users sync their product with the app - which can then be used to start and stop charging sessions remotely, schedule future home charging sessions, and view charging status and reminders. Switching back and forth between the public network of more than 2,400 chargers and the HomeStation unit is a breeze, helping keep track of all their charging history in one app.

HomeStation also allows for integration with Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant, so customers can use their favorite voice assistants to communicate easily with the HomeStation.

Faster Charging Speeds
Backed by the nation’s largest ultra-fast charging network, the HomeStation is the brand’s fastest home charger yet. Under the 40 amp configuration, the HomeStation can deliver charging speeds of up to 9.6kW – 6.8 times faster than on a Level 1 charger. This means capable vehicles can add up to 33 miles of range per hour while charging on the HomeStation.

“Today’s EV drivers are looking for charging solutions that fit seamlessly into their lifestyles, and we’re confident that the HomeStation will deliver that desired level of simplicity for their home charging needs,” said Nina Huesgen, senior manager, Home and eCommerce at Electrify America. “By giving drivers the freedom to control and customize their home charging experience through the same app they use to access our expanding public network, Electrify America is becoming a go-to source for all charging needs – whether at home or on the road.”

Cost Saving Options
The versatility of the HomeStation provides for flexible installation options that can save users money in the long run. The product can be installed with or without the help of a licensed professional, depending on the user’s comfort level. During installation, and with input from a licensed and qualified electrician, the amperage can be configured to deliver either 40, 32 or 16 amps to help avoid expensive upgrades to the home’s electrical panel. In addition, the ability to schedule charging through the Electrify America mobile app may allow users to take advantage of lower energy costs during off-peak hours where such utility rates are available.

Highlighted HomeStation Features:
  • Sleek New Design: HomeStation was styled by world renowned design and engineering firm Italdesign, and features a slim black silhouette that lights up blue while actively charging, and green to indicate readiness of use.
  • Ease of Use: The Level 2 charger can be installed indoors or outdoors, and includes a 24-foot charging cable to allow users to easily reach their EV for charging.
  • Flexible Installation: The supply power requirements are compatible with most electric dryer power circuits. The HomeStation can be plugged in using a NEMA 14-50 style plug or hardwired by a licensed and qualified electrician.
  • Tiered Installation Pricing: Customers choosing to have a professional electrician install their new Level 2 charger can choose among three different installation packages offered by Qmerit to select the one that best fits their installation needs. Custom installation services are also available. Packages begin at $695.
  • Adjustable Power: To help limit installation costs and possibly prevent panel upgrades, the charger’s maximum output can be configured during installation for 40 amps, 32 amps, or 16 amps to fit almost any home electrical panel rating. Desired output can be designated via the mobile app and with the input of a licensed and qualified electrician.
  • Customer Support: HomeStation includes a 3-year limited warranty on parts and 24-hour customer service via a dedicated Level 2 charging telephone number.
1544
 

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meh.

It seems to only go up to 40A (why not enable 48A when hardwired?) and the cord management isn't integral to the unit (looks like it could have been, but their pictures show a separate cable hook).

Not sure what this adds over the ChargePoint Home Flex?
 

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Not sure which wall charger to get. Assuming the Rivian charger will be connected to the Rivian app, rather than having another separate app (not a big deal though I guess). As long as the price is competitive. I just need to decide if I want it outside or in the garage.
 

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Would anyone here get by with the normal trickle charger? My business is 10 miles away, so my daily commute is only 20 miles... But if I go on a trip and deplete the battery on the way back it would take like 80 hours to charge it lol
 

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Would anyone here get by with the normal trickle charger? My business is 10 miles away, so my daily commute is only 20 miles... But if I go on a trip and deplete the battery on the way back it would take like 80 hours to charge it lol
You probably could. 12A * 120VAC = 1440W. Over a 10-hour charge, you're at 14.4kWh (less a little for inefficiency). At 450Wh/mi consumption, that's a bit over 30 miles of range. So after each 20-mile commute, you're up 10 miles of range on a 10-hour charge. As long as you live near enough a fast DC charger that you could buy some flexibility when you need it, you'd probably be just fine managing a 20-mile commute on a typical wall outlet (provided you don't have other things on the same circuit).
 

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You probably could. 12A * 120VAC = 1440W. Over a 10-hour charge, you're at 14.4kWh (less a little for inefficiency). At 450Wh/mi consumption, that's a bit over 30 miles of range. So after each 20-mile commute, you're up 10 miles of range on a 10-hour charge. As long as you live near enough a fast DC charger that you could buy some flexibility when you need it, you'd probably be just fine managing a 20-mile commute on a typical wall outlet (provided you don't have other things on the same circuit).
Or even installing a 220 volt plug. How many miles would that provide over 10 hours?

But I guess after the installation cost of a 220 volt plug/running wires might as well add the wall charger...
 

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You probably could. 12A * 120VAC = 1440W. Over a 10-hour charge, you're at 14.4kWh (less a little for inefficiency). At 450Wh/mi consumption, that's a bit over 30 miles of range. So after each 20-mile commute, you're up 10 miles of range on a 10-hour charge. As long as you live near enough a fast DC charger that you could buy some flexibility when you need it, you'd probably be just fine managing a 20-mile commute on a typical wall outlet (provided you don't have other things on the same circuit).
According to an IEEE study, Level 1 charging averages 83.8% efficiency. So that's 12A * 120VAC * 83.8% = 1206.72W. At average consumption of 450Wh/mi you gain approximately 2.6816 miles of range per hour.
 

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Or even installing a 220 volt plug. How many miles would that provide over 10 hours?

But I guess after the installation cost of a 220 volt plug/running wires might as well add the wall charger...
Level 2 charging averages an efficiency of 89.4%, according to a IEEE study. Using the Rivian-included EVSE that would be 32A * 240VAC * 89.4% = 6865.92W, which would give you approximately 15.2576 miles of range, per hour.

If you did a hardwired EVSE you could go as high as 48A * 240VAC * 89.4% = 10,298.88W, which would give you approximately 22.8864 miles of range, per hour.

There is a per-kWh cost difference between L1 and L2, because of difference in efficiency. Assuming a mile of range is 450Wh from the battery pack, you'll spin your meter approximately 536.9928Wh to gain that range at L1 charging. You'll spin your meter approximately 503.3557Wh to gain that same mile of range at L2 charging.

Costs for installing a wall-mount EVSE vary from $350 to $10k+, based primarily on what electrical work you need. I'm lucky, as my electrical panel is in my garage, and I'm comfortable adding the circuit, myself. Pulling a permit is inexpensive.
 

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Level 2 charging averages an efficiency of 89.4%, according to a IEEE study. Using the Rivian-included EVSE that would be 32A * 240VAC * 89.4% = 6865.92W, which would give you approximately 15.2576 miles of range, per hour.

If you did a hardwired EVSE you could go as high as 48A * 240VAC * 89.4% = 10,298.88W, which would give you approximately 22.8864 miles of range, per hour.

There is a per-kWh cost difference between L1 and L2, because of difference in efficiency. Assuming a mile of range is 450Wh from the battery pack, you'll spin your meter approximately 536.9928Wh to gain that range at L1 charging. You'll spin your meter approximately 503.3557Wh to gain that same mile of range at L2 charging.

Costs for installing a wall-mount EVSE vary from $350 to $10k+, based primarily on what electrical work you need. I'm lucky, as my electrical panel is in my garage, and I'm comfortable adding the circuit, myself. Pulling a permit is inexpensive.

hmm, didn't know there was only a 7 mile per hour difference between the Rivian included EVSE and the wall charger. My install would be about 20 feet from the panel. Other than more miles per hour, what would be another advantage of the wall charger vs the Rivian included EVSE.
 

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hmm, didn't know there was only a 7 mile per hour difference between the Rivian included EVSE and the wall charger. My install would be about 20 feet from the panel. Other than more miles per hour, what would be another advantage of the wall charger vs the Rivian included EVSE.
I think the biggest advantage is so that you can keep the included EVSE with the vehicle. Not that you're likely to ever need it, but it's right up there with a spare tire in terms of being useless if you didn't bring it with you.
 

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I think the biggest advantage is so that you can keep the included EVSE with the vehicle. Not that you're likely to ever need it, but it's right up there with a spare tire in terms of being useless if you didn't bring it with you.

Yes, I have forgotten my Volt's portable EVSE on family trips.

Would I be able to charge during off peak hours with the included EVSE? Maybe through the vehicle app? Or is that only possible with the wall charger?
 

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hmm, didn't know there was only a 7 mile per hour difference between the Rivian included EVSE and the wall charger. My install would be about 20 feet from the panel. Other than more miles per hour, what would be another advantage of the wall charger vs the Rivian included EVSE.
Mostly just convenience. I'm going to leave the included 32A EVSE in the Rivian (probably frunk) so I can use it when traveling or in an emergency.
 
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