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We'll have to wait for the app to confirm... But I'd expect this functionality will be available.

I'm thinking I can have the wall charger inside the garage and a 220 outside also. That way I don't have any cords going under the garage door. Will be switching between my Volt and Rivian so they will swap places in the garage. My wife wants me to sell the Volt, but I don't feel like using the Rivian as my daily commute car for now...
 

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I'm thinking I can have the wall charger inside the garage and a 220 outside also.
Sure, you could do that. Just make sure you have a nice weather-resistant housing that covers the outlet -- even when in use.

I'm going to mount my EVSE such that I can run it out to the driveway, if needed. If necessary, I can notch the weather-strip on the bottom of my garage door, in the corner, so the cable won't get chomped. I'd rather have my EVSE secure in my garage.
 

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Since I've decided to only buy EV's in the future...I had an extra 220 service run to the house...cost around $1,000. I installed 3 Tesla chargers in my garage using this new service. The reason I chose Tesla wall chargers was because they can network together and can move the amps around based upon how many of the chargers are in use at a single time. Then for non-Tesla EV's I've purchased Lectron - Tesla to J1772 Adapters. This way I can have my Model 3 and my Rivian R1T all charging at the same time - and even have one more for a future roadster (just dreaming on that one).
You are my new hero! I need to commit like you have! First EV purchase.
 

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Would I be able to charge during off peak hours with the included EVSE? Maybe through the vehicle app? Or is that only possible with the wall charger
With other EVs currently on sale you can set when and how much you want your EV to charge. I can't imagine Rivian not having this with their app and charging stations.
 

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If you guys could suggest a home charger brand for Rivian to partner up with, which one would it be?

I think this could be the best route when looking for some flexibility while still getting something specific to our vehicles.

Personally, I'd like to see chargepoint.
 

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If you guys could suggest a home charger brand for Rivian to partner up with, which one would it be?

I think this could be the best route when looking for some flexibility while still getting something specific to our vehicles.

Personally, I'd like to see chargepoint.
Rivian has already shown their residential EVSE. Why would they partner with another brand, at this point?
 

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If you guys could suggest a home charger brand for Rivian to partner up with, which one would it be?

I think this could be the best route when looking for some flexibility while still getting something specific to our vehicles.

Personally, I'd like to see chargepoint.
Buy a Chargepoint, it will work. No need for any partnership, J1772 standard simple works for any vehicle with that connector.
 

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I will ask an electrician, but just wanted a quick thought. My panel is rated for 200 amps. I know there are lots of extra spaces. Do I have space for a 60 amp breaker?
Yes, it is a double pole like the 50amp on the bottom right. You have plenty of room in the box and a 200 amp service is enough.
 

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I want to, but will depend on price, since I'm on an island, Hawaii, (where you can do 90 miles per day MAX and that's pushing it), so I guess the 220 outlet every night should be enough. But would still be nice to have.
 

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I will ask an electrician, but just wanted a quick thought. My panel is rated for 200 amps. I know there are lots of extra spaces. Do I have space for a 60 amp breaker?
You have the PHYSICAL space... but you also have a sub panel so we don’t know what your total electrical load is... you need to add it up and make sure you have headroom for another 60A circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I want to, but will depend on price, since I'm on an island, Hawaii, (where you can do 90 miles per day MAX and that's pushing it), so I guess the 220 outlet every night should be enough. But would still be nice to have.
Are you planning on getting the R1T or R1S? Either way the 220 outlet should be decent based on what you're saying. Are there any specific chargers you've been looking at?
 

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Have you used these chargers? Are they any good?
I haven use them myself, But I only heard good things about then so far. I chat with one of they owner, And he confirm me, that they are about to fully test a bi-directionel charger. Rivian had spoke about bi-directional charging in the pass, for they vehicules.
 

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For anyone thinking about which wall charger they should get for their Rivian, Consumer Reports has a great article on their site for how to pick the right one.

The reviewed 7 different chargers with the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100 being their favorites.


The Chargers
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer. They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric-car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.

Staff Favorites
Our picks are the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and the Blink HQ 100.

JuiceBox 40
Price: $569

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon (32-amp hardwire)
Amazon (32-amp plug-in)
Amazon (40-amp hardwire)
Amazon (40-amp plug-in)

The midpriced JuiceBox 40 checks all the important boxes, making it an easy, versatile choice. This is a smart charger, with a dedicated app and WiFi connectivity, that can be scheduled to charge at off-peak times. It comes with a long 25-foot cable, adding flexibility to the mounting location. Plus, it can charge up to 40 amps, thereby reducing charge times. Installation is simple for this plug-in charger, and the power cord (from the outlet to the unit) is long, making it easy to find a suitable mounting location.

ChargePoint HomeFlex
Price: $699

Cord Length: 23 Feet

Resume Charging: No

Where to Buy: Amazon, ChargePoint, Home Depot

The ChargePoint brand is well-known for its public charging units; the compact HomeFlex is the residential model. We liked the HomeFlex’s compact and sleek design, quality craftsmanship, and attention to detail. Hooking and unhooking the coupler feels smooth and precise, and the holster is illuminated. The current can be ramped up to an impressive 50 amps. It connects to a WiFi network and can pair with a smartphone. The HomeFlex has an intuitive app that allows you to adjust the amps, among other things.

Blink HQ 100
Price: $400

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon

This solid, value-priced charger is wider than some other models. We found it easy to install and use. It has a handy hook for the relatively short 18-foot cable. This Blink has the ability to delay the start of charging in a direct, intuitive way by simply pressing a button on the control panel. It resumes charging automatically after a power outage. It charges at 30 amps; most non-Tesla EVs won’t benefit from a higher amperage because they can’t funnel a higher current.

The Other Chargers
Presented in alphabetical order.

ClipperCreek HCS-40/HCS-40P
Price: $565/$589

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy HCS-40: Amazon, ClipperCreek

Where to Buy HCS-40P: Amazon, ClipperCreek

ClipperCreek has been in the EVSE business from the start of the electric-car revolution. These two similar units differ in how they're hooked up. The HSC-40 needs to be hardwired; the HCS-40P simply plugs into a 240-volt outlet. (Note that the HCS-40P’s power supply cord is short.) These sturdy, weatherproof units are larger than most other EVSEs, and they have a long 25-foot charge cable. There's no app associated with them and no ability to delay charging.

Evo Charge

Price: $479

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon (18 ft.), Amazon (25 ft.)

The chief appeal of the Evo Charge is its compact size, which can be an advantage with tight installation spots. It's slim on features and has a couple shortcomings, namely a short 18-foot charge cable and an odd holster for the coupler. This rotates upward and requires an awkward angle to dock the coupler when unplugging the vehicle, and it seems fragile. The Evo has no associated app nor the ability to delay charging.

Siemens US2
Price: $412

Cord Length: 20 Feet

ResumeE Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon, Home Depot

The Siemens US2 is a wide unit, which may limit where it can be installed, and it has a rather short 20-foot cable. The control panel has a few cryptically labeled rubberized buttons. The model does have the ability to easily delay charging (2, 4, or 6 hours) to take advantage of lower rates during off-peak charging.

Tesla Mobile Charger Gen 2
Price: $275

Cord Length: 20 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Tesla

Tesla cars come with a Mobile Charger to enable them to recharge from any 120-volt outlet. It's common for Tesla owners to buy an additional one to keep mounted at home because it's a low-cost alternative to the hardwired Tesla Wall Connector ($500 plus installation). It comes with an interchangeable plug that’s compatible with a 240-volt NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50 outlet. The Mobile Charger is limited to a maximum of 32 amps, which provides 14 miles of range per hour of charging. It comes with just a 20-foot cable, and there's no hook to hang the charge cable. There's an adaptor available for $200 that allows Tesla chargers to connect to cars from other brands.

Tesla owners can try living with just a Mobile Charger by using the one that comes with their car. Those who routinely drive over 100 miles a day and don't want to use a public Tesla Supercharger may find the investment in a Wall Connector ($500) to be worthwhile. (The Wall Connector can be installed on a 48-amp circuit and pumps out 44 miles of range per hour.)

How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.
How We Tested
The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer.
They cost $300 to $700.
To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.
I have a Tesla Model 3 and a Rivian R1S on order. My family is new to the EV game. After some research on at home chargers, we installed a NEMA 14-50 (50A) outlet at home. We called our electric company (Southern California Edison) and got on the EV rate ($0.17 kWh after 9pm-8am). We will go with the NeoCharge smart splitter. You’re able to charge 2 EVs at once. Either set a priority to one car then the other. For instance, I commute 35miles to downtown LA. I’m the first to leave, so I’ll set my car to charge first then the family car (as it’s used later). OR you can charge both at the same time at 20A each instead of one at 40A. I didn’t want to pay for another breaker install since I was maxed out on my 200A panel.
 
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