Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner

Is the environment your main reason for buying a Rivian?

  • Yes

    Votes: 36 24.7%
  • No

    Votes: 110 75.3%
21 - 40 of 68 Posts

·
Registered
2019 Zero SR/F and 2018, BMW i3
Joined
·
320 Posts
I must say that if environment was the main concern given my needs, I would have bought a minivan and using the extra 40k planting some trees. Or buying the carbon credits. Seriously, check the price of carbon offsets in a place like Terrapass: Buy Carbon Offsets to Reduce Carbon Footprint. It is pretty cheap.

Of course if you are already buying a large truck that costs you 80k+. Sure, you can buy electric and help the environment. But paying 20k or 30k, or 40k extra to save the environment makes no sense. Just save the money and buy the credits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Thanks for starting this thread. I'm all in on EVs for a few reasons, with the primary reason to help move towards sustainability. Having said that, Rivian makes big vehicles and are not really the most effiecient if sustainability is your primary motivation. But I think that any purchase of an EV now helps move the auto industry towards sustainability and it will become more efficient over time. We have a reservation for an R1S and honestly it's more than we need, but there is no other SUV out there that is an EV and capable of off road. I don't need 4 motors, and would be happy with the two motor version but can't wait that long (or current vehicle is at over 150k and won't last that long). Secondarily, my reason to drive EVs is the geopolitics of oil. The climate change side of oil consumption is bad enough on its own, but the geopolitics of oil production/consumption and wealth (plus the fouling of land, water and air from oil production) distorts policy and empowers dictators and autocrats, as well as environmental policy in the U.S.. In short, there are many good reasons to drive an EV, even if climate change isn't the primary reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Great points, @materas!
I think the artiles MilesK shared at the start of the thread shows something interesting and I get why Polestar was keen to get that news out, but as eveyone else points out, it's just so much more nuanced than yes or no.
Replacing ICE cars with EVs is better for emmissions in the medium-to-long-run, but that's just one part of the puzzle. They certainly won't help with sprawl, congestion, road wear and maintenance, the list of problems goes on.
So driving a Rivian doesn't save the planet, but it helps a bit. I guess. And I'm more and more in the camp that we can't live perfectly, but we can all make little changes to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
If one is really concerned for the environment consider a switch over to bike commuting. I know at least a dozen people that commute to and from work every day of the year rain/snow/shine here in Alaska. One guy I know has been doing it for >20 years.

my brother in DC has switched to bike commuting most of the time with a pedal assist eBike. Says it is great because on full boost he can run 20-25 mph and not break a sweat. And with traffic the way it is in DC it takes less time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
my brother in DC has switched to bike commuting most of the time with a pedal assist eBike. Says it is great because on full boost he can run 20-25 mph and not break a sweat. And with traffic the way it is in DC it takes less time.
In DC I'd say a bike or scooter is faster than a car.

I've driven my R1T there... Some of those parking garages are just not possible to maneuver a R1T in.
 

·
Registered
R1S Adventure ordered 10/27/2021), Red, Large battery (want Max, tho)
Joined
·
94 Posts
1) The power! Wow!
2) The convenience of not having a ICE
- No need to fill up
- No oil changes
- Fewer moving parts
3) The tech
4) The styling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
If one is really concerned for the environment consider a switch over to bike commuting. I know at least a dozen people that commute to and from work every day of the year rain/snow/shine here in Alaska. One guy I know has been doing it for >20 years.

my brother in DC has switched to bike commuting most of the time with a pedal assist eBike. Says it is great because on full boost he can run 20-25 mph and not break a sweat. And with traffic the way it is in DC it takes less time.
This is a very meaningful and thoughtful comment. I grew up in a city where biking was very normal and then moved to one where it's dangerous. I've made all sorts of excuses to myself and your friend in the mean time is biking in Alaska year round! My office is, at best, 1.5 miles from my house. I have contemplated biking for the exercise but never considered the environmental impact. I'm thankful to be a part of this group of people that are this thoughtful and inspire other to be better. Cheers mate!
 

·
Registered
Tesla Model Y LR 2020; Rivian R1T Adventure 2022 (Reservation)
Joined
·
33 Posts
US energy independence. The environmental benefits come along for the ride, so:
View attachment 7240
Wouldn't it be amazing if we could produce so much electricity through renewable sources that the notion of "energy efficient appliances" was no longer necessary? Residential electricity could be "free" (some large quantity free, then large costs beyond the free amount). People would be buying up EVs like crazy. We'd have no use for coal or crude oil. We'd be selling it all to other countries and making massive national income off of them.

Cover all the massive parking lots with solar panels. That's where it starts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
This is a very meaningful and thoughtful comment. I grew up in a city where biking was very normal and then moved to one where it's dangerous. I've made all sorts of excuses to myself and your friend in the mean time is biking in Alaska year round! My office is, at best, 1.5 miles from my house. I have contemplated biking for the exercise but never considered the environmental impact. I'm thankful to be a part of this group of people that are this thoughtful and inspire other to be better. Cheers mate!
I’m ~6 miles from work and bike commute ~75% of the time. Winter is easier (thanks to fat tire bikes and studs) then the spring mud season. It is my way of making sure I get some exercise in and cut down on environmental impact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Wouldn't it be amazing if we could produce so much electricity through renewable sources that the notion of "energy efficient appliances" was no longer necessary? Residential electricity could be "free" (some large quantity free, then large costs beyond the free amount). People would be buying up EVs like crazy. We'd have no use for coal or crude oil. We'd be selling it all to other countries and making massive national income off of them.

Cover all the massive parking lots with solar panels. That's where it starts.
My solar system generated 222kWh of energy today.

The average US household utilizes 30kWh/day.

One of the least efficient EVs, the R1T would use 16kWh/day based on 12,000 miles annually

What’s an energy efficient appliance?
 

·
Registered
Tesla Model Y LR 2020; Rivian R1T Adventure 2022 (Reservation)
Joined
·
33 Posts
My solar system generated 222kWh of energy today.

The average US household utilizes 30kWh/day.

One of the least efficient EVs, the R1T would use 16kWh/day based on 12,000 miles annually

What’s an energy efficient appliance?
That's a LOT of power production. Congratulations!

I'd say anything that is EnergyStar compliant would be classified as an energy efficient appliance :D

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
My solar system generated 222kWh of energy today.

The average US household utilizes 30kWh/day.

One of the least efficient EVs, the R1T would use 16kWh/day based on 12,000 miles annually

What’s an energy efficient appliance?
how big is Your array? Is it movable? I have a 7.3 kw system. Panels cover the entire south by SW facing roof of my 3 car garage, covers 500 ft^2. I make 40-50 kWh when we have 20 hours of sunlight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I'd say anything that is EnergyStar compliant would be classified as an energy efficient appliance :D
I was supporting your statement :)
My kids will never know what it’s like to get yelled at to turn off the lights.

how big is Your array? Is it movable? I have a 7.3 kw system. Panels cover the entire south by SW facing roof of my 3 car garage, covers 500 ft^2. I make 40-50 kWh when we have 20 hours of sunlight.
I actually have 2 systems. First one is a 9.7kW. Second one is a 30.24kW.

Both non moveable ground mount systems. It was more cost efficient to get fixed mounts and more panels than to deals with a tracking system.

First one was my dabble (for the house) Then I moved everything electric (well water, septic, heat pump, electric oven, stove, heat pump water heater, EV cars) and added the second one when I realized it was the most cost efficient way to live my life. My monthly reoccurring bills = mortgage. No utilities, no gas. By my estimates doing so basically moved my retirement up by almost 10 years because of the much smaller cash flow requirement.

I wish I got 20 hours of sun, I’d get away with a much smaller array. But instead this is my monster:

Solar power Solar panel Plant Solar energy Solar dish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I was supporting your statement :)
My kids will never know what it’s like to get yelled at to turn off the lights.



I actually have 2 systems. First one is a 9.7kW. Second one is a 30.24kW.

Both non moveable ground mount systems. It was more cost efficient to get fixed mounts and more panels than to deals with a tracking system.

First one was my dabble (for the house) Then I moved everything electric (well water, septic, heat pump, electric oven, stove, heat pump water heater, EV cars) and added the second one when I realized it was the most cost efficient way to live my life. My monthly reoccurring bills = mortgage. No utilities, no gas. By my estimates doing so basically moved my retirement up by almost 10 years because of the much smaller cash flow requirement.

Both non moveable ground mount systems. It was more cost efficient to get fixed mounts and more panels than to deals with a tracking system. I wish I got 20 hours of sun, I’d get away with a much smaller array. But instead this is my monster:

View attachment 7283
Wow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
On a long bright summer day I’ve peaked around ~140kwh out of my 18kw system. Our electric bill is $17 (the meter charge) for 9-10 months out of the year. We usually get a small check from the utility in late spring when they “zero out” the small amount of energy we’ve banked coming out of winter. SREC payments, while not high here in PA, are nice bits of occasional found money, too. None of this is a significant factor to my retirement age though, so hats off to @Yellowbuddy! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
On a long bright summer day I’ve peaked around ~140kwh out of my 18kw system. Our electric bill is $17 (the meter charge) for 9-10 months out of the year. We usually get a small check from the utility in late spring when they “zero out” the small amount of energy we’ve banked coming out of winter. SREC payments, while not high here in PA, are nice bits of occasional found money, too. None of this is a significant factor to my retirement age though, so hats off to @Yellowbuddy! :)
In PA SRECs are tough. I live in a very SREC friendly state, which helps tremendously, issues 1 per 1 MWh generated. On average it’s $225/SREC.

Unfortunately excess energy is sold back at a wholesale rate of only $0.03/kWh so that doesn’t make a huge impact for me. It’s mostly the SRECs. The monthly checks from those are equal to about half of what my wife brings home working an under appreciated government job.

We then take those checks and have been putting them into an SP500 index fund. It’s really worked to address both sides of the equation. Expense reduction as well as income generation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
In PA SRECs are tough. I live in a very SREC friendly state, which helps tremendously, issues 1 per 1 MWh generated. On average it’s $225/SREC.

Unfortunately excess energy is sold back at a wholesale rate of only $0.03/kWh so that doesn’t make a huge impact for me. It’s mostly the SRECs. The monthly checks from those are equal to about half of what my wife brings home working an under appreciated government job.

We then take those checks and have been putting them into an SP500 index fund. It’s really worked to address both sides of the equation. Expense reduction as well as income generation.
Nice set up! I had enough roof space for a 12kw. However Here in my muni there is a regulation where if I sell back >10% for 2 consecutive months they can make me remove panels. In Alaska I get long days in the summer but very short days (4-5 hrs of daylight) in the winter and get a ton of snow. With my set up my power bill is <$70 7-9 months a year (depending on how much I remove snow from them). ~3 months a year I make almost nothing so it is ~$350-400. My system also functions off grid with a secondary breaker panned and battery bank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
What ar you using for that? I have SMA Sunny Islands, but Ill need to replace the old AGMs soon
I did the system myself ~7 years ago. My inverter is a Schneider XW hybrid. I have ~40kwh of battery bank, USbattery 12v AGMs. The batteries are wired to a 2ndary braker panel that just power the essentials: well pump, heat (well water pumps and boiler, main heat is NG), kitchen, freezers,…. I initially did a minimal battery bank as At the time I knew batteries were getting better. In the dead of winter with no solar these last me 2-3 days. I’m starting to look at what I will do to replace my AGMs. I also have a 9k generator that can charge the batteries if we are in the time of year where we don’t make from solar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I did the system myself ~7 years ago. My inverter is a Schneider XW hybrid. I have ~40kwh of battery bank, USbattery 12v AGMs. The batteries are wired to a 2ndary braker panel that just power the essentials: well pump, heat (well water pumps and boiler, main heat is NG), kitchen, freezers,…. I initially did a minimal battery bank as At the time I knew batteries were getting better. In the dead of winter with no solar these last me 2-3 days. I’m starting to look at what I will do to replace my AGMs. I also have a 9k generator that can charge the batteries if we are in the time of year where we don’t make from solar.
Similiar, I’m running a critical loads panel with a 48v DC/DC generator for when my solar is down for more than 3 days.

I’ve been eyeing the server rack LifePo4 batteries. A smaller pack, maybe 10-15kW just to act as a buffer for the amperage draw. Then use the F-150L to supplement that bank when it drops below 50% and no sun, before the DC generator kicks on.
 
21 - 40 of 68 Posts
Top