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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Kia EV9 has always seemed to be a competitor to the R1S, but this is the first article that I'm aware of.to specifically state as much. The EV9 will not have the same off-road capability as the R1S, but given that the majority of SUV owners operate their vehicles exclusively on pavement, that may not matter much. In terms of looks, the vehicle in the photos is camouflaged, so it's difficult to tell how much different the production EV9 is from the concept vehicle. Its outlines clearly indicate the influence of the Telluride styling team however, not a bad thing IMO.

The EV9 is probably a more direct competitor for the upcoming dual-motor Rivian R1S, both from the capability and cost perspective. The Kia is significantly slower to 60 mph than the R1S, 5 vs 3 seconds, but will have somewhat greater range than the current LR, and substantially faster charging. The article says merely that EV9 pricing will be less than the R1S (@$78,000) however, other articles speculate that the Kia's starting price will be in the $50k range.

With the EV9 set to go on sale next year, it's pretty clear that Rivian will not have the larger SUV - BEV space to itself for long.


Kia teases new EV9 images, its answer to the Rivian R1S with AWD, 3rd row, and more

by Scooter Doll Aug. 25th 2022 8:06 am PT

Kia continues to tease the public with its EV9 SUV – the automaker’s next all-electric vehicle to join the lineup as a competitor to SUVs like the Rivian R1S. The camouflaged version of the EV9 can be seen enduring final testing before it makes its global debut next year. Here’s the latest.

The Kia EV9 will emerge as the second all-electric model donning the Korean automaker’s new “EV” series nomenclature. It is preceded by the EV6 crossover, which hit the market earlier this year and has been met with positive feedback from consumers with its roomy interior and advanced charging tech thanks to Hyundai Motor Group’s 800V E-GMP platform.

At the LA Auto Show last November, Kia and Hyundai showcased several concept EVs that will eventually sit atop the E-GMP platform, which included the EV9 – an all-electric full-size SUV.

During an Investor Day event this past March, Kia shared more details of the EV9, which will be able to accelerate 0-100km/h (0-62 mph) in five seconds, deliver about 336 miles (540 km) on a full charge, and garner 100 km (62 miles) of range in six minutes.

Kia expects new models like the EV6 and EV9 to significantly contribute to its overall sales and aims to sell 807,000 units in 2026, followed by 1.2 million in 2030. As the global debut of the EV9 approaches early next year, Kia has shared an update to its progress. Have a gander.

Kia EV9
Source: Kia
EV9 enters final testing program as Kia’s “flagship model”

As you can see from the latest images above, the Kia EV9 appears on track (no pun intended) to begin production next year and is expected to arrive as a game changer for not only the automaker, but for the electrified SUV segment as well.

According to Kia’s latest press release, camo’d versions of the EV9 have been undergoing their “final intensive testing program,” pushing the SUV to its limits of durability. Per the release:
During this final testing phase, the EV9 is relentlessly subjected to a grueling verification program. Testing on a 4WD climbing hill and rough terrain tracks, as well as deep-water wading, will ensure maximum reliability even in the most challenging conditions. Kia’s high-speed, handling, and low-friction tracks place every element of the EV9’s performance and roadholding under the strictest scrutiny. At the same time, ‘Belgian pavé’ cobbled road surfaces enable Kia’s engineers to subject the EV9’s ride comfort and build quality to the harshest possible trials. In addition to the test program at Namyang R&D centre, like every Kia model, the EV9 has also been subjected to a punishing testing regimen in locations all over the globe.
The upcoming SUV was developed over the course of 44 months and will include features vital to compete in the blossoming large EV segment today. This includes all-wheel drive, third-row seating, and plenty of cargo space (to what extent must be confirmed).

When it debuts in Q1 of 2023, we can expect the EV9 to offer a counter option to the Rivian R1S SUV, which is slowly but surely rolling out deliveries among supply chain and assembly efficiency issues over at Rivian HQ.

While the R1S could easily be considered one of the best SUVs ever made to date, its MSRP starts at a lofty $78,000. Kia has not yet shared pricing for the EV9, but we’d expect the automaker to try and deliver its own SUV option at a lower price point for consumers.

We are certain to learn more following the global debut on the Kia EV9 in 2023. Circle back with Electrek for the latest.
 

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Count me as a possible customer for the EV9. A lot will depend on off-road chops. I don't expect it to be up to R1S standards, but close would be good enough. After that, it all comes down to which is available first. Eight months ago my estimated R1S delivery date was the first-half 2023. Now it's slipped to waiting-to-be-told-how-long-I'll-be-waiting. If an off-road competent EV9 can be had sooner than the Rivian, then I'm out.
 

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This SUV for $65K; 300-350 mile range and the ability to charge from 20% to 80% in 15 minutes due to its 800V architecture, along with a fully built out dealership/service network will sell like hotcakes!
Yeah no doubt. The Kia EV6 is already selling well enough.
EV9 should have no problem performing equally as well. Go Kia!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do we know why no one has been able to break the barrier of 300-350 mile range? is it just battery capacity limitations?
The Tesla Model S has just over 400 miles of range and the Lucid Air something like 520 miles. Given that both are pretty pricey, it looks like one of the biggest barriers to extended range is cost. Another case in point, the Max option for the R1T; though it extends range to over 400 miles, it adds $16k to the price.

Current battery technology is certainly a range-limiting factor, but so are drag, mass and efficiency. Aptera has concentrated on the last three elements and will introduce its two-seater, three-wheel EV next year with 400 miles of range for under $35k. They have 600 and 1,000 mile versions in the wings with planned 2024 introductions for those models. Another interesting feature common to all models is built-in solar charging. Aptera claims that, depending on your location and the solar config chosen, you can get up to 40 miles of range every day via the sun. That could make the car a great commuter vehicle for many. The styling is very Jetson's-like, so not for everyone and the three-wheel design will also put folks off.
 

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Count me as a possible customer for the EV9. A lot will depend on off-road chops. I don't expect it to be up to R1S standards, but close would be good enough. After that, it all comes down to which is available first. Eight months ago my estimated R1S delivery date was the first-half 2023. Now it's slipped to waiting-to-be-told-how-long-I'll-be-waiting. If an off-road competent EV9 can be had sooner than the Rivian, then I'm out.
Pretty much been reported in the few articles about the EV9 that this will not be an ‘off-road’ oriented vehicle; and tbh since Kia will sell every one they make I’m not sure adding weight; cost, etc. to enhance it’s off road chops make much sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pretty much been reported in the few articles about the EV9 that this will not be an ‘off-road’ oriented vehicle; and tbh since Kia will sell every one they make I’m not sure adding weight; cost, etc. to enhance it’s off road chops make much sense.
Everything I read about the EV9 indicates that it will be the electric version of the Telluride. That means a vehicle with somewhat limited off-roading capability, but decent performance in inclement weather. I actually have a Telluride and it has been great in the snow and for hauling our small camper on rutted fire roads. I don't think you can expect much more than that with the EV9, though it may be a bit more capable. It will not however be in the R1S's league when it comes to off-roading, so if you plan of lot of that, you'll be much better off waiting for the Rivian.

That said, the EV9 seems pretty impressive, particularly with respect to charging. If Kia manages to build it to the same standards as the Telluride, it will be a fantastic vehicle for the 80-90 percent of those who use a mid-sized SUV only occasionally (for many, never) on gravel and dirt roads, and don't plan to head into the wilderness.
 

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Do we know why no one has been able to break the barrier of 300-350 mile range? is it just battery capacity limitations?
From what I have read is that it is just not necessary to have longer range. The added weight of more batteries decreases efficiency and with charging station locations becoming ever more convenient and charging speeds increasing there is no need to have longer range. When modeling long distance road trips in a 250 mile vs 400 mile range Tesla, the overall travel time could be considered negligible. So the only specific use case that would benefit would be a person with a 400+ mile daily commute, or someone looking to go way off the beaten path with no access to chargers like over-landing, both niche customers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
From what I have read is that it is just not necessary to have longer range. The added weight of more batteries decreases efficiency and with charging station locations becoming ever more convenient and charging speeds increasing there is no need to have longer range. When modeling long distance road trips in a 250 mile vs 400 mile range Tesla, the overall travel time could be considered negligible. So the only specific use case that would benefit would be a person with a 400+ mile daily commute, or someone looking to go way off the beaten path with no access to chargers like over-landing, both niche customers.
I think you can add towing, and use in temperature extremes, especially extended sub-zero F conditions, as reasons for wanting greater battery capacity.
 

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After driving 2 Teslas for 6 years, 300 miles is the sweet spot for trips. Higher speeds do lower the range, however they tend to occur on freeways. The Supercharger network is the key for Tesla. Rivian needs to get busy and match Tesla, whether through its own charging network, or with a partner, or both.
 

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They "teased" their new SUV by releasing clear photos of it from multiple angles, but in the camo wrap...

The camo wrap is the stupidest thing. It doesn't hide any shapes or features from competitors, it just makes the potential consumers you're trying to get pumped up think your car has an ugly paint job.
 
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