Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ChargePoint Flex instructions: “ will need to be installed by a licensed electrician who will ensure that your breaker and wire dishing is appropriate… also need to adjust amperage.”

this install seems much like wiring done for the dryer or the oven or the hot tub….

Have you found that you needed a licensed electrician to install this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I don't know one way or another if it's strictly required.
My concern would be that if something went wrong down the line (unusually high battery degradation, vehicle refuses to charge, etc.), would Rivian or the EVSE manufacturer have any leg to stand on in trying to wash their hands of responsibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know one way or another if it's strictly required.
My concern would be that if something went wrong down the line (unusually high battery degradation, vehicle refuses to charge, etc.), would Rivian or the EVSE manufacturer have any leg to stand on in trying to wash their hands of responsibility.
Yeah, I’ve been reading the warranty fine print. I think a licensed electrician helps protect a bit with ensuring installation is per ChargePoint requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
I don't know one way or another if it's strictly required.
My concern would be that if something went wrong down the line (unusually high battery degradation, vehicle refuses to charge, etc.), would Rivian or the EVSE manufacturer have any leg to stand on in trying to wash their hands of responsibility.
Legally, no. They'd have to demonstrate that improper installation caused the fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
"Need" is a strong word.

I suspect almost everyone on this forum possesses the necessary skill with a screwdriver to do this. But I also suspect that most have just enough knowledge about electrical codes to be dangerous.

My suggestion is, get an electrician - an electrician will know the codes, know what permits are needed, and install it correctly. The last thing you want to do (I assume) is create an unnecessary elevated risk of fire by sizing the panel wrong, using the wrong breaker, using the wrong wire type, using the wrong conduit, not protecting the wire properly where it runs through walls, not supporting the conduit properly, etc. etc. I'm sure you can figure out most of this if you spend enough time researching, but even then how do you know you're not missing something so simple that all those internet videos neglect to even mention it?

Note a lot of places offer rebates for EV chargers and installations (my electric company paid me $600 to purchase and install an EV charger!), and these typically require installation by a licensed electrician.

The problem I had was finding an electrician who would do the install for a reasonable fee. My install was about 1 hour of work with about $75 of materials. Most places wanted to charge upwards of $600 for that. And while I value the knowledge and training of a licensed electrician, that expertise is not worth $500/hour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
It depends on your jurisdiction. Some allow homeowners to DIY electrical work and some do not. You will want this work to be permitted and legal in your jurisdiction because if the worst happens and you suffer a loss (e.g. fire) insurance will almost certainly not cover you if the work was not done legally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
Legally, no. They'd have to demonstrate that improper installation caused the fault.
I wish people would stop with the jailhouse lawyer arguments. If a licensed electrician did the work, then "they" wouldn't have a cause to deny your warranty claim or your fire insurance claim. If however you did the work yourself, and they denied the claim, then it's up to you to file a lawsuit. And how long do you think it would take for a competent lawyer to demonstrate on the stand that you don't know all the relevant code?

I am not a lawyer, nor are the "do-it-yourself they can't prove it" advocates. Just because something is "not illegal" doesn't mean it's "a good idea".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
I wish people would stop with the jailhouse lawyer arguments. If a licensed electrician did the work, then "they" wouldn't have a cause to deny your warranty claim or your fire insurance claim. If however you did the work yourself, and they denied the claim, then it's up to you to file a lawsuit. And how long do you think it would take for a competent lawyer to demonstrate on the stand that you don't know all the relevant code?

I am not a lawyer, nor are the "do-it-yourself they can't prove it" advocates. Just because something is "not illegal" doesn't mean it's "a good idea".
You're saying that a company can't deny a claim because XYZ electrician did the work (allegedly, right? They don't actually know) but that they will deny a claim because you DIY the install? That's laughable.

The company either will or will not deny the claim. Period. It doesn't matter who did the work. If you think they'll deny you even when you do everything right (or paid an electrician to do everything for you) then you will have to go to court. Period.

And this isn't unique to warranty issues, btw. That's just how the American system works. If two parties can't agree, then the courts are how you compel them.

FWIW, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is one of the laws that can protect you. It states that the onus is on the manufacturer to demonstrate the product was abused or improperly installed/used.

You can never guarantee that you wouldn't end up in court. An electrician certainly doesn't guarantee that.

And knowing all the relevant codes is irrelevant. They must demonstrate that you did something wrong and THAT caused the fault.

No electrician knows ALL the code. No inspector knows ALL the code. Even when electricians and inspectors think they know a code they often disagree with each other, anyway. The same goes for lawyers, btw...

If you're not comfortable DIY'ing your install, then don't. But it's silly to tell others that DIY is a "bad idea".

I DIY'd my install. Got it permitted and inspected, too. Inspector said I did a great job, and he commented that many of the jobs he visits for "professional electricians" aren't as neat. I'm not surprised. It's MY home. I CARE. I wasn't worried about rushing the job so I could cash a check and move to the next gig.
 

·
Registered
R1S, Forrest Green/Black
Joined
·
299 Posts
If you have the skill I am sure you could do it yourself. I didn't want to take the risk so paid someone.

Its like when I did a new pool heater, I could do the water and electrical but was not comfortable touching the gas. Could I figure it out, sure, could I make a mistake and have BIG problems, definitely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I used to work as an electricians apprentice, I hired an electrician to install my ChargePoint charger. There are too many things you can get wrong, and the consequences can be serious when working with high currents and 240V.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I had a licensed electrician run a 60amp breaker and wire an outlet where I knew the wall charger would go prior to delivery. I then removed his outlet and installed the charger myself using his wiring. Worked well and wasn't too difficult.
 

·
Registered
2023 Rivian R1T (Ordered)
Joined
·
12 Posts
I DIY installed my Level 2 Tesla Wall Charger myself a couple of years ago. Saved at least $1,000 and it has worked flawlessly ever since.

If you decide to install an EVSE yourself, you need to remember a couple of things: First, make sure what you're installing is compliant with the electrical code. Most important, your charger should be de-rated to supply continuous charging at no more than 80 percent of the maximum load for your system. For example, if your system has a 50 amp breaker, than you need to set your EVSE to supply no more than 40 amps.

Second, make sure you use a quality torque wrench to properly torque the high-voltage connections in your EVSE. Improper torque has been the cause of numerous shorts and fires in EVSEs that weren't properly installed.

If you doubt your ability to install and wire an EVSE yourself, don't hesitate to hire an electrical contractor to do it.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top