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Hi all,

I suppose it’s early days, but..

Warranty for different components aside, is there any information at all as to what the life expectancy for the R1T and R1S is?

Wondering if anything has been put it there regarding this. Or even for individual components?

Cheers,
 

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Hi @Tobarus welcome to the forum! If you're looking for warranty information, Rivian has a battery warranty and a drivetrain warranty for 8 years or 175,000 miles. Are you interested in a R1S or R1T?

 

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Wouldn't be surprised if components (motors, etc..) weren't rated for 500K-1,000,000 miles.

The battery should be considered a "consumable" item which would need to be replaced during the life cycle of the vehicle.
 

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I, too, have this same question. I ask more from the aspect of the computer systems. We all have computers that begin to run slower and begin to fail after just a few years. Since this thing is a giant rolling computer with a bunch of little computers, at what point does the thing need microprocessor upgrades based on degradation and Moore's Law?
 

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I, too, have this same question. I ask more from the aspect of the computer systems. We all have computers that begin to run slower and begin to fail after just a few years. Since this thing is a giant rolling computer with a bunch of little computers, at what point does the thing need microprocessor upgrades based on degradation and Moore's Law?
It won't stop working just because the tech is aging.
 

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Hi all,

I suppose it’s early days, but..

Warranty for different components aside, is there any information at all as to what the life expectancy for the R1T and R1S is?

Wondering if anything has been put it there regarding this. Or even for individual components?

Cheers,
Obviously, since the Rivian is new , we don't have any data to confirm this but if it is anything like my Tesla Model S, I am expecting that it will be much less expensive to maintain and should run 200k+ miles without major expenses as compared to my Cadillac Escalade which I am spending 3k+ a year on general maintenance recommendations. I have had the Tesla for 6.5 yrs, during that time I had the computer display module replaced once under warranty - I believe it would have been a 3k expense if it wasn't under warranty. I also had a door handle and window mechanism repaired under warranty but that is really it. I have 88k miles on the vehicle and I have not needed the brakes replaced which is pretty typical of Teslas to go 100K + without needing a brake job. No oil or oil filter changes/radiator service, and all the other parts that go with a gas powered vehicle, so the annual cost to maintain the vehicle is very low and it runs just like it did when it was a brand new vehicle. I am hoping that my experience with the Rivian SUV will be similar. I am a fan of electric vehicles. I have a GEM car as well - many of these GEM cars out there are 20+ years old and running like new vehicles and retaining their value.
 

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Hi all,

I suppose it’s early days, but..

Warranty for different components aside, is there any information at all as to what the life expectancy for the R1T and R1S is?

Wondering if anything has been put it there regarding this. Or even for individual components?

Cheers,
Never mind that, there is absolutely no dealers. Now when something goes wrong, do you mail it back in a envelope 😂
 

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I’m willing to wager that for the most basic and likely of regular services like tire rotation, brakes, blinker fluid, etc, it would be hard for a reputable shops to void the warranty. Further, I expect to see more shops becoming EV-competent in short order as SAE has had hybrid and electric vehicle related courses for technicians.

Continue to fight the good fight on Right-To-Repair initiatives where you live and we’ll all be in great shape!
 

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How the hell do you void a warranty by rotating tires and adding fluid? That isn't even a thing.
Rotating tires really should never cause a warranty issue.

However, I've seen shops cause major problems with fluid changes. Using the wrong fluid, or not following the procedure correctly can wreak havoc. Modern vehicles can often have oddly specific requirements for which fluid is necessary and how to properly check the level. Many transmissions, for example, require you to warm them up to a specific temperature (as confirmed via scan tool) and shift through gears and then check the fluid within a certain time window. If you don't follow that procedure you'll under/over fill them.

My motorcycle has a baffling procedure for checking engine oil fill. You have to start the engine and warm it for several minutes, then shut it off, wait at least 2 but not more than 3 minutes and check the level. This is not only annoying, but it makes me wonder: How do we know it's safe to start/run the engine if we don't already know the fluid level is correct? What was wrong with the "old" sight glasses? I used to be able to bend over and immediately know if the oil level was correct. I'd check it every time before I rode. Now, I can't. /Rant

I cringe when I see people at the "quick lube" places; asking for mistakes, in my opinion.
 

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Having had a wheel and car get significantly damaged when lugs were not torqued to spec by technicians before driving, it is easily possible for a shop to violate the warranty (in part) simply rotating tires and performing other simple maintenance, however unlikely.

I’ve also found oil pan plugs not torqued to spec and other little items over the years always use a reputable shop and spot check when you can!
 

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What do you think about rivian saying hey ford can we work out a deal of some sort to handle the repairs if needed ? Since they are a partner.
 

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What do you think about rivian saying hey ford can we work out a deal of some sort to handle the repairs if needed ? Since they are a partner.
Ford doesn’t have the power to do that. Ford doesn’t own ANY repair facilities…. All repairs are handled by franchise dealers. Rivian could theoretically try to negotiate with dealers for access to service bays, but they’d have to negotiate with each one individually — or at least with dealer groups. It’s a lot of work; and even if Rivian did it, they wouldn’t be able to control the full experience, which is something they have repeatedly stated is a top priority for them.
 

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Rotating tires really should never cause a warranty issue.

However, I've seen shops cause major problems with fluid changes. Using the wrong fluid, or not following the procedure correctly can wreak havoc. Modern vehicles can often have oddly specific requirements for which fluid is necessary and how to properly check the level.
Every vehicle on the road has specific requirements for which fluids meet required specs and any competent shop will check to ensure the fluid meets spec before draining/filling. They have books with every make/model/year listing the proper fluids.

That said, shops are run by humans and humans take shortcuts. When a dealership makes a mistake, they are liable. When a third-party oil change shop makes the mistake, they are liable. When an owner makes the mistake, they are liable. The warranty isn't completely voided, it's just that the manufacture isn't liable for other's mistakes. This is not scary as long as you are dealing with reputable shops. I had a Ford dealer fill my 1 year old F-150 with a 4.6L V8 with one quart too much oil because they didn't look up the proper fill amount. They filled it as if it were a 5.4L V8. Yes, this can cause damage to seals, oxygen sensors, and greatly reduce MPG. But they took care of it. Ford had nothing to do with it as Ford Dealerships are independent shops.

But it's not odd that different vehicles require different fluids. It would be odd to assume they should all be the same. That's why there is such a thing as specifications for each vehicle. So it's not scary to have an independent shop work on your Rivian as long as they are qualified and can read instructions.

I thought Rivian is planning a mobile service network like Tesla has. This will be the best solution for those who don't live near a Rivian Service Center. The world is developing new, more efficient, more cost effective ways to achieve the same thing.
 

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Every vehicle on the road has specific requirements for which fluids meet required specs and any competent shop will check to ensure the fluid meets spec before draining/filling. They have books with every make/model/year listing the proper fluids.

That said, shops are run by humans and humans take shortcuts. When a dealership makes a mistake, they are liable. When a third-party oil change shop makes the mistake, they are liable. When an owner makes the mistake, they are liable. The warranty isn't completely voided, it's just that the manufacture isn't liable for other's mistakes. This is not scary as long as you are dealing with reputable shops. I had a Ford dealer fill my 1 year old F-150 with a 4.6L V8 with one quart too much oil because they didn't look up the proper fill amount. They filled it as if it were a 5.4L V8. Yes, this can cause damage to seals, oxygen sensors, and greatly reduce MPG. But they took care of it. Ford had nothing to do with it as Ford Dealerships are independent shops.

But it's not odd that different vehicles require different fluids. It would be odd to assume they should all be the same. That's why there is such a thing as specifications for each vehicle. So it's not scary to have an independent shop work on your Rivian as long as they are qualified and can read instructions.

I thought Rivian is planning a mobile service network like Tesla has. This will be the best solution for those who don't live near a Rivian Service Center. The world is developing new, more efficient, more cost effective ways to achieve the same thing.
TL;DR: "You won't have a problem unless the shop makes a mistake".

Um, duh?
 
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