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I can change to an R1S and keep pre-March 1 price! Now i have to think about this…
“…
Hi __,

Thanks to everybody who reached out with questions about preorder pricing. We know a lot's happened over the last couple of weeks, so we thought a quick recap might be helpful.

Our developers are working hard to restore your pricing in our systems. We appreciate your patience as we get this set up.

Here’s what you can expect once everything is updated:​
  • You will be able to reconfigure your preordered vehicle and maintain pre-March 1 pricing.
  • You can even swap between R1T and R1S and maintain pre-March 1 pricing.
  • Rivian accessories will be available at pre-March 1 pricing.
  • If you’d like to configure a post-March 1 option like Dual-Motor AWD, Standard battery pack or new accessory offerings, new pricing will apply (and we’ll be back in touch on how to select those options).

As a reminder, terms and details can be found in the Preorder Agreement. We’ll email you as soon as the configurator and your Rivian Account Page are updated. If you want more details in the meantime, reach out to us directly with any questions.

I hope you found this update helpful.

Until next time...

Tony Caravano
Head of Rivian Customer Engagement
…”​
 

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Letter was perfect. It also gives us (pre-March 1) a chanced to play with other options like the two motor and bigger battery without losing our base price. I'd trade the four motors and its off road capability for a bigger battery and two motors.
"If you’d like to configure a post-March 1 option like Dual-Motor AWD, Standard battery pack or new accessory offerings, new pricing will apply"

Seems to me that you will not see a benefit from ditching the four-motor, because if you choose Dual you're subject to new pricing.
 

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new pricing will apply
Have to wonder if it is in Rivian's interests to trade a four motor, mid range (314) battery model for a two motor, 350 battery range model. I reconfigured when the new price increase came out to the two motor and 260 mile range which came to $69k vs. $67k. I think my configuration at the new prices is around $80k so might be a trade worth making for Rivian.
 

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Letter was perfect. It also gives us (pre-March 1) a chanced to play with other options like the two motor and bigger battery without losing our base price. I'd trade the four motors and its off road capability for a bigger battery and two motors.
I would also happily trade a quad for a dual motor for an R1S with greater range, but it will not make sense unless a) the cost saving for the dual-motor is substantial and b) the cost increase for the larger battery pack is modest.

While I would have thought that the dual motor setup with the 135 Kwh LR battery pack would provide a substantial increase in range, on the R1T anyway, it does not (the range increase is a mere 6 miles; to 320 from 314) It remains to be seen what the capacity of the "Longer Range" battery pack that is under development for the R1S, it will not have the same 180 Kwh capacity as the R1T Max. The cost is another question mark. The Max pack option for the R1T is now $16,000, fully 60% more than before. I would expect then that Rivian will charge between $10,000 and $16,000 extra for the "Longer Range" battery pack if one is ever developed for the R1S.

I don't think the letter of the email supports that scenario? The two options are independent. If you pick a 2-motor you're subject to new pricing ... that's what it says in the email
I agree. The letter states:
"If you’d like to configure a post-March 1 option like Dual-Motor AWD, Standard battery pack or new accessory offerings, new pricing will apply (and we’ll be back in touch on how to select those options)."
 

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I could see the potential for more re-gen with 4 motors and more liner power distribution with 4 motors (as opposed to 2 motors) which won't equate to a big range differential overall compared to the 2 motor option, but I'm not a physicist.
 

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I could see the potential for more re-gen with 4 motors and more liner power distribution with 4 motors (as opposed to 2 motors) which won't equate to a big range differential overall compared to the 2 motor option, but I'm not a physicist.
I think your saying that Regen doesn’t add any measurable range. I agree because it doesn’t For normal driving. The only time I have ever seen any addition to range is coming down a big mountain. Then it does, but not for normal driving.
 

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I think your saying that Regen doesn’t add any measurable range. I agree because it doesn’t For normal driving. The only time I have ever seen any addition to range is coming down a big mountain. Then it does, but not for normal driving.
Not true. The reason hybrids are efficient around town is because they capture the energy you would otherwise lose to friction braking. And yes, regen makes an enormous difference if you're in hilly terrain.

In normal driving I get back 15-20% of battery capacity; less on a flat freeway.

Two motors vs four motors makes no difference in theory and in practice two motors is probably slightly more efficient.
 

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Not true. The reason hybrids are efficient around town is because they capture the energy you would otherwise lose to friction braking. And yes, regen makes an enormous difference if you're in hilly terrain.

In normal driving I get back 15-20% of battery capacity; less on a flat freeway.

Two motors vs four motors makes no difference in theory and in practice two motors is probably slightly more efficient.
Not true. The reason hybrids are efficient around town is because they capture the energy you would otherwise lose to friction braking. And yes, regen makes an enormous difference if you're in hilly terrain.

In normal driving I get back 15-20% of battery capacity; less on a flat freeway.

Two motors vs four motors makes no difference in theory and in practice two motors is probably slightly more efficient.
Not talking about hybrds.


EV do not pick up range due to regen unless going downhill.

Driving around town, regen helps slow the car down and saves on the brake pads. That's it. There is zero measurable gain on battery range. Don't kid yourself.
 

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EV do not pick up range due to regen unless going downhill.
Braking actually contributes the most regen in EV's, PHEV's and Hybrids.

As for whether four motors contribute more regen than two, it's the same amount of energy to be recaptured and typically, larger motors are more efficient than smaller motors.

In practice, I wouldn't expect much measurable difference in regen contribution four vs. two motors.
 

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To be clear, I wasn't talking about adding battery range. I was talking about the "potential" for 4 motors to be more effective at preserving range and being possibly more efficient (than 2 motors). All hypothetical, and depends on the motors used, how they are programmed, how much slowing force you can apply to each motor, etc. I would also imagine with 4 motors you will see less wear and tear over time. Interestingly, many former Tesla owners are stating that the 1-pedal driving in the Rivian takes some getting used to, because it is so good. So I would hold the Tesla comparisons until you drive a Rivian. One owner said he literally drove to his office and never touched the brakes.
 

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Electric motors are incredibly well-understood and capable engineering and manufacturing will provide pretty much optimal performance. There's also basically no wear and tear.

Btw, I can do the same in my I-Pace ... I hardly ever touch the brakes.

My understanding is that Tesla uses a 'dumb' (though still effective) system where regeneration is only used when the driver lifts the foot off the accelerator, and the brake pedal only engages the friction brakes. In the I-Pace, lifting the foot off the accelerator provides very strong regenerative braking (0.2 g at maximum setting), and you get another 0.2 g when you press the brake pedal; only after that do the friction brakes engage. (That's called a blended system)

I would be interested to know if the Rivian also has a blended system or if it's like Tesla's.
 
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