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Hello. Potential buyer here from north midwest.

I haven’t seen any stats on how their testing went in the cold. Does anybody know where to find it?

All I can find is marketing stuff like the video saying they sent a team to Northern MN to test it in the cold to make it seem they will do well in harsh winter. They also say they have their unique way of heating the battery. But Ive seen no data with regards to range or anything.

I will have about 150 mile round trip once a week. I’m going to get an AWD vehicle to handle the winter. I’d prefer electric for numerous reasons and Rivian seems like best option from what I can tell. But if range decreases 50% in the 0 degree F weather then I’d probably need gas.

Has anybody seen anything?
Thank you
 

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Welcome to the forum @Coldev.

It's understood that EVs in general do suffer in the cold. I suggest reading through this Consumer Reports article for more details. There's a good chance our Rivians will as well, but by how much is unclear at this point.
 

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If you ask Tesla owners, they'll tell you that they lose a good amount of mileage when it is very cold out...in the summer, the batteries perform admirably.

For example, my Mach-E is rated at 270 miles. However, at 85% charge, it's at 265 miles. I've charged it to 100% and seen it as high as 325 miles. It's not recommended to do this so I just set it at 85% and leave it...if we were to go on a long trip, I'd charge to 100%.

My Tesla owner friends tell me they lose about 10-15% battery range in winter. I live in MD so winters are quite cold...not as bad as Iowa/Idaho/Illinois, etc....but our winters are quite cold and humid.

EV technology is close enough between makers so there will be a drop-off in the winter but if you have a 300 or 400 mile range battery, it probably won't be too bad.
 

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If you ask Tesla owners, they'll tell you that they lose a good amount of mileage when it is very cold out...in the summer, the batteries perform admirably.

For example, my Mach-E is rated at 270 miles. However, at 85% charge, it's at 265 miles. I've charged it to 100% and seen it as high as 325 miles. It's not recommended to do this so I just set it at 85% and leave it...if we were to go on a long trip, I'd charge to 100%.

My Tesla owner friends tell me they lose about 10-15% battery range in winter. I live in MD so winters are quite cold...not as bad as Iowa/Idaho/Illinois, etc....but our winters are quite cold and humid.

EV technology is close enough between makers so there will be a drop-off in the winter but if you have a 300 or 400 mile range battery, it probably won't be too bad.
10-15% isn't that bad and likely won't be an issue for most owners. It will be interesting to see what the range drop is like when off-roading or just pushing it in general.
 

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You will definitely take a hit in the Winter, the colder, the worse it will be. It comes from two areas (and keep in mind, EVs are making advancements on this all with different/better BMS, heating/cooling systems, and improved HVAC):
  1. Cold batteries: Cold batteries are unhappy batteries, so the car has to warm them up when you start driving, that will use a fair bit of juice to get them to optimal operating temp. This will also (generally) impact your regen braking, as a cold battery won't take in as much regen charge when compared to a warmed up battery. So, it's kind of a double hit (takes juice to warm up, and you don't regain as much when braking). The hit here will vary based on how cold the batteries are and how cold it is outside.
  2. HVAC: My Tesla X will suck down a good 100 more watts per mile when it's 20-30F out and I have the cabin set to 64~67. Heat pumps and such will definitely help on this front (mine is a 2017, so mine uses good ole resisters for heat generation, not exactly the most efficient way to do it, but it works).
Some things you can do to help avoid some of the drain:
  1. Garage your rig. My garage isn't heated, but it is a hell of a lot warmer in there than outside.
  2. If your EV has the capability, leverage pre-conditioning/scheduled departure. For my Tesla, it knows my work calendar (kinda creepy, but I gave it access), so it knows when I will be leaving in the AM for my drive to work, or to drop my kiddo off at school. As a result, it starts warming up the batteries in advance of leaving to make sure they are warmed up and at optimal temp by the time I will be leaving my house and I come out and unplug the car to head out.
  3. Using your heated seat and heated steering wheel in place of HVAC (if it's just a bit chilly and not "OMG my boogers just froze in my nose when I stepped outside" cold).
I'm hesitant to give firm numbers on impact to range as that will vary wildly based on how you drive, where you live, temps, and what you have your HVAC set to. For example, my Tesla X should be using somewhere around 305~335 watts per mile (giving me a range of around 305ish miles), but, I live on a hill (decently steep hill at that), so my actual use is 387 watts per mile (260ish miles of range). I also have winter rims and tires that are smaller than my summer rims, so I technically get better efficiency in winter than I do in the summer (which will mess with my watts per mile calculation and such).
 

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You will definitely take a hit in the Winter, the colder, the worse it will be. It comes from two areas (and keep in mind, EVs are making advancements on this all with different/better BMS, heating/cooling systems, and improved HVAC):
  1. Cold batteries: Cold batteries are unhappy batteries, so the car has to warm them up when you start driving, that will use a fair bit of juice to get them to optimal operating temp. This will also (generally) impact your regen braking, as a cold battery won't take in as much regen charge when compared to a warmed up battery. So, it's kind of a double hit (takes juice to warm up, and you don't regain as much when braking). The hit here will vary based on how cold the batteries are and how cold it is outside.
  2. HVAC: My Tesla X will suck down a good 100 more watts per mile when it's 20-30F out and I have the cabin set to 64~67. Heat pumps and such will definitely help on this front (mine is a 2017, so mine uses good ole resisters for heat generation, not exactly the most efficient way to do it, but it works).
Some things you can do to help avoid some of the drain:
  1. Garage your rig. My garage isn't heated, but it is a hell of a lot warmer in there than outside.
  2. If your EV has the capability, leverage pre-conditioning/scheduled departure. For my Tesla, it knows my work calendar (kinda creepy, but I gave it access), so it knows when I will be leaving in the AM for my drive to work, or to drop my kiddo off at school. As a result, it starts warming up the batteries in advance of leaving to make sure they are warmed up and at optimal temp by the time I will be leaving my house and I come out and unplug the car to head out.
  3. Using your heated seat and heated steering wheel in place of HVAC (if it's just a bit chilly and not "OMG my boogers just froze in my nose when I stepped outside" cold).
I'm hesitant to give firm numbers on impact to range as that will vary wildly based on how you drive, where you live, temps, and what you have your HVAC set to. For example, my Tesla X should be using somewhere around 305~335 watts per mile (giving me a range of around 305ish miles), but, I live on a hill (decently steep hill at that), so my actual use is 387 watts per mile (260ish miles of range). I also have winter rims and tires that are smaller than my summer rims, so I technically get better efficiency in winter than I do in the summer (which will mess with my watts per mile calculation and such).
A third area you’ll take a hit is due to traction loss and or additional resistance on wet, snowy, icy or salt covered roads.
 

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Hello. Potential buyer here from north midwest.

I haven’t seen any stats on how their testing went in the cold. Does anybody know where to find it?

All I can find is marketing stuff like the video saying they sent a team to Northern MN to test it in the cold to make it seem they will do well in harsh winter. They also say they have their unique way of heating the battery. But Ive seen no data with regards to range or anything.

I will have about 150 mile round trip once a week. I’m going to get an AWD vehicle to handle the winter. I’d prefer electric for numerous reasons and Rivian seems like best option from what I can tell. But if range decreases 50% in the 0 degree F weather then I’d probably need gas.

Has anybody seen anything?
Thank you
Welcome to the forum @Coldev.

It's understood that EVs in general do suffer in the cold. I suggest reading through this Consumer Reports article for more details. There's a good chance our Rivians will as well, but by how much is unclear at this point.
Here's a couple more articles you might want to take a look at @Coldev. One of the key things is going to be prepping your truck before you take it for a drive.


MAXIMIZE YOUR CAR’S COLD-WEATHER RANGE
Extending an electric car’s operating range to achieve maximum miles on a charge can become an obsession with some electric car owners, and it becomes critical during the coldest months of the year. Proper planning is the key to tempering one’s range anxiety under extreme climactic conditions.

It’s best to keep an electric vehicle garaged when not in use to help shield it from the elements. If your garage at home and/or parking space at work is heated, so much the better. Keep the vehicle plugged in at all times to ensure the battery will maintain a full charge. If your vehicle has a pre-conditioning feature, engage it (usually via a smartphone app) before hitting the road. This will heat both the interior and the battery pack while the vehicle is plugged into the charger, which will in turn help preserve battery capacity. Some models will warm the battery automatically in cold weather. If you’re away from home, park the car in the sun to keep it a bit warmer.

Limit the use of the heater while driving. Set the temperature as low as you can comfortably stand, and instead rely on your car’s heated seats and heated steering wheel (if so equipped), which consume less electricity. Wear warm clothes and a heavy coat so you can minimize engaging the climate control. In the aforementioned AAA study, the electric vehicles tested only lost an average of about 12 percent of range in the cold while running with their heaters switched off, compared to 41 percent with the climate control in use.

If your car has a selectable “Eco” mode that will adjust performance parameters to preserve battery range, be sure to engage it. If your car allows you to tune in more or less regenerative braking, set it to full force to send more power pack to the battery when coming to a stop. And try to limit your speed while driving in cold weather. Not only does operating the vehicle at greater velocities use more energy than driving around town, a vehicle’s aerodynamic drag increases at higher speeds and requires added power to overcome.

Also, make note of where public charging stations are near where you live, shop and work in case you’re running unexpectedly low. Look for DC Fast Charging units that can bring an electric car’s battery back up to 80 percent of its capacity in 30-45 minutes, depending on the vehicle and the ambient temperature.



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You will definitely take a hit in the Winter, the colder, the worse it will be. It comes from two areas (and keep in mind, EVs are making advancements on this all with different/better BMS, heating/cooling systems, and improved HVAC):
  1. Cold batteries: Cold batteries are unhappy batteries, so the car has to warm them up when you start driving, that will use a fair bit of juice to get them to optimal operating temp. This will also (generally) impact your regen braking, as a cold battery won't take in as much regen charge when compared to a warmed up battery. So, it's kind of a double hit (takes juice to warm up, and you don't regain as much when braking). The hit here will vary based on how cold the batteries are and how cold it is outside.
  2. HVAC: My Tesla X will suck down a good 100 more watts per mile when it's 20-30F out and I have the cabin set to 64~67. Heat pumps and such will definitely help on this front (mine is a 2017, so mine uses good ole resisters for heat generation, not exactly the most efficient way to do it, but it works).
Some things you can do to help avoid some of the drain:
  1. Garage your rig. My garage isn't heated, but it is a hell of a lot warmer in there than outside.
  2. If your EV has the capability, leverage pre-conditioning/scheduled departure. For my Tesla, it knows my work calendar (kinda creepy, but I gave it access), so it knows when I will be leaving in the AM for my drive to work, or to drop my kiddo off at school. As a result, it starts warming up the batteries in advance of leaving to make sure they are warmed up and at optimal temp by the time I will be leaving my house and I come out and unplug the car to head out.
  3. Using your heated seat and heated steering wheel in place of HVAC (if it's just a bit chilly and not "OMG my boogers just froze in my nose when I stepped outside" cold).
I'm hesitant to give firm numbers on impact to range as that will vary wildly based on how you drive, where you live, temps, and what you have your HVAC set to. For example, my Tesla X should be using somewhere around 305~335 watts per mile (giving me a range of around 305ish miles), but, I live on a hill (decently steep hill at that), so my actual use is 387 watts per mile (260ish miles of range). I also have winter rims and tires that are smaller than my summer rims, so I technically get better efficiency in winter than I do in the summer (which will mess with my watts per mile calculation and such).
no question keep it in a garage....even if not heated...it's still far better than outside where it can get brutally cold
 
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