Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner

Are going to be buying the Rivian home charger?

  • Yes, I'll stick with Rivian

    Votes: 69 75.8%
  • No, I'm going with another home charger

    Votes: 22 24.2%
41 - 56 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I
As long as your panel has the capacity, I’d go with the 60 amp breaker and hard wire the EVSE. Charging speed shouldn’t be an issue on L2 charger. That mostly applies to L3 DCFC charging.
I generally agree — go with the hardwired EVSE. Just check to make sure that each link in the chain (i.e., the panel, breaker, and wire) are all compliant for the constant load. If you have to run new wire or install a subpanel, consider future prodding with the biggest gauge wire you can. As you might have noticed, new vehicles like the F150 Lighting are already advertising 80A EVSEs. In addition, should Rivian and/or future technologies allow for V2H/G, you will also want the more capable wire (lower gauge number).😉
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
As long as your panel has the capacity, I’d go with the 60 amp breaker and hard wire the EVSE. Charging speed shouldn’t be an issue on L2 charger. That mostly applies to L3 DCFC charging.
Thanks! What about the wear and tear on the EVSE, the heat on the cable, electrical panel, or other safety concerns? Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Thanks! What about the wear and tear on the EVSE, the heat on the cable, electrical panel, or other safety concerns? Any thoughts?
A major advantage to hardwiring the EVSE is limited wear and tear of it and the plug. Regarding the cable and unit heat, it is rated for what it is so no issues there. Focus on the panel, wiring, and breaker size for your intended EVSE size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The supplied charging cable can plug into 110V for up to 11 charged miles or a 240V that can get you up to 16 charged miles.
Good points....also...I spoke with two electricians...one who installed my NEMA 14-50. The Juicebox and I am sure others do not need any electrical protection outside of the unit, itself...hence, no reason for a GFCIs or the like...

My wife's Mach-E is 48A...it charges at about 22-25mph....I'd have to sit there and check it or do averages, but it's certainly much more than 16 per hour on the NEMA circuit I've seen others mention. The plug-in 110 should only give about 5-8, btw...the estimation at 11 seems very high for only 110.
It's easier to follow charging by comparing kWh rates (which is why charging varies my car).

Many of the new BEVs can charge up to 48A @ 240V which is 11.5 kW (48×240) or 11.5 kWh for each hour charging. Assuming average consumption for the Rivian of 450 Wh/mile (0.45 kWh), that translates to 25.6 miles for every hour charging (11.5/.45) [there is some loss in charging of about 5-10% which does reduce the numbers a little and also depending on how far the travel is for the power, there is some reduction off of 240V (at my house, I average 233V to my car). A more efficient car will charge faster per hour even though the power is the same - a car with average consumption of 250 Wh/mile will charge at 46 miles/hour (11.5/.25).

The Rivian supplied Portable Charger looks to be limited to 30A or 32A (which is the same that Tesla provides). At 30A, it would provide 7.2 kW charging good for 16 miles/hr. Plugging the portable charger on a standard 120V outlet (15A) would limit charging to 12A or 1.44 kW or 3 miles/hour. If the Portable Charger also includes a NEMA 5-20 plug, it can charge up to 15A or 4 miles/hour. (there are some 120V outlets higher than 20A but very rare and fairly useless).

The most common 240V outlets are NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 6-50 - both are on 50A circuits allowing 40A charging (9.6 kW or 21 miles/hour). [There is a NEMA 14-60 standard that could charge at 48A but have not seen any plug-in units using that standard.]

The Rivian Wall Charger is hard wired and can charge at the maximum 48A.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Now that we know Rivian's home wall charger is going to cost $500, how many people are going to order one instead of going with a third party?

Answer the poll below and let's see what the numbers are. If you aren't ordering a Rivian home charger reply with which one you're ordering or already have installed at your home.

View attachment 2157
Could you add in a poll option of "yes - only if bi-directional capable"? I currently have a Chargepoint L2 charger so I wouldn't get the Rivian one unless it was bi-directional (like a lot of others have posted on here)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
It's easier to follow charging by comparing kWh rates (which is why charging varies my car).

Many of the new BEVs can charge up to 48A @ 240V which is 11.5 kW (48×240) or 11.5 kWh for each hour charging. Assuming average consumption for the Rivian of 450 Wh/mile (0.45 kWh), that translates to 25.6 miles for every hour charging (11.5/.45) [there is some loss in charging of about 5-10% which does reduce the numbers a little and also depending on how far the travel is for the power, there is some reduction off of 240V (at my house, I average 233V to my car). A more efficient car will charge faster per hour even though the power is the same - a car with average consumption of 250 Wh/mile will charge at 46 miles/hour (11.5/.25).

The Rivian supplied Portable Charger looks to be limited to 30A or 32A (which is the same that Tesla provides). At 30A, it would provide 7.2 kW charging good for 16 miles/hr. Plugging the portable charger on a standard 120V outlet (15A) would limit charging to 12A or 1.44 kW or 3 miles/hour. If the Portable Charger also includes a NEMA 5-20 plug, it can charge up to 15A or 4 miles/hour. (there are some 120V outlets higher than 20A but very rare and fairly useless).

The most common 240V outlets are NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 6-50 - both are on 50A circuits allowing 40A charging (9.6 kW or 21 miles/hour). [There is a NEMA 14-60 standard that could charge at 48A but have not seen any plug-in units using that standard.]

The Rivian Wall Charger is hard wired and can charge at the maximum 48A.
great points. Being I already have an EV, I had to go with something. I am very happy with the juicebox and I'm sure it'll fit the bill for the Rivian. I really also recommend the TeslaTap mini 60...a must-have for those of us who want to be able to use the tesla chargers (not the supercharger, though)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I bought another charger already but will stick that one in the rental property in Pensacola and keep the Rivian hardwired 60amp at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I have a Tesla charger hardwired into a 60A circuit now, and will be replacing that (as i plan to replace my Tesla X with the R1T) with a hardwired ChargePoint Home Flex unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I have a Tesla charger hardwired into a 60A circuit now, and will be replacing that (as i plan to replace my Tesla X with the R1T) with a hardwired ChargePoint Home Flex unit.
Why the ChargePoint Home Flex unit instead of the Rivian one? Are there better features?

EDIT: Looks like ChargePoint only goes up to 50A whereas Rivian goes up to 60A.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Why the ChargePoint Home Flex unit instead of the Rivian one? Are there better features?

EDIT: Looks like ChargePoint only goes up to 50A whereas Rivian goes up to 60A.
A couple reasons:
  1. We are most likely selling our house in a year or two, so putting a non-brand specific charger is a key point for me (and it's a good selling point for the buyer).
  2. It has a good app with lots of bells and whistles and is tied into a third party service that I'll most likely be using (ChargePoint is kinda everywhere up here), so it makes for an ease of use/tracking usage thing.
  3. Wife is buying a Kia EV6 (no idea if the Rivian charger will play nice with a Kia... see point 1).
  4. It supports a dynamic range of inputs (Amps).

Amperage SettingEstimated Range Per HourMaximum Output PowerCircuit Breaker RatingPlug-in InstallationHardwired Installation
16A12 mi / 19 km3.8 kW20ANoYes
24A18 mi / 29 km5.8 kW30ANoYes
32A25 mi / 40 km7.7 kW40AYesYes
40A30 mi / 48 km9.6 kW50AYesYes
48A36 mi / 58 km11.5 kW60ANoYes
50A37 mi / 60 km12 kW70A/80A NoYes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
A couple reasons:
  1. We are most likely selling our house in a year or two, so putting a non-brand specific charger is a key point for me (and it's a good selling point for the buyer).
  2. It has a good app with lots of bells and whistles and is tied into a third party service that I'll most likely be using (ChargePoint is kinda everywhere up here), so it makes for an ease of use/tracking usage thing.
  3. Wife is buying a Kia EV6 (no idea if the Rivian charger will play nice with a Kia... see point 1).
  4. It supports a dynamic range of inputs (Amps).
1. Good point, but this will likely result in another app instead of a single app experience for your Rivian.
2. This probably offsets #1 somewhat
3. Rivian uses a standard J1772 plug, same as ChargePoint. This is also used by Kia.
4. Rivian says their charger is "also capable of charging other EVs"

Cons of the ChargePoint:
1. Only 3-year warranty compared to Rivian's 5
2. $700 vs. $500
3. Max 50A instead of 60A (30mi/hr instead of 36mi/hr as per your table)
4. Not waterproof (maybe not important for indoors, but I assume Rivian's will keep out dust and bugs better)
5. If something bad happens you could be stuck in a finger pointing game between ChargePoint and Rivian

I'm trying to make an informed decision, but so far leaning toward Rivian unless there's a better solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
1. Good point, but this will likely result in another app instead of a single app experience for your Rivian.
2. This probably offsets #1 somewhat
3. Rivian uses a standard J1772 plug, same as ChargePoint. This is also used by Kia.
4. Rivian says their charger is "also capable of charging other EVs"

Cons of the ChargePoint:
1. Only 3-year warranty compared to Rivian's 5
2. $700 vs. $500
3. Max 50A instead of 60A (30mi/hr instead of 36mi/hr as per your table)
4. Not waterproof (maybe not important for indoors, but I assume Rivian's will keep out dust and bugs better)
5. If something bad happens you could be stuck in a finger pointing game between ChargePoint and Rivian

I'm trying to make an informed decision, but so far leaning toward Rivian unless there's a better solution.
Like I said, my reasoning maybe different from other folks. We are not planning to be in our current house more than 2 years, so the warranty doesn't factor for me.

The charging rate, also isn't significant enough for me to worry about (I drive maybe 15 miles a day right now... maybe 30 when we move back to working in offices a bit more).

And while I know that the Rivian app and plug should work seamlessly with any other J1772 plug, but for whomever is buying my house after, if they have an EV, chances are, they will have the ChargePoint app.

So, again, my reasons may well differ from yours.
 
41 - 56 of 56 Posts
Top