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2017 Prius, 2012 Tacoma, 2012 Vespa GTV300
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ugh....a little disappointing. I was hoping for a quicker charge from 20-80%

Hopefully by the time my R1S is available (first half of 2023), they've updated the tech/software to enable quicker charging....
If you aren't expecting your Rivian until 2023 then I wouldn't worry too much about this latest charging test. I imagine that both the robustness of the charging networks and vehicle will continue to improve.
 

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Red/Black R1T Adventure, max pack, off-road, 22 Sports.
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I'm wondering how much that difference (82 delivered vs 73 in the vehicle) can be explained - keeping the car running inside (heat, etc), effect of keeping the pack at an ideal temperature for charging, charging net losses, etc. 9 kWh over 40 minutes might be in line with heating but still seems a little high. I'll be curious to see how well the Max Pack charges. I certainly hope they can boost the charge rate higher without degradation of the pack itself. 180kWh will be a beast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I certainly hope they can boost the charge rate higher without degradation of the pack itself. 180kWh will be a beast.
So do I. I think the specs for the Silverado EV have it beat over any other BEV truck at this point. If they hold true, I'm not sure what GM is doing differently but whomever wins the battery density and cooling war wins the BEV truck race. Especially for those of us wishing to tow with our BEVs.
 

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GM can make all the claims they want until it's out and actually charging at that rate don't get your hopes up.

Also is it possible that station was limited ? Who knows, I've seen some 350kw chargers that only go to 35kw lol

1 data point isn't enough imo. But it was still fairly quick. My friend is happy with 50kw fast charging on his model3, of course a much smaller battery.
 

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So do I. I think the specs for the Silverado EV have it beat over any other BEV truck at this point. If they hold true, I'm not sure what GM is doing differently but whomever wins the battery density and cooling war wins the BEV truck race. Especially for those of us wishing to tow with our BEVs.
It's all about the voltage. GM's taking a charge at ~800 volts, R1T is currently ~450 volts. Interestingly I think the GM trucks are still 400-volt architecture on the inside, they just switch between a parallel and series connection somewhere in the battery pack to be able to take a charge at 800v. Sort of a "best of both worlds" approach, though I'll be curious to see if that switch is reliable over time or if a high number of people find that failing and needing repairs.
 

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It's all about the voltage. GM's taking a charge at ~800 volts, R1T is currently ~450 volts. Interestingly I think the GM trucks are still 400-volt architecture on the inside, they just switch between a parallel and series connection somewhere in the battery pack to be able to take a charge at 800v. Sort of a "best of both worlds" approach, though I'll be curious to see if that switch is reliable over time or if a high number of people find that failing and needing repairs.
Rivian has a patent for a switch like that actually. The question is whether they have the hardware installed on the trucks right now, but not necessarily activated in the software.
 

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I'm wondering how much that difference (82 delivered vs 73 in the vehicle) can be explained -

180kWh will be a beast.
I think the Rivian meter states that 73 KW is in the battery and available for use. The charger needs to sell more power to get that amount into the battery pack. So the 9 KW difference is in charging losses, or about 8%. If you where to charge on a really hot day,, with the cooling compressor running full blast to prevent battery over temperature, then you would see even greater difference between the 73 KW into the battery and perhaps 95 - 90 KW consumed by the truck to put that amount of power into the battery pack. With snow on the ground, the standard fan can keep the battery below 95F, without needing the compressor to run the A/C system to cool the battery water.
 
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