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According to Ram CEO Mike Koval Jr. the Ram 1500 EV will be offered with a range extender.


At the 2022 Chicago Auto Show, Ram formally introduced its Ram Revolution program to provide fans and real truck users access to the development of the electric Ram pickup truck.

Heading this strategy, along with Ram’s overall execution, is Mike Koval Jr. As the CEO of Ram Trucks, it’s up to him to get the electric truck (and upcoming Ram ProMaster electric). We sat down at the auto show with Mr. Koval to talk about the truck.

He tells us that the Ram 1500 electric will “push past” not only the current competition (and competition that will be out by then), but also customer expectations of what an electric truck should be.

While talking about that truck, he also mentioned that along with the fully-electric pickup truck, there will be a “class shattering” range extender version.

While he wouldn’t go into details — executives like to not talk about future product — this is the first that we’ve heard that the Ram would have a range extendible option.

What is a range extender? It’s an EV with an onboard gasoline- or diesel-powered motor to charge the battery. This gives you all the performance of a BEV, but without the range anxiety.

We also expect a range extender to help with the issue of reduced EV range when towing. An electric pickup truck unloaded will obviously will have more range than a fully loaded truck pulling a trailer.

Battery density and range will increase as the technology advances, of course, but a gasoline range extender (as long as it’s not a Hellcat motor) would virtually eliminate that issue.

The BEV Ram 1500 will be out sometime in 2024, and Mr. Koval didn’t give any specifics on the availability of the range-extended version, but we wouldn’t be surprised to see it around that same time.
 

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If it’s just for charging the batteries and not actually powering the drivetrain, I don’t see how this is any different than just throwing a gas generator in the back of the truck. I’ve got a tri-fuel portable 10kW generator that can output 32amps @240v with a NEMA 14-50 connector built in. For the rare times that I’d really need extended range, I’d rather throw that in the back vs. carting the weight around all the time for something I’d hardly ever need. But then again, the majority of their target market are going to be uneducated and misinformed about range and charging (and thus suffer from massive range anxiety), so from a marketing standpoint maybe it makes sense. Agree with @CommodoreAmiga that they are late to the party and looking for some way to make up ground.
 

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I had a BMW i3 with the REX. It was more than a gimmick and definitely helped with range anxiety, but couldn't put juice in as quick as I used it on the highway. Of course that car only had a range of 75 miles or less anyway. Not sure what size generator Ram will put in.

I did feel totally stupid sitting in line to get it emissions tested last time I renewed my registration though.
 

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A REX might be useful for some people in certain use cases, maybe for extended jobsite power or backcountry trips where you could bring extra fuel and are driving at slow speed on gravel roads. Personally, I doubt I would be interested in it but like all things, I'll reserve judgement until we have more information. Of course, I doubt the Ram will meet my needs better than an R1T in any case and I can't imagine that the Ram will be as fun to drive.
 

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If it’s just for charging the batteries and not actually powering the drivetrain, I don’t see how this is any different than just throwing a gas generator in the back of the truck. I’ve got a tri-fuel portable 10kW generator that can output 32amps @240v with a NEMA 14-50 connector built in. For the rare times that I’d really need extended range, I’d rather throw that in the back vs. carting the weight around all the time for something I’d hardly ever need. But then again, the majority of their target market are going to be uneducated and misinformed about range and charging (and thus suffer from massive range anxiety), so from a marketing standpoint maybe it makes sense. Agree with @CommodoreAmiga that they are late to the party and looking for some way to make up ground.
Can you share the brand/model of that generator? Seems like a great idea for long haul trips with no charging in sight. Thanks!
 

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If the truck itself has a EV only range in the 200 mile range and a small 4 cylinder engine to extend range by 200-300 miles, I think it would be a great concept. Reducing the battery size will offset the added weight of the engine. Current EV trucks have little appeal as tow vehicles due to test showing they end up with out 30-40% of their range while towing in cold weather. This also eliminates any range anxiety for long distance travel. The Volt was always a great concept that should have appealed to many, but was poorly marketed. May BEV's offer only a small EV only range of less than 30 miles, which has no appeal. It needs to be an EV first, with the small gas backup there only for rare use scenarios. 200 miles of EV range pretty much covers most driver's daily needs. But, would also allow towing long distance to be more practical. I think it could be a home run if they educate the public properly.
 

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May BEV's offer only a small EV only range of less than 30 miles, which has no appeal. It needs to be an EV first, with the small gas backup there only for rare use scenarios. 200 miles of EV range pretty much covers most driver's daily needs. But, would also allow towing long distance to be more practical. I think it could be a home run if they educate the public properly.
What mass-market BEV has a range of only 30 miles? Or are you confusing BEV with PHEV?
 

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View attachment 5084

According to Ram CEO Mike Koval Jr. the Ram 1500 EV will be offered with a range extender.


At the 2022 Chicago Auto Show, Ram formally introduced its Ram Revolution program to provide fans and real truck users access to the development of the electric Ram pickup truck.

Heading this strategy, along with Ram’s overall execution, is Mike Koval Jr. As the CEO of Ram Trucks, it’s up to him to get the electric truck (and upcoming Ram ProMaster electric). We sat down at the auto show with Mr. Koval to talk about the truck.

He tells us that the Ram 1500 electric will “push past” not only the current competition (and competition that will be out by then), but also customer expectations of what an electric truck should be.

While talking about that truck, he also mentioned that along with the fully-electric pickup truck, there will be a “class shattering” range extender version.

While he wouldn’t go into details — executives like to not talk about future product — this is the first that we’ve heard that the Ram would have a range extendible option.

What is a range extender? It’s an EV with an onboard gasoline- or diesel-powered motor to charge the battery. This gives you all the performance of a BEV, but without the range anxiety.

We also expect a range extender to help with the issue of reduced EV range when towing. An electric pickup truck unloaded will obviously will have more range than a fully loaded truck pulling a trailer.

Battery density and range will increase as the technology advances, of course, but a gasoline range extender (as long as it’s not a Hellcat motor) would virtually eliminate that issue.

The BEV Ram 1500 will be out sometime in 2024, and Mr. Koval didn’t give any specifics on the availability of the range-extended version, but we wouldn’t be surprised to see it around that same time.
Interesting Idea, however having driven a Fisker Karma for many years there are quite a few drawbacks of having a range extender. That is not to say this is a bad plan by RAM as there are some definite convenient benefits. Here are some of the drawbacks I've observed with my Fisker and probably carry over to the RAM
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1. Added weight: if you are going to use a range extender the efficiency of it is going to be as if you are driving a normal ICE truck on the nearly max payload so expect that level of fuel efficiency when using it.
2. Worse safety for other drivers & yourself: Having just got an R1T I'm concerned with what would happen if I hit a smaller compact car. I can only imagine how much damage it would cause if a large battery and ICE engine truck hit a regular size car, and without the electric frunk to use as a crumple zone you practically have a battering ram
3. Tire wear of an EV, reliability of ICE: Even though I have never had any problems with my Fisker engine has always worked relatively fine, I know plenty of range extender owners who do not share this view.
4. Less space (I'm also guessing less payload from the weight): This one is pretty self-explanatory, with no frunk you will lose one of the most practical features of an EV, added storage.
5. Questionable environmental sustainability: This one I am probably the least sure about because you could be buying this vehicle to avoid buying both an ICE and EV, but as a standalone car your vehicle probably has one of the highest carbon and resource footprints.
6. Super inefficient: I think it's pretty obvious that using a gas motor to spin a generator that creates electricity is not very efficient. I hope the RAM has some way to cut out the generator as the middle man, unlike my Fisker.
7. Engines are undersized/powered and thus prone to being overworked/overheated: I have a TOM device on my Fisker as well as a few other mods to help manage the heat, but if you are going to use the ICE drivers prepare for a smoke show, when the engine gives up.


I'm sure I'm missing some drawbacks. Let me know what I am missing or should add, or even if I'm wrong entirely xD. I'm always willing to listen and learn :) Wheel Tire Car Automotive parking light Sky
 

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@jbubby101 , don't take this the wrong way, but in another thread you're talking about lugging around a generator for your offroad excursions ... your list of issues with range extenders here can be directly applied to that heavy, expensive, and inefficient generator you want to plop into the bed of your R1T ... doesn't it?
 

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@jbubby101 , don't take this the wrong way, but in another thread you're talking about lugging around a generator for your offroad excursions ... your list of issues with range extenders here can be directly applied to that heavy, expensive, and inefficient generator you want to plop into the bed of your R1T ... doesn't it?
I 100% see your point here and there is truth in it. Which is why I was trying to find the smallest generator I could find bc I’m only going to use it twice over the 10 years I’m going to own the vehicle. I’m going to use the generator once for a test to see the fuel economy and once for an over landing trip where there are no chargers yet. Otherwise I will never use it again unlike people who will carry there own generator the entire span of ownership
Now if they had a function to
 

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I'm only going to use it twice over the 10 years I’m going to own the vehicle
And that's a really good point - you can load a generator into your bed when and if you expect to need it. In my case, that would be VERY rarely - I get along just fine on my ICE vehicle which has a range less than 300 miles, so I expect that I will do just fine with my R1T as well.
 

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Current EV trucks have little appeal as tow vehicles due to test showing they end up with out 30-40% of their range while towing in cold weather.
I don't know how many times this needs to be said, but THE SAME IS TRUE OF ICE VEHICLES! They ALSO end up with 30-40% of their range when towing. Look at the Out of Spec towing review of the Rivian vs. F-150 Powerboost Hybrid. The F-150 has an EPA rating of 24 mpg, but when towing it had a measured range of 7 mpg.

The only advantage the F-150 has is the huge gas tank, which makes this 7 mpg workable for some people.

I personally will be towing with my R1T (in about a month from now, fingers crossed), and FOR ME the R1T will be JUST AS GOOD as my current ICE tow vehicle that doesn't have a huge gas tank.
 

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I don't know how many times this needs to be said, but THE SAME IS TRUE OF ICE VEHICLES! They ALSO end up with 30-40% of their range when towing. Look at the Out of Spec towing review of the Rivian vs. F-150 Powerboost Hybrid. The F-150 has an EPA rating of 24 mpg, but when towing it had a measured range of 7 mpg.

The only advantage the F-150 has is the huge gas tank, which makes this 7 mpg workable for some people.

I personally will be towing with my R1T (in about a month from now, fingers crossed), and FOR ME the R1T will be JUST AS GOOD as my current ICE tow vehicle that doesn't have a huge gas tank.
The bigger advantage ICE has over BEV, here, is the refueling time. A 5 minute stop for petrol is a lot more palatable than a 90 minute stop to recharge a BEV.
 

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(EDIT)

Yeah, but I don't think that's a real problem. My stops for petrol are never 5 minutes. They're more like 3 minutes per person in line in front of me. And there are usually 2 or 3 people in front of me. Regardless, you still have to make those 30 minute stops in an ICE vehicle for food or bathroom breaks, or to walk the dog, so it's not as bad as you make it out. And it's certainly not an unreasonable amount of time. If you plan it right, you won't be making 90 minute stops, you will be making a bunch of shorter stops. With an ICE vehicle, you ALSO make stops that are not related to refueling, so those should be accounted for as well when you talk about ICE vehicles.

The conclusion that EV vehicles are not viable as towing vehicles is what I was addressing, and I just don't believe that's true.
 

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I don't know how many times this needs to be said, but THE SAME IS TRUE OF ICE VEHICLES! They ALSO end up with 30-40% of their range when towing. Look at the Out of Spec towing review of the Rivian vs. F-150 Powerboost Hybrid. The F-150 has an EPA rating of 24 mpg, but when towing it had a measured range of 7 mpg.

The only advantage the F-150 has is the huge gas tank, which makes this 7 mpg workable for some people.

I personally will be towing with my R1T (in about a month from now, fingers crossed), and FOR ME the R1T will be JUST AS GOOD as my current ICE tow vehicle that doesn't have a huge gas tank.
True, but you don't have wait 1 hour to "fill up" every 100 miles in a gas vehicle. 500 mile trip. 4 stops. 4 hours added, versus maybe 20 minutes in an ICE vehicle Not many are going to be willing to use an EV to tow more than a couple hundred miles
 

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And that's a really good point - you can load a generator into your bed when and if you expect to need it. In my case, that would be VERY rarely - I get along just fine on my ICE vehicle which has a range less than 300 miles, so I expect that I will do just fine with my R1T as well.
Problem is, you can't charge while you drive with a generator. So that's where the onboard generator is beneficial, especially for those that will use it. The weight of a 4 cylinder engine is less than the batteries necessary to add 150 miles in range, so 200 miles plus a generator is better than 350 miles with additional batteries. Most won't use the extra 150 miles in range much either, but still carry the weight all the time.
 

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I 100% see your point here and there is truth in it. Which is why I was trying to find the smallest generator I could find bc I’m only going to use it twice over the 10 years I’m going to own the vehicle. I’m going to use the generator once for a test to see the fuel economy and once for an over landing trip where there are no chargers yet. Otherwise I will never use it again unlike people who will carry there own generator the entire span of ownership
Now if they had a function to
@jbubby101 , don't take this the wrong way, but in another thread you're talking about lugging around a generator for your offroad excursions ... your list of issues with range extenders here can be directly applied to that heavy, expensive, and inefficient generator you want to plop into the bed of your R1T ... doesn't it?
I 100% see your point here and there is truth in it. Which is why I was trying to find the smallest generator I could find bc I’m only going to use it twice over the 10 years I’m going to own the vehicle. I’m going to use the generator once for a test to see the fuel economy and once for an over landing trip where there are no chargers yet. Otherwise I will never use it again unlike people who will carry there own generator the entire span of ownership. This is why I’m so interested in finding the right generator bc I will probably just donate it
Problem is, you can't charge while you drive with a generator. So that's where the onboard generator is beneficial, especially for those that will use it. The weight of a 4 cylinder engine is less than the batteries necessary to add 150 miles in range, so 200 miles plus a generator is better than 350 miles with additional batteries. Most won't use the extra 150 miles in range much either, but still carry the weight all the time.
I see your point, but batteries aren't the same as a 4 cylinder. One of the reasons that I haven't had to change the battery of my electric car is that I always keep it between 20-80% for longevity. While owners have to change and fix engine parts my Fisker has only ever needed a suspension tuneup and alignment. With an R1T having a 300-mile range means that you in actuality have 100-150 miles of range that doesn't degrade the battery life. Part of the reason why our phones die so fast is partly bc apple designs it, but mostly bc we run it from 100% - 0% 100%... In my other EV I've only experienced degradation of 3 miles in 10+ years. If you only have 200 miles you are going to only have approx. 80 non-degrading miles of range which just isn't enough for me.

My second issue with the four-cylinder is all the energy loss. At least in my Fisker, I had to install a TOM device for better engine regulation and efficiency. Now if they plan on making the truck front-wheel drive like Rivian has in conserve, I'm all for that, but if they make it spin a generator to make power, then they are using 10-year-old tech strategies :confused:.

DISCLAIMER: my background is not in engineering so my numbers may have some level of error. Also feel free to agree or disagree, I'm always happy to learn more :).

Edit: Also If they are claiming 200miles it's safe to assume that in the real world its going to about 10-15% less.
 

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My simple point is, for someone that wants an EV truck to use in all scenarios, unfortunately, one does not exist nor is on the horizon. Long distance travel and towing are notable sacrifices for many truck buyers. As such, as great as some of the EV trucks are, they're still only going to make up a fraction of the market share for trucks in general. So, how do you satisfy that? If 90% of truck buyers are going to buy ICE trucks anyway, wouldn't it be better to offer a 200 mile all EV Truck that will satisfy most daily driving needs and they'll never use gas, and include a small engine / generator to satisfy all those that would otherwise stay away from EV's all together than having them all buy ICE trucks? Seems like a heck of a better option. The 4 cylinder engine will serve many those that do travel long distances and/or tow regularly. Yet, will result in 90%+ of their driving being emission free.

A 200 mile EV truck with no back up, wouldn't sell. There are 300 mile offerings that will sell, but to only a select group. A 400 mile range might bring in another 3-4% of buyers. But, considering, 95% won't use more than 200 miles a day in 95% of their driving needs, carrying all that battery weight is less efficient and still won't convince enough of the market to switch to electric. For those that stay away specifically because they don't want to stop for an hour to charge or because they tow a lot, 500 miles in range probably still wouldn't be enough to get them to go EV only. Yet, if they could effectively give up nothing, have the same capabilities they do with a current ICE, yet spend 95% of the time on electric only, I just don't see how that's not a HUGE WIN. The key is having enough EV range rather than some nominal 30-50 miles in range. Again, the weight of a PHEV with 200 EV and a range extender is likely less than that of a 350 mile range all EV. Look at the Hummer at 9,000 lbs or even the small Rivian at 7,000 lbs. Ford will be over 7,000 lbs. 90 or so kWh battery, plus the range extender, probably under 7,000 lbs or right there, yet with no sacrifice to owners that would otherwise stick with ICE trucks. Big picture. Someday, when EV's can charge in 10 minutes for 300 mile in range, then you can drop the Range Extenders. Until then, most trucks sold will still be ICE vehicles. 200 EV + ICE capability "when needed", could satisfy 80% of the market. A whole lot better than the less than 5% market share EV's have today. Would be a great compromise until battery / charging tech improves enough, but that's still many years away.
 
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