Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Not sure if I can agree with not including the +$250k bracket. Also the sedan cap should be raised:

Now, this language isn't final and it's been changing somewhat frequently. That said, the potential effect of this change translates into a $12,500 discount for large, more expensive vehicles. On the flip side of this, the income levels necessary to be eligible for the credit have gone down. If one's individual income is above $250,000 or their household income exceeds $500,000, they no longer qualify for the incentive. This is down from $400,000 and $800,000, respectively.

The $55,000 cap for sedans has stayed where it is, effectively making smaller, more expensive cars less attractive from an incentives standpoint. Combine this relatively low price cap for sedans with the aforementioned provision reducing the credit by $4,500 for non-union-made EVs, plus a discount of $500 for having American-made batteries, and expensive, foreign-built sedans are getting hit the hardest here. It also doesn't help that all EVs made outside the U.S. after 2027 wouldn't be eligible for any credit whatsoever if the act passes in its current form.

Needless to say, internationally based automakers are not happy about this. Reuters indicates several foreign countries who export vehicles stateside have written to protest the act's text, including South Korea, Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and more. Non-unionized domestic automakers like Tesla and Rivian are upset, too, and a company like Lucid, which isn't unionized and makes no vehicles besides sedans above $55,000, would currently receive little if any of the credit despite being an American company building EVs in Arizona.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
Not sure if I can agree with not including the +$250k bracket. Also the sedan cap should be raised:

Now, this language isn't final and it's been changing somewhat frequently. That said, the potential effect of this change translates into a $12,500 discount for large, more expensive vehicles. On the flip side of this, the income levels necessary to be eligible for the credit have gone down. If one's individual income is above $250,000 or their household income exceeds $500,000, they no longer qualify for the incentive. This is down from $400,000 and $800,000, respectively.

The $55,000 cap for sedans has stayed where it is, effectively making smaller, more expensive cars less attractive from an incentives standpoint. Combine this relatively low price cap for sedans with the aforementioned provision reducing the credit by $4,500 for non-union-made EVs, plus a discount of $500 for having American-made batteries, and expensive, foreign-built sedans are getting hit the hardest here. It also doesn't help that all EVs made outside the U.S. after 2027 wouldn't be eligible for any credit whatsoever if the act passes in its current form.

Needless to say, internationally based automakers are not happy about this. Reuters indicates several foreign countries who export vehicles stateside have written to protest the act's text, including South Korea, Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and more. Non-unionized domestic automakers like Tesla and Rivian are upset, too, and a company like Lucid, which isn't unionized and makes no vehicles besides sedans above $55,000, would currently receive little if any of the credit despite being an American company building EVs in Arizona.


How many electric sedans currently qualify under this cap of $55,000?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
"SUBN" is short for Suburban on my Model Y New York State Title and NYS Registration docs. Just like "Pass" is short for Passenger vehicle, LTR = Light Trailer, etc...

The important part is... "SUBN" puts the Model Y in the SUV category for the Fed tax credit.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top