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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks to @Cale reaching out to Rivian, we now know that the bolt pattern Rivian uses is 5x5.5

 

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Any idea on offset and bore size ?
Not too keen on the tire/wheels options they have , wouldn't mind to shop around.
 

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I’m surprised to see only 5 lugs. This is a heavy vehicle. I would have expected at least six. Even a Tacoma has six.
1000 HP F-1 only have one lug nut, and even NASCAR, notorious for leaving a nut off to save time, is switching to a single nut, more expensive though it may be because of material requirements. The weight of the vehicle (magnified appropriately from the g-force experienced during application of torque) is transferred to the wheel primarily due to the friction present between the facings of the nut and the bolt, due to the tension from the tightening of the lug nuts. Three lug nuts evenly around the circle are enough to hold two planes together, but lose just one and there's an issue, hence the rise of four nut wheels. When alloy wheels became popular there was a rise in accidents due to wheel loss, attributed eventually to the fact that stiffer alloy wheels transmitted more instantaneous force to a given lug (against the nut tension) versus more pliant cast wheels that spread load out more, and the easiest fix was to add an additional lug and nut combo to get the total to five. Like anything with a for-sale tag on it though, marketing plays a significant part and many cars have five nuts instead of four to "look" more aggressive (for those that notice such things), and it's a cheap enough difference anyway. Anything under 10,000 lb GVW is considered light-duty, and anything over five lugs is mostly marketing if the wheel and nut combo is properly engineered (and fastened!).
 

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And what is the fastening torque used in F1? I’m guessing it’s HIGH. Whether it’s marketing, or safety margin for normal consumers who may need to handle a tire change with hand tools (and no torque wrench) on the side of the road, it seems having 6 lug nut is the “standard” in midsize and half-ton trucks. I would have preferred Rivian kept with that standard. If nothing else, it opens up a larger number of aftermarket wheel options.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
And what is the fastening torque used in F1? I’m guessing it’s HIGH. Whether it’s marketing, or safety margin for normal consumers who may need to handle a tire change with hand tools (and no torque wrench) on the side of the road, it seems having 6 lug nut is the “standard” in midsize and half-ton trucks. I would have preferred Rivian kept with that standard. If nothing else, it opens up a larger number of aftermarket wheel options.
Yeah It's been standard for the F-150 and Silverado. Ram actually had a 5 bolt pattern until 2019 and they switched to a 6 bolt pattern.
 
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