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According to Rivian the L1/L2 EVSE that comes with the R1T and R1S will be NEMA 14-50 and limited to 32A. The hard wired optional EVSE will be 60A, and the onboard charger will be 11kW. Are there any other specs we should be aware of?
 

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Where did you get the information on the hard wired optional EVSE? Is there an estimated price on that yet?
It was in response to a question sent to Rivian's customer support team. They have been super responsive via email, chat and social media. As for price, they haven't gone that much into detail with anything yet. I guess that will slowly change as we get closer and closer to taking delivery.
 

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Not doing anything yet with regards to this in case the options change. Prior to taking delivery would have to get that outlet installed since this is our first EV. Hope they support a 30AMP outlet as well.
 

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In order for an EVSE to supply 48A (11KW) the circuit breaker must be 60A and it must be hardwired. The breaker and any connector must only be used at 80% of the rating. For plug in (i.e. NEMA 14-50) the maximum current is 40A (9KW), and the breaker needs to be 50A.

My Charge Point Home EVSE supports 48A, but I set it to limit to 40A, because I am using a connector and a 50A breaker. My Bolt only draws 32A, but when I get my Rivian, it will draw 40A, even though it is capable of 48A. The actual current is the lower of what the vehicle will take or what the EVSE will provide.
 

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In order for an EVSE to supply 48A (11KW) the circuit breaker must be 60A and it must be hardwired. The breaker and any connector must only be used at 80% of the rating. For plug in (i.e. NEMA 14-50) the maximum current is 40A (9KW), and the breaker needs to be 50A.

My Charge Point Home EVSE supports 48A, but I set it to limit to 40A, because I am using a connector and a 50A breaker. My Bolt only draws 32A, but when I get my Rivian, it will draw 40A, even though it is capable of 48A. The actual current is the lower of what the vehicle will take or what the EVSE will provide.
I'm doing the exact thing with my Bolt. I thought I was reading my post. We are doing things right.
 

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I am ready for whatever onboard AC charger Rivian installs. We have a dual head Wattzilla 80 amp charger.
 

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In anticipation, I have hardwired a ChargePoint CPH50 in my garage using 6/2 THHW MC cable with ground to a 70 amp breaker. The wire is rated at 75 amps and the CPH50 is rated to hook up to a 80 amp circuit (although the unit itself only accepts 6AWG?). Since EVSEs are constant draws, the max load on the wire is 56 amps, which safely maximizes the CPH50's highest charge rate of 50 amps and ~47 miles an hour.
 

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Merrill--Depends on the EVSE you use... If your EVSE has a 6-50 plug for example, you would need an adapter. Cheap though...
 

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The vehicle onboard charger maxes out at 11kW. With anticipated consumption of approximately 450Wh/mi, the most you can add back to a Rivian with one hour on a Level 2 charger is about 24 miles (11,000 W / 450 Wh/mi = 24.4 mi/hr).

The Rivian is a heavier and less aerodynamic vehicle than most other EVs on the market and needs more energy to propel itself over each mile. It's less efficient and has higher consumption. All this means that a different EV might be able to go much further (in miles) after spending the same amount of time on an 11kW charger.
 

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The vehicle onboard charger maxes out at 11kW. With anticipated consumption of approximately 450Wh/mi, the most you can add back to a Rivian with one hour on a Level 2 charger is about 24 miles (11,000 W / 450 Wh/mi = 24.4 mi/hr).

The Rivian is a heavier and less aerodynamic vehicle than most other EVs on the market and needs more energy to propel itself over each mile. It's less efficient and has higher consumption. All this means that a different EV might be able to go much further (in miles) after spending the same amount of time on an 11kW charger.
Thanks for the explanation! Certainly behooves everyone to wire-up for a larger charger!
 
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