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This is a really good question with a fundamental relation to vehicle use. It really gets you thinking. My winter driving instructors taught me a number of things, and I wonder how these apply in an EV situation. And I relay these to my kids and anyone else who wants some tips on snowy/icy driving. 1. Drive like there is an egg under your foot. No rapid mashing of brake or accelerator. 2. Do one thing at a time. Brake, accelerate, steer but never together. 3. When there is a chance of skidding (like when you are about to go down a snow covered hill) or when you start to skid, pop it in to neutral and 4. pump the brakes: ON>Release>ON>Release etc till you stop skidding or make it to the bottom of the hill (hopefully under control). 5. Steer into the skid which takes a lot of practice and courage.

So can you pop the Rivian into neutral? Does ABS work by using the braking system or the regen system or both? I can imagine the regen system overslowing the vehicle and precipitating a skid. And what about traction control? On my wife's 540iA, you had to turn off the traction control so the wheels could spin in order to climb our snow covered hill. Leaving traction control engaged would overcompensate and stop the wheels turning. I still think a good set of Blizzaks (or others) eliminates 75% of winter driving problems(as long as you use the 5 recommendations from above).
 

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Yes indeed. Practice. Get the feel of a car pushing into a corner, or snap oversteer when you punch it (rwd) on a slick surface. Learn how not to panic and how to recover. Unfortunately, in Northern NJ, the cops are really tight sphinctered (and rightfully so) when they see someone hooliganing (loved that term) in a parking lot. Too much liability. Even if you are there to have a car control clinic with your teen driver. The state required instruction teaches them how to obey the law. But I think half of the 6 hours would be better spent on a skid pad.

I will be very interested to learn how the EV dynamics play in all of this. The fact that the batteries and therefore the center of gravity is so low in these EVs must help. My wife's 540 was a bulky, heavy, powerful car with 50/50 weight balance. It was RWD,. But with Blizzaks and a light foot, it was very controllable in the substantial snow/slush of NJ. I can see how settings for different road conditions would be helpful. I just need to get a Rivian before my 2008 200K MDX dies. Otherwise it will be another thermal engine for me. Come on Rivian! Get them built. I am sooo ready!
 

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I agree with everything except this. Lower gear is far better than neutral when going down a hill. It provides a nice constant resistance to all four wheels (if you have 4WD) and helps keep speed down without relying on brakes which tend to lockup more easily. Additional brake pumping may be needed on really steep inclines, but I’d never put my car in neutral in snow/ice. You’ll lose a lot of control and recovery options when you do that.

As to whether you can put an EV in neutral, yes you can. That’s needed to allow the car to go thru automated car washes as well as other things.
My experience is far different from yours. In neutral, the wheels are no longer being driven. The only thing propelling the vehicle then are the kinetic energy (similar to momentum) and gravity. So you take out the wheels being connected to the engine which is a source of forward movement. Now you have only 2 sources of propulsion of the vehicle to contend with, momentum and gravity. An if you start out VERY slowly, you can minimize kinetic energy's influence over the vehicle. Keep pumping those brakes as you gain a little speed as you descend the hill. If you leave it in gear, the motor at idle is still providing rotation to the wheels countering your braking. I eliminate that by being in neutral. I control the speed through braking, not allowing any additional movement via the engine. I found that the speed that the vehicle wants to travel at while in the lowest gear may be too fast for conditions. Neutral puts me in control of the speed. And in a skid I definitely don't want the engine turning the wheels. It works very well for me. Your experience is different. It is what you are comfortable with and have experience with that you should continue to employ. I respect your opinion.

And as for losing control and recovery options I have a lot of experience watching that. I am one of those rescue people that sits in a medical car and responds to motorsports crashes. Once a skid has begun, we say "Mr. Newton was driving" and very few have the ability/skill to power out of loss of adhesion to the track. Especially when they make it on to wet grass. They end up in a barrier, or in a gravel trap, or some run-off area. I find that dirt track drivers who migrate to asphalt often have the skill to recover from a skid because they are used to sliding the car all over the track. Tony Stewart is a great example of that. Yes, the speeds are much higher, but Mr. Newton has something to say in all crashes.
 
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