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Anyone happened to know the brand of shocks ?
Seem to be pretty complex, want to fund out more about durability.
 

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Anyone happened to know the brand of shocks ?
Seem to be pretty complex, want to fund out more about durability.
Its said that the Rivian R1T's suspension system uses components already used on other vehicles. Like with many other areas of the R1T and R1S that will use proven parts. Its just not yet clear where they are sourcing them from.
 

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Anyone happened to know the brand of shocks ?
Seem to be pretty complex, want to fund out more about durability.
Eons ago (30+ years) I bought a Subaru with an air shock system that could lift the car a couple of inches (they touted it as useful in snow). The only other manufacturer I knew of with a similar system was Lincoln. Had a rear unit fail in year 1. Although I didn't pay for it, it was a $4,000 repair, on a car that was around $20,000. The other rear unit failed 6 months later. Once again, no cost to me but equally expensive. I went ballistic on the dealer for selling a car with an untested, unreliable and expensive suspension. We worked out a deal and he took it back in trade on a more conventional suspension model which lasted 14 years without any problems to speak of (other than rust, which turned out to be a problem late in its life). Anyhow, lesson learned. It's more refined these days so I'm less concerned.
 

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Air suspension has come a long way and is common for many manufacturers. Its still pricey to repair (so warranty is important) and in cold weather, I have seen problems resulting from condensation (freeze/melt/extreme cold). Makes for a nice ride, and in certain cases, slight lowering could provide better range for HWY driving for example. I think the original Audi Quattros had air, and the newer Volvos have air (as an option with certain models & "offroad mode"), BMW had 2 axle air, etc
 

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Eons ago (30+ years) I bought a Subaru with an air shock system that could lift the car a couple of inches (they touted it as useful in snow). The only other manufacturer I knew of with a similar system was Lincoln. Had a rear unit fail in year 1. Although I didn't pay for it, it was a $4,000 repair, on a car that was around $20,000. The other rear unit failed 6 months later. Once again, no cost to me but equally expensive. I went ballistic on the dealer for selling a car with an untested, unreliable and expensive suspension. We worked out a deal and he took it back in trade on a more conventional suspension model which lasted 14 years without any problems to speak of (other than rust, which turned out to be a problem late in its life). Anyhow, lesson learned. It's more refined these days so I'm less concerned.
I opted not to get the air suspension on my Volvo because of reliability concerns. Even in 2021 the forums are rife with owners having air suspension issues, both in and out of warranty.

It's a big concern for me, with Rivian. Time will tell how it goes. I expect it will be one of the pain points, however, since I believe Rivian is buying an off-the-shelf air setup like most other manufacturers.
 

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My Range Rover Sport has air suspension. And my previous car, the Land Rover LR3, had it, too. No reliability problems with either vehicle and the ride quality and handling is amazing. Everyone who rides in my car comments on how comfortable and refined it is. Plus the adjustable ride height is really nice when off-roading, in deep snow, etc. I would not own an SUV without air suspension.
 

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My RR Velar hasn't had any reliability issues either. It has had multiple infotainment issues, but mechanically it's been fine. The air suspension is nice, definitely a worthwhile upgrade.
 

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My Range Rover Sport has air suspension. And my previous car, the Land Rover LR3, had it, too. No reliability problems with either vehicle and the ride quality and handling is amazing. Everyone who rides in my car comments on how comfortable and refined it is. Plus the adjustable ride height is really nice when off-roading, in deep snow, etc. I would not own an SUV without air suspension.
Agree, had it in my Cayenne GTS, never had any problems. Great low sport settings when driving fast and plenty of clearance when needed.
 

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When commenting on air suspension & experience, it might be interesting to see where you live and whether you drive any dirt, snow, ice covered roads. I do. And I have had air suspension issues within the last 4 years (all replaced/repaired under warranty on my wife's 2016 Volvo XC90R). This was one of the first R-Designs delivered in the Northeast, so we went through some SW, brake rotor, air suspension & general service pains initially, but it has been solid since the repairs, and the car drives like a dream with air suspension and the right tires. Putting the car into dynamic mode and tightening it up (with firmer summer tires in the warmer months) makes the thing drive like a tuned rally car. Driving in comfort mode on frost heaved or frozen/rutted dirt roads in VT with winter tires/softer compounds is super plush. Lowering on the HWY is also nice. I talked to one of the mechanics and they acknowledged that cold and condensation could have an impact, I'm sure frozen water, dirt, dust and mud all must be accounted for (just like a shock on a MTB, these things need maintenance and ruggedized components to prevent damage with minimal maintenance). How often are you really going to take apart a highly complex air suspension system to clean and maintain it on a daily driver? You probably aren't until you have a problem. Part of the reason we went the XC90 route was for cold weather performance. With Rivian's cold weather testing, I am hopeful that they did more than battery testing and I am hopeful that the Dunlop systems are ruggedized (for lack of a better term) for cold weather and offroad dusty and muddy driving conditions.
 

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I'm in western WA. I only get a few lowland snow events a year, but I do head up to the passes in the winter. Most of my driving is on surface streets and highway, but again, trips up to forest service areas are pretty common. The last two times we've had a major snowstorm it was just me and the big offroad trucks in my neighborhood stilll out on the streets. I don't do any real serious offroading (The Velar isn't really intended for that, imo), especially since she is a lease, but I've done enough with her to stress the systems 🤷
 
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