Rivian posted a new article on their site about the Camp Kitchen.


There’s a moment at every good party, no matter the size of the house or how many snacks or comfortable seats are scattered throughout, when everyone ends up in the kitchen.
But does the same apply when the party is in the wilderness and you’ve brought the kitchen with you?


Rachel Jewkes has cooked plenty of meals using the Camp Kitchen – soup, pasta, even Thanksgiving dinner – and her skills were about to be put to the next, great test. Rachel, an Australian mechanical engineer who helped lead the development of the Camp Kitchen, was headed out on an overnight camping trip with some colleagues from the Rivian Adventure Gear team. The early spring trip would be their first opportunity in quite some time to get together to cook, camp and enjoy some of the things they’ve developed before the gear heads off to customers.




Rachel Jewkes, Kaitlyn Benoit and Bar Sarig begin dinner prep while teammate Lindsey Cross looks on.

Rachel Jewkes, Kaitlyn Benoit and Bar Sarig begin dinner prep while teammate Lindsey Cross looks on.

On a Saturday morning, as Rachel was packing up an R1T at Rivian’s design studio, CEO RJ Scaringe walked up and asked where she was going. When she told him, he asked if he could come along with his wife Meagan and their three boys.
“I’ll send you the pin,” Rachel told RJ – a pin, because they would be driving not toward an address or even a campground, but to a Bureau of Land Management spot in the desert wilderness just outside Joshua Tree National Park.


“My heart rate was racing most of the way there. There was just so much building up to this moment. ”

Rachel J., Mechanical Engineer
A Moveable Feast - Rivian Stories
Rachel loaded a cooler and gear into an R1T with the internal codename “Paprika” (there’s another called “Thyme”) and started the two-and-a-half-hour drive toward the campsite. She drove solo, alone with her excited thoughts.
“My heart rate was racing most of the way there,” Rachel said. “Did I have everything? Was there enough food? It was all the regular anticipation that comes with hosting a dinner heightened by the fact I was about to use the kitchen on an actual camping trip for the first time, and to cook for RJ and his family. There was just so much building up to this moment.”



Rachel, Paprika and the Camp Kitchen make their arrival.

The people imagining and designing Rivian’s current and future lineup of Adventure Gear come from a broad range of experiences, said Aaron Weast, Director of Adventure Products. With backgrounds including aerospace, audio, agriculture, robotics, software and sports equipment, team members bring unique perspectives to creating Rivian gear.
“We come from all different places, but we are all people who are passionate about the outdoors and adventures and the benefits of getting outside. The thing we all have in common is the desire to help create incredible experiences for people,” Aaron said. “That requires thinking beyond the product itself to the life of the product, the impact of the product on the world, and the kinds of adventures it will enable.”


"We’re very much just getting started. Our team’s job is to use these incredible vehicles as a platform to do more – to unlock all kinds of adventures."

Aaron W., Rivian Adventure Products

The first run of Rivian Adventure Gear comes in many flavors. There’s gear for hauling your favorite things: Cargo Crossbars with mounts for bikes, snowboards, kayaks, stand-up paddle boards. There’s shelter, a Rooftop Tent from Yakima featuring oversized windows and doors and a wall-to-wall foam floor that fits securely to the bed of the R1T or the roof of the R1S. There’s also gear for protection and preparedness – recovery and emergency kits. (Read the latest about Rivian’s first collection of Adventure Gear here, and dive deeper into Adventure Gear specs in the R1T configurator.)

A photo in this story

A photo in this story

Zab Steenwyk, Rivian Industrial Designer, cooks up breakfast at the 2019 Overland Expo.
A Moveable Feast - Rivian Stories
The Camp Kitchen made its first public appearance in 2019 at the Overland Expo in Flagstaff, Arizona, an annual event for outdoor and adventure travel enthusiasts. The kitchen helped demonstrate the wide-ranging potential uses for the R1T Gear Tunnel, an 11.6-cubic-foot storage compartment that runs the width of the truck and is perfect for housing everything from muddy boots and snowy skis to a fully stocked kitchen.
“The first morning at Overland, we used the kitchen to make breakfast burritos for the entire Rivian team working there, and people started smelling the breakfast burritos and walking by. And that was their introduction to this whole idea,” said Zab Steenwyk, a design strategist who helped build the first prototype.


The Camp Kitchen is spacious enough to accommodate several chefs working together on the meal.

The Camp Kitchen is spacious enough to accommodate several chefs working together on the meal.

Team Rivian was excited by the enthusiasm the Camp Kitchen garnered that weekend, and even incorporated some of the feedback they received from Overlanders. Fueled by countless boxes of her favorite marshmallow cereal, Rachel led a team from across Rivian through all kinds of iterations and design enhancements. And now, it was finally time for a long-awaited team feast prepared on the model of the Camp Kitchen headed for production.
As Rachel and Paprika pulled into the campsite in the middle of the desert wilderness, they received an ovation from those who arrived the night before. After getting set up and preparing some nibbles and drinks for the team, it was the moment of truth – the part on any cooking reality show when the chef would start looking nervous and the music would intensify.

Rachel and Kaitlyn mix up some cucumber gin and tonics for the group.

Rachel and Kaitlyn mix up some cucumber gin and tonics for the group.

However, Rachel’s happy place is in the kitchen and her idea of meditation is to spend weeks curating recipes and days preparing elaborate, seven-course meals for family and friends. With help from a few teammates, she made dinner – butternut squash and wild mushroom freekeh.
There were four people using the kitchen at once, two at the stove and two across from them prepping ingredients. Together, they created a feast for more than a dozen people, using just about every piece of the Snow Peak Kitchen Set in the process.
“There was plenty of crockery to go around, and the knives were sharp, which is key,” Rachel said. “It felt great to have everything we needed to be able to cook a beautiful meal.”
As she ate and enjoyed the good company and the music coming from the Camp Speaker (someone had changed it from country to '80s "bangers"), the waves of emotion started to hit.
“I had to take a second to just breathe,” she said. “I could not believe where I was, or what I was doing, or that this thing I’d been working on for so long now existed in the wild.”


A photo in this story

A photo in this story

After dinner, teammates Lindsey Cross and Jon Salerno wash and dry; RJ helps his son toast a marshmallow over the campfire.

The team enjoyed dinner together, taking in the scenery and reveling in the rare opportunity to connect in person after months and months of social distancing and collaborating remotely. As the sun neared the horizon and the desert began to cool off, Rachel noticed it.
“We’d finished our dinner out in the wilderness, this amazing feast, and the music was still going, and the sun was setting in the distance. And I realized there was hardly anyone by the campfire but there were a bunch of people gathered around the Camp Kitchen,” Rachel said. “We’d already finished washing up by then, but everyone had just … stayed. That was the defining moment for me.”