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I saw the same article this morning and am there with you @Wildabeest. The only explanation that makes any sense to me is that this is a deliberate attempt to make sure that recharging is as inconvenient and costly as possible.

Just as puzzling is the continued existence of the Texas law prohibiting direct sales to customers, also highlighted in the article. It's more than a bit ironic that even though Tesla moved their HQ to Texas and invested billions of dollars in a new manufacturing facility there, they are still not allowed to sell their cars directly to residents of the state.
 

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I will never understand TX politics.
Issue appears to be Tesla applied based on proprietary Tesla connector vs. going all CCS. In which case. TX made the right decision.

Also it is not clear Tesla was going to allow access to all EV's.

Tesla should resubmit with all CCS plugs and allowing public access as intended by the original Federal legislation that is funding the chargers.
 

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Tesla should resubmit with all CCS plugs and allowing public access as intended by the original Federal legislation that is funding the chargers.
How would that benefit Tesla owners when there is no CCS adapter? Furthermore, this is not a Federal Program, this is a Texas state program. I would submit that they were turned down because Texas is first and foremost an oil & gas state and the oil & gas industry has very deep pockets with which to “influence” all elected state officials. The fact that the approved EV chargers will be installed mainly at existing gasoline stations says it all.
 

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How would that benefit Tesla owners when there is no CCS adapter?
It wouldn't though Tesla could sell the CCS1 adapter as it does in EU and make 200% profit on that.

But the issue is not benefit to Tesla but the general public. The Federal money is to build out a universal charging network and Tesla asked for money for a proprietary one and was correctly refused by TX.
 

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The Texas legislature has been bought and paid for by both the oil and gas lobby and the auto dealer lobby. Their actions have been blatant and clear. They have been anti-Tesla because of the direct sales model. The question I have is will this behavior extend to other direct sales manufacturers (Rivian, Lucid, etc.) and to the EV community in general?
 

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The Texas legislature has been bought and paid for by both the oil and gas lobby and the auto dealer lobby. Their actions have been blatant and clear. They have been anti-Tesla because of the direct sales model. The question I have is will this behavior extend to other direct sales manufacturers (Rivian, Lucid, etc.) and to the EV community in general?
You're quite right about the franchised dealership lobby...there's a $2500 "alternative fuel vehicle" rebate program in Texas; that's in addition to the potential $7500 federal tax credit. But the Texas rebate is only available to you if you purchased your vehicle at a "franchised dealership" in Texas. So yeah, Tesla, Rivian, etc buyers don't qualify. I know this because I have benefited from the State's rebate program when I purchased a hybrid Cadillac CT6...and got the full $2500 (and a 1099 to go with it...sheesh). But I was told that my R1T would not qualify...
 

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You're quite right about the franchised dealership lobby.
A very different issue than the charging network, this topic. In this case TX made the right decision, until Tesla uses CCS plug as must in EU for similar reasons and offer its network to general public, which is also does in EU, Tesla should not be getting an taxpayer dollars.

On the car franchise laws, amusing since Musk moved to TX to avoid paying the CA income tax that helped Tesla get started with $2B in various credits and loans but TX has not returned the favor of Tesla plant in Austin or the SpaceX facilities in Brownsville with a loosening of the car franchise laws.

Seems easy enough for Rivian to sign someone up as their "franchise dealership" to qualify buyers for the $2,500 but it is a $70-$100k vehicle so likely not a show stopper for that customer demographic.
 

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Why would Tesla do that? They are not going to build charging stations that don’t support Tesla or require an adapter for Tesla’s. The application was for a universal station that supports both charging standards. I can’t speak to how they planned on doing that or if they intended to limit to Tesla’s only. If there was something amiss about that they could reapply if they felt it was worth it.
 

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They are not going to build charging stations that don’t support Tesla or require an adapter for Tesla’s.
No problemo...then don't apply for taxpayer dollars for Tesla proprietary equipment. And no, it was not clear that Tesla was abiding by the rules (Musk rarely does) that the Tesla chargers would be available to public and have CCS1 plugs. Currently Tesla does not do that in the US while EU requires Tesla to put CCS plugs and sockets on car and chargers. That still doesn't answer the access issue as Tesla has only done that in very limited markets.
 

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A very different issue than the charging network, this topic. In this case TX made the right decision, until Tesla uses CCS plug as must in EU for similar reasons and offer its network to general public, which is also does in EU, Tesla should not be getting an taxpayer dollars.

On the car franchise laws, amusing since Musk moved to TX to avoid paying the CA income tax that helped Tesla get started with $2B in various credits and loans but TX has not returned the favor of Tesla plant in Austin or the SpaceX facilities in Brownsville with a loosening of the car franchise laws.

Seems easy enough for Rivian to sign someone up as their "franchise dealership" to qualify buyers for the $2,500 but it is a $70-$100k vehicle so likely not a show stopper for that customer demographic.
Why would they do that? What you suggest is as an easy task of having franchise dealers is a completely different business model. It also subjects the company and its customers to middle men who add little value while adding costs and a loss of control at the corporate level. Having franchise dealers is an outdated business model that Tesla proved was easily disrupted and shifted profits and control to the corporate level. To prove my point, Ford's profit margins are at best 8% while Tesla's profit margin is twice that and growing. There is a reason that car dealership owners have yachts. They get the lions share of the profits while the corporation does the research, development. design, manufacturing, distribution, marketing, dealer support, and more. It's a broken model.
 

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No problemo...then don't apply for taxpayer dollars for Tesla proprietary equipment. And no, it was not clear that Tesla was abiding by the rules (Musk rarely does) that the Tesla chargers would be available to public and have CCS1 plugs. Currently Tesla does not do that in the US while EU requires Tesla to put CCS plugs and sockets on car and chargers. That still doesn't answer the access issue as Tesla has only done that in very limited markets.
 

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Based on the story the state is paying 5x what Tesla offered and the stations would have supported both Tesla and CSS. Only newer Tesla’s support CSS fast charging with an adapter so no way they are going to build stations without Tesla plugs. So as the story says Texas is going to get 170 stations instead of 700. Guess it’s true, everything is smaller in Texas. I don’t actually care because I don’t live there but it seems like kind of an insane thing for the state to do assuming non-Tesla owners could have used these stations. I own 2 EV’s (Bolt, model Y) and my Rivian has shipped and I’d be cool with a Tesla charging station having two plugs or needing an adapter to let my Rivian use it.
 

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No evidence that Tesla was going to put CCS plugs that Tesla's cannot use on Tesla chargers.
Old Tesla’s do not have the electronics to support CSS fast charging. So even if you have the CSS adapter it won’t DC fast charge. My Model Y does support it but it’s relatively new, you can check in the Tesla UI which tells you if it’s supported. Anyway, this is why any network Tesla builds in the US will have either only Tesla plugs or a combo Tesla CSS. I doubt Tesla even cares much about this in the first place, just seems like a stupid thing for the state to do given the cost diffrence.
 

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Old Tesla’s do not have the electronics to support CSS fast charging.
Vast majority, all 3's and Y's do as do current S and X's. Older S/X's have a fix that was applied in EU to allow them to use CCS. It was $500 for older S and X's but 90% of current Tesla's can use CCS with an adapter.

On current Tesla's there is a spot where it notes CCS adapter but it is still grayed out. Waiting for Tesla to provide the same $200 ($20 cost) CCS adapter it does in EU.

To this issue, there's no evidence Tesla was going to build CCS plugged chargers or had any way for non-Tesla users to pay for it so Tesla application for funding for public chargers accessible to all was correctly rejected.


 

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Vast majority, all 3's and Y's do as do current S and X's. Older S/X's have a fix that was applied in EU to allow them to use CCS. It was $500 for older S and X's but 90% of current Tesla's can use CCS with an adapter.

On current Tesla's there is a spot where it notes CCS adapter but it is still grayed out. Waiting for Tesla to provide the same $200 ($20 cost) CCS adapter is does in EU.

To this issue, there's no evidence Tesla was going to build CCS plugged chargers or had any way for non-Tesla users to pay for it so Tesla application for funding for public chargers accessible to all was correctly rejected.


Nice adapter, how many amps in real world? The ones I see online are like $600+ dollars now and Tesla does not seem to be selling their’s yet. From what I’ve read the Tesla version was suppose to support 100amps so it might be worth spending bucks to get a higher power version.
 

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Nice adapter, how many amps in real world? The ones I see online are like $600+ dollars now and Tesla does not seem to be selling their’s yet. From what I’ve read the Tesla version was suppose to support 100amps so it might be worth spending bucks to get a higher power version.
I think it does 50kWh on the ChargePoint and EA's that I've used it. Lectron just refunded my purchase as the Tesla updates keep disabling it and they just can't keep up with firmware updates, at least on the Macs. Might be easier on a PC as it looks like their firmware updater is Windows based.

Tesla CCS adapter in EU does 142kW.
 
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