Rivian Forum – Rivian R1T & R1S News, Pricing & Order... banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
2019 Zero SR/F and 2018, BMW i3
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I was contacted by Tesla to confirm the installation of the Tesla solar roof for this spring, and I am wondering if you guys have any insight on Tesla Solar Roof---or any other solar panel for that matter. I am specially interested in Virginia.

When I did the pre-order I had in my mind that with 3 electric vehicles (1 Zero Sr/F + 1 BMW i3 + hopefully 1 R1S) it would make sense to add the roof. And my current roof is relatively old at 18 so would need replacing in the next 5 years or so anyways. However, now that I am looking at the 48k cost (40k after tax credits) it make me wonder if it is indeed worth it.

The current design they sent me generates 12.7 kW per year and doesn't include powerwalls. I appreciate any thoughts :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
That cost sounds extreme, to me.

I recently read an article about a large Tesla solar roof install (A look at Tesla's biggest Solar Roof install: A massive 44 kW system - Electrek) and the owner said that the cost was approximately 35% more than the cost to replace the roof and buy a traditional solar panel system of similar capacity/capability.

Why pay that much of a price premium? I'd rather install a standing-seam metal roof and an array of more conventional panels. They look fine, the roof will last basically forever, and I can upgrade the array or expand it, down the road.
 

·
Registered
R1T Max Pack
Joined
·
33 Posts
That cost sounds extreme, to me.

I recently read an article about a large Tesla solar roof install (A look at Tesla's biggest Solar Roof install: A massive 44 kW system - Electrek) and the owner said that the cost was approximately 35% more than the cost to replace the roof and buy a traditional solar panel system of similar capacity/capability.

Why pay that much of a price premium? I'd rather install a standing-seam metal roof and an array of more conventional panels. They look fine, the roof will last basically forever, and I can upgrade the array or expand it, down the road.
We are building now and doing just that - a standing seam metal roof (also safe for rainwater collection) and solar panels - it's a bit more future proof and rain resistance. The Tesla roof isn't THAT well proven just yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
We are building now and doing just that - a standing seam metal roof (also safe for rainwater collection) and solar panels - it's a bit more future proof and rain resistance. The Tesla roof isn't THAT well proven just yet.
Could you share the details of your build? Would love to see exactly what goes into it.
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Hi everyone,

I was contacted by Tesla to confirm the installation of the Tesla solar roof for this spring, and I am wondering if you guys have any insight on Tesla Solar Roof---or any other solar panel for that matter. I am specially interested in Virginia.

When I did the pre-order I had in my mind that with 3 electric vehicles (1 Zero Sr/F + 1 BMW i3 + hopefully 1 R1S) it would make sense to add the roof. And my current roof is relatively old at 18 so would need replacing in the next 5 years or so anyways. However, now that I am looking at the 48k cost (40k after tax credits) it make me wonder if it is indeed worth it.

The current design they sent me generates 12.7 kW per year and doesn't include powerwalls. I appreciate any thoughts :)
This article might be able to give you an idea on what alternatives there are to the Tesla solar roof.


From the article there's:

Dow Powerhouse solar shingles

  • Install price: $3.89 per Watt
  • Product warranty: 11 years.
  • Weather-performance warranty: 25 years.
Certainteed Apollo solar shingles
  • Install price: $4.90 per Watt
  • Installation and workmanship warranty: 25 years.
  • Power output warranty: 25 years.
  • Inverter and other components: 10 years.
  • 110 mile per hour wind warranty: 10 years.
SunTegra solar shingles
  • Install price: SunTegra doesn’t list the cost on their website, but numbers circulating around the web indicate $3.65 per Watt.
  • Product warranty: 10 years.
  • Power output warranty: 25 years.
 

·
Registered
R1S, Forrest Green/Black
Joined
·
58 Posts
We have solar panels on our roof, which was only about 6 years old when we did it. Totally our system is 55 panels and generates somewhere in the range of 14-16kW per year. I didn't buy it as it is a lease/utility. Overall it shaved about 40% of our electric bill, with summer being our highest. Some months our bill is negative, usually the mildest months.

When we go EV that will just help with costs because we generate the power ourselves.
 

·
Registered
2019 Zero SR/F and 2018, BMW i3
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the article! They seem to be very favorable to Tesla roof when doing the comparison. The main downside they point out is availability which in my case it's not a problem.

I was in the phone with a representative from Tesla today and she claims I could get the roof installed in the spring if I confirm my order this week.
This article might be able to give you an idea on what alternatives there are to the Tesla solar roof.


From the article there's:

Dow Powerhouse solar shingles
  • Install price: $3.89 per Watt
  • Product warranty: 11 years.
  • Weather-performance warranty: 25 years.
Certainteed Apollo solar shingles
  • Install price: $4.90 per Watt
  • Installation and workmanship warranty: 25 years.
  • Power output warranty: 25 years.
  • Inverter and other components: 10 years.
  • 110 mile per hour wind warranty: 10 years.
SunTegra solar shingles
  • Install price: SunTegra doesn’t list the cost on their website, but numbers circulating around the web indicate $3.65 per Watt.
  • Product warranty: 10 years.
  • Power output warranty: 25 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I've been in the PV industry since 2004 and suggest avoiding the national firms. You'll find better customer service and more competitive pricing with local installers. Get a few quotes and references. If you have the ability to purchase or finance as opposed to lease/ppa then please consider this. There are low interest loans for solar. Also - the residential tax credit was extended so there is still a great federal incentive. There may be additional incentives depending on your state. Some internet searching will yield great results!

I could write a book for you but will avoid a lengthy post - let me know if there are specific questions I can help with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
Thanks for the article! They seem to be very favorable to Tesla roof when doing the comparison. The main downside they point out is availability which in my case it's not a problem.

I was in the phone with a representative from Tesla today and she claims I could get the roof installed in the spring if I confirm my order this week.
Here's another article if you're interested that has some other alternative options.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
I've been in the PV industry since 2004 and suggest avoiding the national firms. You'll find better customer service and more competitive pricing with local installers. Get a few quotes and references. If you have the ability to purchase or finance as opposed to lease/ppa then please consider this. There are low interest loans for solar. Also - the residential tax credit was extended so there is still a great federal incentive. There may be additional incentives depending on your state. Some internet searching will yield great results!

I could write a book for you but will avoid a lengthy post - let me know if there are specific questions I can help with.
Do you have any recommendations for which solar shingle manufacturer to go with?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Do you have any recommendations for which solar shingle manufacturer to go with?
Unfortunately I cant recommend the shingle product. I've used the first gen of the product many years ago and would not use it again. From a maintenance, efficiency and cost standpoint - nothing beats the standard module on a rack. The aesthetic of a "solar panel" is a personal preference and can be a dealbreaker for some homeowners. It is the best way to go however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
@hazelnutz18 have you (or anyone else reading this, @Sultanum) done the math on what the tax credit works out to be in your case? In addition to federal credits that will be standard for everyone, any available state and/or local credits can make the overall savings vary.

This is an example based on a $10,000 solar setup:

"You are eligible for a 30% tax credit equally $3000 If you owe $5000 federal taxes at the end of the year, the solar tax credit will lower your tax liability to $2000 that year. This tax credit has been extend at 30% to 2019 and will lower by 4% each year until it expires on December 31, 2021 at 22%."

Haven't gotten that far on my end yet but curious to see what numbers everyone else is getting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
@hazelnutz18 have you (or anyone else reading this, @Sultanum) done the math on what the tax credit works out to be in your case? In addition to federal credits that will be standard for everyone, any available state and/or local credits can make the overall savings vary.

This is an example based on a $10,000 solar setup:

"You are eligible for a 30% tax credit equally $3000 If you owe $5000 federal taxes at the end of the year, the solar tax credit will lower your tax liability to $2000 that year. This tax credit has been extend at 30% to 2019 and will lower by 4% each year until it expires on December 31, 2021 at 22%."

Haven't gotten that far on my end yet but curious to see what numbers everyone else is getting.
The tax credit was extended for 2 years at 26%:

It is not the same type of tax incentive as with an EV. Its an actual credit and if you cant monetize it in a year then it carries forward. It's really a great incentive.

Here is a good website that can help identify state incentives:

The average size PV system (not based on electric usage, simply what has been installed nationally) is 7 to 8kWp (the DC size e.g. module nameplate). The typical residential cost is ~$3/Wp (dollar per watt DC). So a good guess is that a system will cost $20-25k and you can expect $5-6k tax credit.

Simple payback differs based on location (how much sun you receive and therefore how much energy the system generates) and additional incentives. A system in NJ or MA will typically have a 3-4 year payback where in PA or DE it'll be 7-9 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi everyone,

I was contacted by Tesla to confirm the installation of the Tesla solar roof for this spring, and I am wondering if you guys have any insight on Tesla Solar Roof---or any other solar panel for that matter. I am specially interested in Virginia.

When I did the pre-order I had in my mind that with 3 electric vehicles (1 Zero Sr/F + 1 BMW i3 + hopefully 1 R1S) it would make sense to add the roof. And my current roof is relatively old at 18 so would need replacing in the next 5 years or so anyways. However, now that I am looking at the 48k cost (40k after tax credits) it make me wonder if it is indeed worth it.

The current design they sent me generates 12.7 kW per year and doesn't include powerwalls. I appreciate any thoughts :)

Get an estimate for a 50 year roof for your house, then compare that with the cost of the TESLA solar panels of that size, and see how that compares to the $45k My house in MD the roof was $23k here in colroado ihave 100 year roof, concrete tiles, and put on the XL tesla system with 2 powerwalls for $45k .... also since you are in VA join the VA N VA tesla owners group, several members have put on the soalr panels and solar roof recently....
 

·
Registered
2019 Zero SR/F and 2018, BMW i3
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
@hazelnutz18 have you (or anyone else reading this, @Sultanum) done the math on what the tax credit works out to be in your case? In addition to federal credits that will be standard for everyone, any available state and/or local credits can make the overall savings vary.

This is an example based on a $10,000 solar setup:

"You are eligible for a 30% tax credit equally $3000 If you owe $5000 federal taxes at the end of the year, the solar tax credit will lower your tax liability to $2000 that year. This tax credit has been extend at 30% to 2019 and will lower by 4% each year until it expires on December 31, 2021 at 22%."

Haven't gotten that far on my end yet but curious to see what numbers everyone else is getting.
I look into the incentives but unfortunately Virginia doesn't have any. The net metering program in pretty good though because it pays in i the actual rate.

Unfortunately I cant recommend the shingle product. I've used the first gen of the product many years ago and would not use it again. From a maintenance, efficiency and cost standpoint - nothing beats the standard module on a rack. The aesthetic of a "solar panel" is a personal preference and can be a dealbreaker for some homeowners. It is the best way to go however.
That is a point for me, and my HOA as well. It would be a problem to install the panels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Hi everyone,

I was contacted by Tesla to confirm the installation of the Tesla solar roof for this spring, and I am wondering if you guys have any insight on Tesla Solar Roof---or any other solar panel for that matter. I am specially interested in Virginia.

When I did the pre-order I had in my mind that with 3 electric vehicles (1 Zero Sr/F + 1 BMW i3 + hopefully 1 R1S) it would make sense to add the roof. And my current roof is relatively old at 18 so would need replacing in the next 5 years or so anyways. However, now that I am looking at the 48k cost (40k after tax credits) it make me wonder if it is indeed worth it.

The current design they sent me generates 12.7 kW per year and doesn't include powerwalls. I appreciate any thoughts :)
Ouch big roof? I could see that price with a few power walls
Thats some serious money
 

·
Registered
2019 Zero SR/F and 2018, BMW i3
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Ouch big roof? I could see that price with a few power walls
Thats some serious money
Yeah, I know. The roof is about 3000 sqft. It is big, not huge though. In any case, it is much cheaper than the R1S and saves you money over time :)

I haven't decided on it. Something came up and I will wait a bit more to decide on that. My roof is still good for another 5 years so there is not rush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
I look into the incentives but unfortunately Virginia doesn't have any. The net metering program in pretty good though because it pays in i the actual rate.
Good to know. I guess it also help to take a long term view at the costs and where the setup starts to pay for itself. Stats of a 5-10 year view should be interesting. If anyone has done the homework on that I'd love to see.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top