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I came across this interesting article from Forbes about whether or not 50kW is the future of EV charging instead of 250 kW.

Carmakers and charging stations have been engaging in a “mine’s bigger than yours” competition with their high speed DC charging stations. Tesla TSLA +10.8% paved the way by installing a network of 120KW chargers which later were upgraded to 150kw. Porsche demonstrated a 350KW charger for its Taycan. Tesla upgraded its newest stations to deliver 250KW. Non-Tesla networks started with 50KW stations, but as the CCS charging system improved, new deployments, particularly on the “Electrify America” network have gone to 150KW with a few even higher.

The installation of “Level 2” chargers (which run from 3KW to 8KW) turned out to be misguided, filling the country with expensive charging stations which drivers of more recent long range electric cars almost never use. Those chargers are slow, and either free or overpriced. They only make sense in homes, work parking lots and hotels — places people routinely spend 4 or more hours. A lot of them ended up in places where people spend 30 minutes to 2 hours, like store parking lots.

Each KW will add about 4 miles of range per hour of charging, so a 150KW station, when going at full power, can theoretically add up to 600 miles of range in an hour to a car like a Tesla model 3.

Except it can’t. That’s the instantaneous rate, but that rate is only delivered at the start of the charging session, and once the battery gets over half-full (or even earlier) it drops. It might be closer to say it can add 100 miles in 10 minutes, but only on a highly-discharged (empty) car. It can’t add 200 miles in 20 minutes. Most cars only have 200-300 miles of range anyway.

Are we getting it wrong again?
Could similar misconceptions be driving the deployment of fast charging? The peak-wattage contest above is driven by what I call “gasoline thinking,” which comes when you compare electric car charging to gas stations. With gasoline thinking, you imagine you will be driving along, notice you are low and look for a “filling station” where you will plug in to top up as quickly as you can.

Electric thinking is different. There you want to charge while you are parked for some other reason. The best reason of all is sleeping, ie. in homes and hotels. With this method, you don’t care how fast the charging is, as long as it can get the job done during your stop. When you go to a gas station, your primary task is to fill up. EV charging should, ideally be your secondary task.

This is not to say that super-fast charging isn’t desired from time to time. There are times where you have no primary task to do. All other things being equal (which they aren’t) you certainly would like it to be faster. If they got it down under 5 minutes, it would compare with the gas station. There are places, like a lonely truck stop on the interstate, or a delivery fleet depot, where this is good.

All things are not, however, equal. Really high power charging is expensive to install. The charging stations are expensive, and getting megawatts of electricity into facilities is expensive. (Not as expensive as building a gas station, but still plenty.) That cost has to get paid, and usually the price of electricity at these locations can be anywhere from 2 to 5 times what you pay at home. Imagine if you could fill up at home for $2.50/gallon but the gas station on the highway was $8/gallon? Guess which station you would avoid unless absolutely necessary.

Secondly, charging at very high rates reduces the lifetime of your battery. It’s hard to pin down how much in dollars, but it’s real. Many companies are working on chargers and batteries to reduce this, but for now, you only want to do it if you need it.

For people who can charge at home, or at the office, that should still be the #1 choice for charging, and it can be done at low speed with fairly low cost equipment. Indeed, the much derided “level 1” charging, at only 5-7 mph may often be the right choice. If an office can put in 5 low-power chargers for the cost of one Level 2 charger, that might be the better choice since most cars travel only 40 miles/day. A smaller number of Level 2 can serve the subset of people who need a little more that day.

People who can’t charge at home or work, or people on road trips, need a different solution.

“Fairly Fast” charging

The answer may be to increase the deployment of what we might call “fairly fast” charging, in the 40-50kw range. These chargers are currently fairly expensive, but not nearly as expensive as chargers of 150KW or more. There are efforts to bring down the price as well. I recently spoke with “WallBox,” a European supplier who, while they would not name prices, plans to produce significantly cheaper 50KW chargers.

The cost of the charger is one thing, but the cost of bringing in high powered electrical service is also considerable. Even for an existing commercial building, adding hundreds of KW can require new electrical service and expensive wiring. 150KW is major juice with major safety risks, and that means cost.

You want “fairly fast” charging in the places where you will stop for 20 minutes to an hour. Places like restaurants, grocery stores and other major retailers, bars and meeting places. If you can get it cheap enough that it’s everywhere, it becomes a very simple process when visiting the store. It must be super easy — just plug and go, with a data protocol arranging billing right through the cable. If the store wishes to subsidize it, it should be doable by just tapping your phone on a validation dongle in the store, or even better, automatic with a digital payment at the store.

Fairly fast is also fast enough for road trips at restaurants. Even fast-food sit-down dining takes around 35 minutes for a group. The biggest problem with restaurants is they tend to do almost all their business at lunch and dinner, so road trip charging at high rates still serves a purpose. Because you must park at the charger, it is better to have chargers at restaurants than a large charging bank that is a 5-10 minute walk from the restaurants, unless there is a dining area at the charging bank for take-out.

Available power charging and RV parks
As noted, the cost of new electrical service can be a problem, particularly for a small establishment just wanting to put in 2-3 stations. Once you are building a large charging facility you are almost always putting in new electrical service.

What’s needed is fairly fast stations which are designed to monitor the total current coming into the facility, and which then never give out more power than the existing circuit can handle. Many buildings are very well provisioned, and only use a small portion of their electrical service most of the time, only using more when AC need is very high. The rest of the time they have lots of spare power.

Current electrical codes have the electrician add up the loads in a building and apply a formula to them, and this calculates the size of service that is to be installed. This formula works hard to avoid any overload, and while it’s not simply the sum of all the loads, it does presume that many of the loads might draw their full demand at the same time. That can happen with dumb loads, but it’s easy to make a car charger which responds to other loads. It can see that something else (like the air conditioner) is drawing a lot of power, and reduce how much it uses so the total stays within safe limits. Our electrical codes are only now adapting to the idea of smart devices which can do things like this, but they eventually should have no problem with this approach.

In reality, a store putting in a 50KW fairly fast charger would almost always have power for it. However, there might be a few times it doesn’t. This would slow charging down, but if that’s rare enough it’s not a problem — and it saves a lot of money compared to upgrading electrical service for those rare times. These times are also predictable in most cases, since we have reasonably accurate temperature predictions that can tell you when it’s likely that available power will be lower. Drivers who use an app to search for charging will be told that a charger is going to be at lower capacity long before they get there.

A low cost fairly fast charger which doesn’t require an electrical upgrade (even if you put in several of them) could be a winner for retailers. While it could also make sense at offices, it adds the burden of employees have to come out and move their cars to share the station. The typical employee will need perhaps 10-15KWH in a day. You could have 1 fairly fast charger which could serve perhaps 20 employees if they keep swapping out, but it might be much easier and even cheaper to just have 20 Level 1 chargers that take the whole workday.

RV parks are another interesting opportunity for cheap chargers. RV parks tend to have very high power electrical service, because they need to handle the park being full on a hot day with air conditioners running in all the RVs. When that’s not what’s happening, they have plenty of spare capacity, and they could install dynamic chargers if they came at a low enough cost. Today, fast charging stations are almost exclusively located on major highways, not out in the more rural and backcountry areas. RV parks, however, are almost everywhere. A lot of people prefer to road-trip on the back roads.

EV drivers would love the idea of no part of the road system being off-limits due to range, and they even use RV parks (at the very slow level 2 speed) today. There may not be much to do at a typical RV park in a 30 minute stop, though there are always picnic tables to have a take-out meal. Yes, people would in this case crave gasoline-style fast recharges at 150KW or more, but for now, that’s too expensive to consider for RV parks. People will tolerate needing 1-2 half-hour stops per day if it gives them the ability to drive these rural locations they otherwise could not drive at all.

The important message is to stop thinking the way we did with our gasoline cars. You want to understand where people actually will need energy, and where they will stay long enough to get it from different speeds of chargers. You have to consider the costs of the chargers, and may find that more, slower chargers makes more sense in some places, and medium and super fast chargers are right in others. Or in many cases, the answer may be a mix.
 

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Whoever wrote this is an idiot. With bigger batteries and heavier cars/trucks, a 50KW charger will not be fast enough. Only the Tesla M3 and Chevy Bolt get 4 miles/KWH. Trucks like Rivian and Hummer will be more like 2 mile/KWH. Hummer is now claiming the ability to add 100 miles in 10 minutes (@350KW), that is really good for that big heavy truck. I own an EV today and can tell you that range and DC fast charging times are king when it comes to making trips. No one is going to stop every 200 miles for lunch or shopping when on a road trip.
 

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The "idiot" author, Brad Templeton, is a long time advocate and thinker about the EV space and autonomous vehicle space. His analogy of filling up (overnight) at home costing as little as one-fourth as stopping as a refueling station is a good one that the average convert from ICE may not think about initially. If this article gives a nudge to a few more potential converts then it's had good effect.
 

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Whoever wrote this is an idiot. With bigger batteries and heavier cars/trucks, a 50KW charger will not be fast enough. Only the Tesla M3 and Chevy Bolt get 4 miles/KWH. Trucks like Rivian and Hummer will be more like 2 mile/KWH. Hummer is now claiming the ability to add 100 miles in 10 minutes (@350KW), that is really good for that big heavy truck. I own an EV today and can tell you that range and DC fast charging times are king when it comes to making trips. No one is going to stop every 200 miles for lunch or shopping when on a road trip.
The author doesn't seem to be off his rocker. We need to think about charging infrastructure as a hierarchy. In places where your car tends to be parked for 12+ hours, a 7kW Level 2 charger is great (home, hotels). In places where you spend 8+ hours, get a beefier Level 2 charger (~12kW). Places where people might typically spend ~4 hours? A less expensive 25-50kW DC Fast charger is perfect. Places where you may spend 1-2 hours, you probably want a 50-100kW DC Fast charger. And, like the article says, "This is not to say that super-fast charging isn’t desired from time to time. There are times where you have no primary task to do. All other things being equal (which they aren’t) you certainly would like it to be faster. If they got it down under 5 minutes, it would compare with the gas station. There are places, like a lonely truck stop on the interstate, or a delivery fleet depot, where this is good." So they're not arguing against vehicles being capable of 300kW charging, just that a holistic charging infrastructure is going to have a hierarchy of capacities that matches the amount of time you'd expect the vehicle to spend in the parking spot.

The "bigger batteries" are also a very gasoline-oriented way of thinking about things. Electric vehicles are a paradigm shift. They are not a complete drop-in replacement for an ICE vehicle. If you embrace the differences and build a different set of habits, I think most people would be quite happy with the 300+-mile Rivians. But so many people are stuck on bigger batteries, higher numbers, and using the EV in exactly the same manner as they've always used an ICE vehicle -- and resist change. I spent a year and roadtripped 49 US states + 7 Canadian provinces. I was in an ICE vehicle (Sprinter conversion), and I still stopped every 1-2 hours. I have to pee. The dog has to pee. I want to make a coffee, eat a sandwich. I have to pee again (see re: coffee). Here's a cute town I've never heard of, let's go take a look. All those little stops could be great ways to break up the driving, reduce fatigue & increase safety, and keep the battery topped up (if the infrastructure is there).
 

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Thanks for the thought process @timesinks. When I’m on a road trip, especially when trailering, I want a stop after a few hours to stretch and pee— have the same issue with coffee 🙄— taking a break periodically to refocus is good for me, my passengers, and everyone else on the road with me. Couldn’t agree more that changing our behaviors and expectations around “filling” our vehicles is essential— and changing behaviors around our energy use by moving away from ICE vehicles is a major part of using an EV for me.
 

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Stopping every 1-2 hours is normal, but do you want to drive 2 hours, then stop for 2 hours, then repeat? People will not adapt to that scenario. EA has a goal of placing chargers at a spacing of 70-120 miles apart across the country. While on a trip you arrive at your first stop with say a buffer of 50 miles left. The next charger is 120 miles away and you want to arrive with the same buffer. For a truck like the Rivian or Hummer EV, you will need to charge for over 2 hours at 50KW to get that range. But if you can charge at 350KW, you can add those same miles in just 12 minutes, which is plenty of time to pee and grab a coffee.

By charging at only 50 KW you effectively change the time to cover 120 miles from 2 hours to 4 hours. While this may be acceptable to some, it is not acceptable to me personally.

EA installs chargers with 150KW and 350KW capability. Rivian is planning on installing 150KW to 175KW chargers. Why? Because they want you to be able to get on with your adventure, that is why.
 

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I also forgot to mention, if you are pulling a trailer, then you can double the charging time to add 120miles, since your range could be reduced by as much as 50%. I do pull trailers and have this concern.
 

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I think you missed the whole bit about charging being a hierarchy.

If the primary purpose of your stop is to charge, the fastest charge possible is desirable (and the highest fees per kWh palatable). The linked article discussed this.

But if the primary purpose of your stop is to eat a sit down meal that is going to take an hour, a slower (not slow, but ~100kW) charger that's cheaper to install and therefore bills less money per kWh would be great.

And if you're at a ski hill where you're typically parked 8+ hours, cheap level 2 is king.
 

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I did not miss the point, I simply disagree with it. Today many 50KW chargers do not actually provide a full 50KW on a 400V system (they range from 35KW to 44KW is real use), and they also cut off charging after a time limit, in order to free up the station for someone else. EVGO currently has a time limit of 45 minutes, they originally set it to 30 minutes. It is considered rude to tie up DFDC for any longer than that, there may be another EV that really needs that quick charge.

50KW makes perfect sense for the Chevy Spark, BMW i3 and original Nissan Leaf that had 100 miles or less range. Those needed fast chargers when going around town all day. EVs are now all headed for 300+ miles range and that is sufficient around town in 99% of all cases. The real need for DFDCs is long range travel. Yes for an overnight stop L2 is good enough and that is currently covered by many hotels.
 

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I completely agree that the current deployment doesn't match the needed end state. But a 50kW charger with a 30-min time limit is inconsistent with what the article and I were arguing for. 50kW chargers belong in places where a car would otherwise sit unused for 2-4 hours. They don't make sense for locations where the primary purpose of the stop is to charge (except maybe in addition to faster chargers to provide a charge at a lower price point for a Bolt that can't take more power anyways).

It's a hierarchy. The primary goal is to think differently. When a car is parked, it could be charging. The more we build out infrastructure in places cars otherwise do nothing that targets for the typical duration of that stop, the less aggregate burden we will place on the chargers that need to go as fast as possible -- those where the primary purpose is to charge and keep going.
 

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Lets compare costs. I live in Arizona and have accounts with EVGO, Charge Point and Electrify America. I will compare EVGO and EA right now since I did use each of them in recent months, but only for 10 minutes each time, just to get me home with some margin. FYI this is the typical situation when charging locally, you do not need 1-2 hours of charging on a DFDC, and both times I sat in my car while charging.

EVGO charges $0.35 per minute. On an EVGO (or Charge Point) 50KW station with my SOC below 50% the Bolt gets 43 KW charge rate. That is .717 KWH/minute, which corresponds to $0.49 per KWH cost.

At Electrify America I get 56KW charge rate under the same conditions (150KW or 350KW station), but pay only $0.43 per KWH. Cost is better on the bigger charger.
 

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The market doesn't know what it's selling yet, and so the pricing doesn't make any sense. Until EA, nobody but Tesla even understood what they were building. All else being equal, a charge from a more expensive installation should probably cost more money per kWh. Eventually the market will realize this and you'll pay less if you can use less expensive equipment. It sounds like your local chargers have the added confusion of billing based on time, not energy. You wouldn't pay by the minute to use a gas pump, and you shouldn't be asked to do so for charging an EV.

You need some chargers "around town" but mostly for the people who cant charge at home or do long days of driving a work vehicle from site to site. These can largely be slower ones optimized for parking duration. The fastest (and most expensive for the company to purchase and install) should be focused on long distance travel routes beyond towns.
 

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Lets compare costs. I live in Arizona and have accounts with EVGO, Charge Point and Electrify America. I will compare EVGO and EA right now since I did use each of them in recent months, but only for 10 minutes each time, just to get me home with some margin. FYI this is the typical situation when charging locally, you do not need 1-2 hours of charging on a DFDC, and both times I sat in my car while charging.

EVGO charges $0.35 per minute. On an EVGO (or Charge Point) 50KW station with my SOC below 50% the Bolt gets 43 KW charge rate. That is .717 KWH/minute, which corresponds to $0.49 per KWH cost.

At Electrify America I get 56KW charge rate under the same conditions (150KW or 350KW station), but pay only $0.43 per KWH. Cost is better on the bigger charger.
azbill,
Where are there Electrify America Chargers in AZ? I am in the Phoenix Area and only been able to find Blink and a few Charge Points, the blink are slower than all get out, slower than my home charger, I have a 60amp ChargePoint Home on my wall now it works great but some of the blinks are pathetically slow.
 

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Here are the stations in Phoenix area, Buckeye, Anthem and Tempe Arizona Mills Mall are all operational. Those opened in 2018. 4 new ones under construction, two in Glendale, one in Gilbert and one more planned in Chandler.

1003


For a bigger picture in Arizona, these are opened or under construction, I have used the one in Tucson, as well as all the ones opened in Phoenix:
1004


I actually was the very first customer in Arizona (Buckeye) and have been providing them with many suggestions, including Quartzsite and Kingman requests, as well as changing to KW pricing. They invited me to a webinar on Wednesday that I plan on attending to see what is coming up for Cycle 3. I will post on the forum, what I find out at that webinar.
 

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The 4 new sites in Phoenix that are under construction by EA, the ones in gray, are part of their Cycle 2 "Urban Chargers". These are meant for local usage and consist of 4 150KW units at each site. They seem to have plans for a few L2 chargers at those locations, but from my visits to those sites, they have not actually installed any of those.

The three other existing location in the Phoenix area are part of the Cycle 1 cross country route, I-10 and I-17. Those sites have 150KW and 350KW chargers.

All of the EA chargers support up to 920 Volt systems. The Porsche Taycan is 800V and the new Hummer EV and other GM trucks will charge at 800V. Hyundai has also announced a new 800V platform for electrics. The older 50KW units used by EVGO, EV Connect and Charge Point only support 500 Volts. Those will become obsolete in the future. Either way, all of the DFDCs must be connected to 480 Volts at the utility, whereas the L2 chargers are 240 volt. The largest equipment cost difference is between the L2 and DFDC equipment, not between 50KW versus 150KW DFDCs. Technology is moving quickly and the 50KW chargers will not likely be installed much longer. Even EVGO seems to have settled on newer units being at least 100KW, and they have also started to install a few 350KW units.
 

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I am hoping to see some up in the four corners area, I go to Telluride a couple times a year and really would be helpful to have a level 3 Charger somewhere yo in the four corners as well as in Telluride or Durango. I have submitted sites to them but we will see what comes first the Rivian or the charging.
 

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You can currently get there via Gallup: EA covers Flagstaff, Winslow and Gallup. There is a post on another forum about Colorado adding some chargers in that area. Here is a link to the map:


Pagosa Springs has 125KW Charge Point chargers already, and Bluff Utah has a couple of those as well. Bluff is fairly close to Four Corners, but slightly out of the way to get to Cortez.
 

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Here are the stations in Phoenix area, Buckeye, Anthem and Tempe Arizona Mills Mall are all operational. Those opened in 2018. 4 new ones under construction, two in Glendale, one in Gilbert and one more planned in Chandler.

View attachment 1003

For a bigger picture in Arizona, these are opened or under construction, I have used the one in Tucson, as well as all the ones opened in Phoenix:
View attachment 1004

I actually was the very first customer in Arizona (Buckeye) and have been providing them with many suggestions, including Quartzsite and Kingman requests, as well as changing to KW pricing. They invited me to a webinar on Wednesday that I plan on attending to see what is coming up for Cycle 3. I will post on the forum, what I find out at that webinar.
I'm also invited and expect a bunch of gobbly goop.
 

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The author doesn't seem to be off his rocker. We need to think about charging infrastructure as a hierarchy. In places where your car tends to be parked for 12+ hours, a 7kW Level 2 charger is great (home, hotels). In places where you spend 8+ hours, get a beefier Level 2 charger (~12kW). Places where people might typically spend ~4 hours? A less expensive 25-50kW DC Fast charger is perfect. Places where you may spend 1-2 hours, you probably want a 50-100kW DC Fast charger. And, like the article says, "This is not to say that super-fast charging isn’t desired from time to time. There are times where you have no primary task to do. All other things being equal (which they aren’t) you certainly would like it to be faster. If they got it down under 5 minutes, it would compare with the gas station. There are places, like a lonely truck stop on the interstate, or a delivery fleet depot, where this is good." So they're not arguing against vehicles being capable of 300kW charging, just that a holistic charging infrastructure is going to have a hierarchy of capacities that matches the amount of time you'd expect the vehicle to spend in the parking spot.

The "bigger batteries" are also a very gasoline-oriented way of thinking about things. Electric vehicles are a paradigm shift. They are not a complete drop-in replacement for an ICE vehicle. If you embrace the differences and build a different set of habits, I think most people would be quite happy with the 300+-mile Rivians. But so many people are stuck on bigger batteries, higher numbers, and using the EV in exactly the same manner as they've always used an ICE vehicle -- and resist change. I spent a year and roadtripped 49 US states + 7 Canadian provinces. I was in an ICE vehicle (Sprinter conversion), and I still stopped every 1-2 hours. I have to pee. The dog has to pee. I want to make a coffee, eat a sandwich. I have to pee again (see re: coffee). Here's a cute town I've never heard of, let's go take a look. All those little stops could be great ways to break up the driving, reduce fatigue & increase safety, and keep the battery topped up (if the infrastructure is there).
I get what the author is saying, and there is merit to it. Buy my needs are quite different.

My wife and I live in Orange County. During the winter we typically take 2 weekends a month to go ski at Mammoth. We also take a couple of week long trips there. Typically we take 10-12 trips a year to Mammoth, which is 350 or so miles from our home.

Last year we got a Tesla M3 awd long range. It works well for these trips. On many of our weekend trips we are able to leave on Friday morning, we have our schedules set up to do that every other weekend, so we get out around 4 am. If we can't leave Friday afternoon by around 2 pm we will usually leave Saturday morning around 330 am. When we leave early in the morning we typically hit the chargers when no one is there, which is nice. A trip which took about 5 hours and 50 minutes in an ICE vehicle typically takes about 6 hours and 10 minutes in our model 3. I can deal with an extra 20 minutes, even though it does cut my ski day down a bit, but if charging added an hour and a half to the trip, say it took 7 hours and 15 minutes or so, that would be an issue. That CAN happen if you leave at 2 pm on a Friday and hit a bit of traffic, then have crowded chargers. In those scenarios we will typically eat in Lone Pine and not worry about it, who cares if we arrive in Mammoth at 830 pm or 930? But if we leave at 4 am, i.e. there is no traffic and no crowds at the charger, we need to be able to charge fast. We have accepted that it is simply not as convenient yet as ICE, but for these types of road trips we REALLY need to be able to charge as quickly as we currently do. 50 kw chargers might work at restaurants where people are charging for local driving, but they don't work if you regularly make long road trips. If we took two trips a year to Mammoth, say 5 skiing days, I could say it making sense to have the drive be leisurely and stop and enjoy the town, I can see how that might be enjoyable, but at this point I can take an added half hour or so to the drive and deal with it, but not an hour and a half, unless that was due to a crowded charger.

I have never done the drive in our Tesla leaving at 4 or 5 pm on a Friday, I have no interest in slogging up through LA at that time, but for people in northern LA, i.e. they can leave around 5 or 6 and get to Mammoth around midnight even with Friday afternoon traffic, the charging situation could be a nuisance.

I have friends, ex-ski bums like me who now sit in front of a computer all week, who live in the Bay and hit Tahoe a couple of weekends a month, the way I do with Mammoth. The added range and fast charging has allowed some of them to get Teslas, but that would not have been possible without the fast charging and big battery pack. For people who drive a lot in order to play in the mountains packs need to keep improving and charging needs to keep getting faster.

I realize the point the author is making, and there is certainly something to it. I also realize that my wife and I don't live a typical lifestyle, most people don't take two 700 mile round trip road trips a month in the winter, but for many of us the slow charging and small battery power was what held us back from getting an EV. We need it to be this good, and to hopefully get better. I do realize that it is something of a paradigm shift: Most of us are used to simply getting gas quickly and easily whenever we want it, but adding a half an hour to a six hour trip under ideal charging and driving conditions is acceptable. Adding an hour and a half under those conditions is not.

I love living somewhere where I can ski and surf. I also love living in a place where during the winter I can decide whether I want to ski one of the best mountains in North America, Mammoth, or stay local and surf on weekends. Or, I can stay local and surf in the morning and ski, albeit at mountains which are not as good, in the afternoon. The range and charging has gotten good enough that we have finally gotten an EV, and I have to say that I love that, but it really would be nice for us to see faster charging and a bigger battery pack. Like I said though, I realize we don't lead a typical lifestyle. But I do know quite a few people in coastal California who make 8+ trips a winter to the mountains. Those of us who live this way would like to see charging get faster. I have never charged around 7 pm on a Friday during the winter at the charger in Mojave, but I can imagine it would not be pleasant.
 

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The market doesn't know what it's selling yet, and so the pricing doesn't make any sense. Until EA, nobody but Tesla even understood what they were building. All else being equal, a charge from a more expensive installation should probably cost more money per kWh. Eventually the market will realize this and you'll pay less if you can use less expensive equipment. It sounds like your local chargers have the added confusion of billing based on time, not energy. You wouldn't pay by the minute to use a gas pump, and you shouldn't be asked to do so for charging an EV.

You need some chargers "around town" but mostly for the people who cant charge at home or do long days of driving a work vehicle from site to site. These can largely be slower ones optimized for parking duration. The fastest (and most expensive for the company to purchase and install) should be focused on long distance travel routes beyond towns.
Of course pricing does not make sense, it is such a bargain as compared to the real cost. Here is a slide from the Electrify America webinar this morning:

GoToWebinar 000.png
 
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