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I've had my R1T for almost a month, and I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it. I was just wondering if anyone else was a first time EV owner and gave it up, or if it took a little longer for it to grow on them...?

It's my first EV, and nicest vehicle that I have ever owned. It drives great, no problems at all with it, and it is a lot less expensive to operate than my 2021 4Runner was. The main reason for getting it was for having the convenience of always having a full "tank" every morning. I have only driven more than 200 miles at one time in my 4runner once- a 400 mile trip. Besides local driving, I have to drive about 130 miles round trip once a week. Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous. And the fact that this is a REALLY nice truck. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, considering everything is controlled electronically, through the main screen (including the vents, which I am not a fan of). There's a part of me that just wants a used Tacoma and not have to worry about door dings, scratches, how to valet the thing (I still haven't looked into that!), or gadgets to break.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw out my feelings with it to see if anyone else didn't immediately take to the EV lifestyle, and to get any thoughts on even how to sell it, if I could sell it (and who would get the federal EV credit if I sold it?).

I'm going to give it another month to see what happens. Thanks for any thoughts for a first time EV owner!
 

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If you can charge at home, I think you need to think about how often you’ll want to make those 350 mile trips, and whether taking say 45 minutes to charge while you’re having a bite to eat or take a nap (which you’d probably do anyway) is going to cramp your style.

If you can’t charge at home, then maybe this isn’t the trick for you at the moment.
 

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Usually, when I drive long distances, I want to get there... I'm not a big fan of taking a break; gas, stretch the legs, fast food (maybe to go) and get on the road.

I can charge at home. It's great- every morning I have a 85% charge. Or 100% if I ever plan to be driving a lot over the next couple days. (Why can't there be a 90 or 95% setting?).

I'm just spitballing, here. I don't have any close friends who own an EV so figured I'd see if anyone on here found that owning an EV wasn't what they thought it would be... for better or worse.
 

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If you are concerned about things going wrong any modern ICE vehicle has the same challenges. So much is controlled by software it is crazy.

With regards to charging it is something to get used too. Do you have to stop for 20 minutes, sure if you are hitting the 250mile target but so what. Enjoy the trip, enjoy the drive, see parts of the country you never would have if you were driving 450 miles without a stop.
 

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After my first EV experience years and years ago, I could NEVER go back to an ICE vehicle.

There are charging stations all over the place. For the limited times I have to travel more than 300 miles, yes, it requires more time to stop and charge rather than fill up with gas, but again, that's just once in a very long while as I rarely go over 200 miles in a day. That rare inconvenience is so, so, so easily offset by the all of the many, many, many advantages in every other scenario.

I'd say keep it for 2-3 months. Then, go drive your 4-runner for a couple of weeks and see how you feel. Again, for me, the inconvenience of having to stop for gas on a regular basis locally, remember to constantly service the vehicle every 3,000 miles for oil changes, change the brakes every so often, etc, etc, is a royal pain in the rear.

Not to mention, the incredible acceleration without any effort. The convenience of having a "full tank" every day when I leave, having to do nothing more than take 2 second to plug it in each day, rather than having to stop for gas is so very nice. On an EV, you'll likely never replace the brakes. Requires no oil changes, tune ups. etc, etc.

Sure, repair costs could be higher, but you have a 5 year / 60,000 mile warranty. If you're worried about it in 5 years, then sell it at that time and get the next latest and greatest EV available at that time. One sacrifice of a little extra time to charge on the rare long distance trips versus the daily benefits make it very difficult for most to ever go back to an ICE vehicle. Give it a chance for a couple of months, get used to it. As I said, then try driving your ice for a couple of weeks and see how you like it. You'll probably hate it by then.
 

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Bought my first EV in 2016, doubt I will ever go back to ICE. I also like going point A to point B when traveling, or at least I used to, I do not have any issues at all stoping every couple of hours for 20 to 30 minutes to add juice.

Someone else mentioned as well, how often do you take long trips? A couple a year? You can always rent a vehicle for those few trips.
 

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I've had my R1T for almost a month, and I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it. I was just wondering if anyone else was a first time EV owner and gave it up, or if it took a little longer for it to grow on them...?

It's my first EV, and nicest vehicle that I have ever owned. It drives great, no problems at all with it, and it is a lot less expensive to operate than my 2021 4Runner was. The main reason for getting it was for having the convenience of always having a full "tank" every morning. I have only driven more than 200 miles at one time in my 4runner once- a 400 mile trip. Besides local driving, I have to drive about 130 miles round trip once a week. Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous. And the fact that this is a REALLY nice truck. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, considering everything is controlled electronically, through the main screen (including the vents, which I am not a fan of). There's a part of me that just wants a used Tacoma and not have to worry about door dings, scratches, how to valet the thing (I still haven't looked into that!), or gadgets to break.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw out my feelings with it to see if anyone else didn't immediately take to the EV lifestyle, and to get any thoughts on even how to sell it, if I could sell it (and who would get the federal EV credit if I sold it?).

I'm going to give it another month to see what happens. Thanks for any thoughts for a first time EV owner!
I think you are missing a central point and that is that the R1T is an EV and does not pump crap into the air you breath. A little inconvenience for charging time should be easy to justify and plan for.

I absolutely enjoy my R1T but the thing I like the most is driving past gas stations.

Just a small change in attitude from financial/me to a bigger picture taking into account the impact of our choices on others and on the future would result in seeing the full value of the R1T.

I will never purchase another ICE.

100 years of big oil/ICEs has conditioned us to the point of accepting it to the exclusion of logic, common sense to being outright stupid.
 

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I've had my R1T for almost a month, and I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it. I was just wondering if anyone else was a first time EV owner and gave it up, or if it took a little longer for it to grow on them...?

It's my first EV, and nicest vehicle that I have ever owned. It drives great, no problems at all with it, and it is a lot less expensive to operate than my 2021 4Runner was. The main reason for getting it was for having the convenience of always having a full "tank" every morning. I have only driven more than 200 miles at one time in my 4runner once- a 400 mile trip. Besides local driving, I have to drive about 130 miles round trip once a week. Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous. And the fact that this is a REALLY nice truck. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, considering everything is controlled electronically, through the main screen (including the vents, which I am not a fan of). There's a part of me that just wants a used Tacoma and not have to worry about door dings, scratches, how to valet the thing (I still haven't looked into that!), or gadgets to break.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw out my feelings with it to see if anyone else didn't immediately take to the EV lifestyle, and to get any thoughts on even how to sell it, if I could sell it (and who would get the federal EV credit if I sold it?).

I'm going to give it another month to see what happens. Thanks for any thoughts for a first time EV owner!

Totally get how you feel. It’s new and a bit unknown and scary.

I’ve had a Tesla for 10years (Dec 2012) and would never go back.

These vehicles have WAY less issues than gasoline vehicles. After a few early issues Tesla fixed for me (this rivian is new as well and it will happen) I’ve rarely had to take it in. No oil changes, no brakes, nothing. The last time I saw Tesla was to replace my tires TPMS sensors!

The waiting to charge is an issue. But how often will you really have the issue with such a large battery.
And when and if you DO have to stop you don’t charge to full. EVs charge very quickly when empty, it’s the topping off that takes a long time. I do a run often in my Tesla and stop at a gas station to bathroom and grab a coffee. In the 5-10 I charge 80 miles.
And if you really want to pull that all night driver then just rent a car for the rare time that may happen. I went to Yosemite once and did this. Kids ate in the rental instead of my car anyway.

I can truly say that after a little time you won’t care about the charging issue.

In my mind the pros way outweigh the cons. I agree with the guy who said to keep the car for a few months and make the decision.

I was feeling the same as you 10 years ago when I got my Model S. It was expensive, new and unproven, and took some getting used to. I truly think it’s worth the learning curve.

Listen when so many of us are saying we’d never go back to an ICE now.

Enjoy your truck 🛻 👍
 

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If you are concerned about things going wrong any modern ICE vehicle has the same challenges. So much is controlled by software it is crazy.
This drives me crazy in all new vehicles. I want real physical buttons and a super simple display. But I have to accept that cars are advancing incredible fast in many ways that I do like, and the over the top touch screen comes for the ride.
 

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I've had my R1T for almost a month, and I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it. I was just wondering if anyone else was a first time EV owner and gave it up, or if it took a little longer for it to grow on them...?

It's my first EV, and nicest vehicle that I have ever owned. It drives great, no problems at all with it, and it is a lot less expensive to operate than my 2021 4Runner was. The main reason for getting it was for having the convenience of always having a full "tank" every morning. I have only driven more than 200 miles at one time in my 4runner once- a 400 mile trip. Besides local driving, I have to drive about 130 miles round trip once a week. Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous. And the fact that this is a REALLY nice truck. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, considering everything is controlled electronically, through the main screen (including the vents, which I am not a fan of). There's a part of me that just wants a used Tacoma and not have to worry about door dings, scratches, how to valet the thing (I still haven't looked into that!), or gadgets to break.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw out my feelings with it to see if anyone else didn't immediately take to the EV lifestyle, and to get any thoughts on even how to sell it, if I could sell it (and who would get the federal EV credit if I sold it?).

I'm going to give it another month to see what happens. Thanks for any thoughts for a first time EV owner!
The 5 min pumping gas is typically closer to 15-20 minutes. We’re just so used to it and conditioned that it seems much shorter.

The same type of thing happens when charging on the road. It took a good 2 years of EV only ownership before I stopped thinking about it. It’s just something you do.

It’s a bit like saying you’re worried about your cell phone battery life, so a corded phone is better for you. For a while it was very relevant. Some days, you still run out of batteries. But the act of plugging it in to charge is just something you do now. Sometimes it’s at home, sometimes it’s at your office, etc
 

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This drives me crazy in all new vehicles. I want real physical buttons and a super simple display. But I have to accept that cars are advancing incredible fast in many ways that I do like, and the over the top touch screen comes for the ride.
My Audi A7 has very few buttons, but after a few weeks it is amazing, never really caused me any more headache than a traditional dash system. Same goes for my other cars.

I remember when my 1998 Passat has a crank shaft sensor issue after 3 weeks, vehicle refused to start and the shop took 2 weeks to figure it out. Once the sensor was replaced it was a great vehicle for 3 years.
 

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To my mind it's pretty simple. The planet is burning and most of us have kids. The faster we adopt these superior cars and all of the other superior, non-carbon emitting, electric energy technologies, the less charring the planet will experience. A radically changed planet is still coming, but we can reduce the damage. Everyone's comments are spot on - it just takes a change in mindset. You'll feel younger and experience more for it.

Cheers. It's great you bought the truck in the first place.
 

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To my mind it's pretty simple. The planet is burning and most of us have kids. The faster we adopt these superior cars and all of the other superior, non-carbon emitting, electric energy technologies, the less charring the planet will experience. A radically changed planet is still coming, but we can reduce the damage. Everyone's comments are spot on - it just takes a change in mindset. You'll feel younger and experience more for it.

Cheers. It's great you bought the truck in the first place.
I'm with you on that. We've (collectively) pushed ourselves into a corner. Getting out of the corner is uncomfortable (price-wise). People don't want to pay the cost collectively, so that's why we see policies forcing it onto us. I don't see the alternative as better, since it involves even worse changes to the world that will be even harder to cope with and more costly, just the cost will come later instead of now.

Hopefully more and more work from home will help, the big city norms of 1+ hour commutes each way is a huge problem as well.
 

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I’m in Alaska. We got our first super charger in the state this summer. I’ve had 2 teslas over 8 years (S then 3). You have legitimate concerns over charging on the road and currently the non-tesla charging network is pathetic. I’ve driven much of the road system without SC, for me >400 miles in my Model 3 sucks. It can be done and it isn’t as bad as you would think.

that said I probably will not buy another ICE, well unless It is a “toy”, I’m considering another 911 GT3 or doing aWRX Sti for ice (as in frozen lakes) racing

that also said I wouldn’t own an EV as my only vehicle, but I drive the Tesla at least 75% of the time. When I do get an EV truck (less likely a Rivian every day) I will keep my 200 series Land cruiser for long trips, off roading, and towing.
 

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To my mind it's pretty simple. The planet is burning and most of us have kids. The faster we adopt these superior cars and all of the other superior, non-carbon emitting, electric energy technologies, the less charring the planet will experience. A radically changed planet is still coming, but we can reduce the damage. Everyone's comments are spot on - it just takes a change in mindset. You'll feel younger and experience more for it.

Cheers. It's great you bought the truck in the first place.
I agree.

From a local standpoint we are immersed in ICE exhaust. ICE exhaust is all around us day in and day out. There are thousands of mini super fund sites everywhere (leaking gas storage tanks at gas stations).

Just suppose EVs were the norm. Totally built out infrastructure and the new thing were ICEs. Would you choose an ICE that emits toxic gases and particles, that you have to fill a gas tank with toxic/explosive/flammable chemicals, that requires thousands of gasoline tanker trucks to haul it everywhere, the list goes on and on.

Because ICE exhaust is mostly colorless and odorless we don’t give it a second thought but if we added a pungent odor like we do for detecting LNG then we would pay attention.

ICE exhaust is global but it foremost and primarily is local even right into our garages. We are immersed in it!!!

I think it is time we stop being sheep and make a few sacrifices and pay up.
 

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Hey @DustyBottoms, the R1T is my first EV as well. Like you, I don't do very many drives over 200 miles. Honestly, I feel the same way you do about the prospect of charging on the road on a longer trip. I think it's because I have never used a charger other than the one at my house. Before I go on my first road trip with the R1T I'm going to use some of the local area chargers, even though I don't have to, just to get familiar with them. I, too, like to get where I'm going. But, a 20-30 minute stop is a small price to pay for driving the R1T. I drove my 2011 Tacoma the other day, after driving the R1T for a few months, and couldn't believe how loud, rough, and gutless it was.

Like others have said, keep the R1T for a while. Try out some chargers in your area, before a road trip, to get comfortable with them. And, if all else fails, I'll let you drive my Tacoma to solidify your confidence in your R1T.
 

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....Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous...
There is something to be said for being able to drive a long distance without stopping for anything. Its just that how often do you do that?

Also your nervousness is definitely related to being new to EV and have not experienced long trips. That said....

Usually, when I drive long distances, I want to get there... I'm not a big fan of taking a break; gas, stretch the legs, fast food (maybe to go) and get on the road...
Your trip habits will require rethinking. Plan your charging around lunch/dinner, estimate total elapsed time including charging stops versus just driving faster.

Economically, EVs are significantly lower cost to own. There are financial benefit. This is the ONLY reason why I own an EV (Tesla) and will add Rivian as my second EV. For all those that use Carbon footprint as a reason to own EVs, its naive to believe just because one switches from ICE to EV, they are helping to reduce global warming.

The global CO2 emission in 2020 by sector shown here:

Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel


The maroon color is the power industry and the top green is ALL transportation where cars and trucks represent 41% of ONLY transportation share. The thing is most EV power comes from non-renewable sources since it comes from local utility of wherever chargers are located. Clearly, some states in US have better renewable. sources but how about the rest of the world? China, India, Russia, Africa?

In other words, ICE to EV is just a drop in a bucket. Yes if enough drops collect, there will be a noticeable amount in the bucket but when? USA contribute to 15% of the total CO2 output, of which cars and trucks contributes 16.4% or less than 2.5% of the global output.

So go ahead, if you don't think you can shift your mindset in a month, then, by all means sell. Sooner you sell your Rivian, more likely that you'll sell for a higher value. Take the profit and go get your Tacoma or Coronado or whatever ICE truck you'd like. Maybe in 5 years, you can revisit the EV option again. By then Rivian will have R2 series and so many other choices of EVs with longer range than now. Most importantly, the country will have a better charging infrastructure by then... hopefully.
 

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There is something to be said for being able to drive a long distance without stopping for anything. Its just that how often do you do that?

Also your nervousness is definitely related to being new to EV and have not experienced long trips. That said....



Your trip habits will require rethinking. Plan your charging around lunch/dinner, estimate total elapsed time including charging stops versus just driving faster.

Economically, EVs are significantly lower cost to own. There are financial benefit. This is the ONLY reason why I own an EV (Tesla) and will add Rivian as my second EV. For all those that use Carbon footprint as a reason to own EVs, its naive to believe just because one switches from ICE to EV, they are helping to reduce global warming.

The global CO2 emission in 2020 by sector shown here:

View attachment 8090

The maroon color is the power industry and the top green is ALL transportation where cars and trucks represent 41% of ONLY transportation share. The thing is most EV power comes from non-renewable sources since it comes from local utility of wherever chargers are located. Clearly, some states in US have better renewable. sources but how about the rest of the world? China, India, Russia, Africa?

In other words, ICE to EV is just a drop in a bucket. Yes if enough drops collect, there will be a noticeable amount in the bucket but when? USA contribute to 15% of the total CO2 output, of which cars and trucks contributes 16.4% or less than 2.5% of the global output.

So go ahead, if you don't think you can shift your mindset in a month, then, by all means sell. Sooner you sell your Rivian, more likely that you'll sell for a higher value. Take the profit and go get your Tacoma or Coronado or whatever ICE truck you'd like. Maybe in 5 years, you can revisit the EV option again. By then Rivian will have R2 series and so many other choices of EVs with longer range than now. Most importantly, the country will have a better charging infrastructure by then... hopefully.
ICE exhaust not just about global warming and one needs to fully understand biases behind charts and graphs confirming data veracity.

We currently breath in fresh ICE concentrated exhaust every day. If you believe the data there are health issues linked directly to ICE exhaust.

EVs are not the perfect solution by a long shot but is a step in the right direction a big step in the direction of renewable energy.

Why keep pissing in the air we locally breathe?
 

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If you are charging at home and not road tripping very often you will probably find that the time you save by not going to a gas station once a week (or however often you do) more than offsets the additional time on infrequent road trips. I find that charging during a road trip isn't a big deal but I always combine bathroom/coffee buying with charging and in that 10-15 minutes the car is usually already charged enough or close enough to move on. Also if you are driving 360 miles a day and averaging 60 mph (numbers chosen for easier math) you will spend 6 hours driving and, provided charging works as designed or close to it, you will need to charge for 15-30 minutes provided you have a place to plug into on arrival and don't mind driving down to around 10% battery. Is an extra 15-30 minutes charging really a big deal on a 6 hour drive? I take 350 mile trips or so every few months in a older Model S 70D which is a much slower charger than an R1T and has a much lower range, it isn't a problem for me. All that being said, if it doesn't work for you it doesn't work for you but I would never go back to ICE, I don't miss oil changes, coolant changes, replacing brakes, transmission fluid change, etc.
 

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For all of you concerned with your carbon footprint and emissions. The best first thing to do is switch to bike commuting. I bike commute to the hospital as well as grocery store a good 80% of the time year-round in Alaska. I know five or six people that bike commute almost 100% of the time that have more than a 30 mile commute, here in Alaska. With pedal assisted ebikes it’s even more realistic as you can cruise along at 20 to 25 mph without breaking a sweat. Other important thing to consider is don’t ever get on an airplane again, don’t buy new clothes, and don’t own a dog.
 
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