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ot having to go get gas at all is a huge benefit of owning an EV and I'm looking forward to that. But saying that you can charge it as quickly as you can fill your tank because you include the time waiting in a gas line at Costco in the comparison is just a total fudge of facts and figures. How long is the wait time at a
100% agree. The primary fueling advantage that EV's have over ICE vehicles is the realistic ability to leave the garage full in the morning, each and every morning. Any assertion that refueling an EV (e.g., from 0 to say 80%) is remotely close to the amount of time spent fueling an ICE (0 to 80%) is completely untrue in 2022.

What IS true, is that with an ICE, most people only have the ability fuel "on the road". And those EV owners, who also own their homes, have a realistic opportunity to not spend any time standing around waiting for daily fueling (because it can happen for them overnight in their garages, if the get L2 charging installed). So, for the most common use case, keeping an EV fueled can be easier and faster.

But, when one is forced to refuel on the road rapidly ... there is no comparison between EV and ICE vehicles. ICE vehicles win that "race" every time. And I believe they will continue to do so for the far foreseeable future.

But the question one should ask themselves is: how much does that fact negatively impact you on a routine basis? Sometimes, those unfamiliar with EV ownership fail to initially wrap their heads around the idea that keeping your EV fueled (for normal daily driving) is something you really don't have to think about, or wait for, at all. It is only when you drive in excess of the your vehicle's range in a single day that it is a consideration really at all. Some people may do that frequently, and they should definitely consider carefully the infrastructure around them they have available for charging. But for a non-trivial amount of others, if you are leaving the garage full every morning, then it may end up being an infrequent enough concern to not weigh heavily upon you.
 

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100% agree. The primary fueling advantage that EV's have over ICE vehicles is the realistic ability to leave the garage full in the morning, each and every morning. Any assertion that refueling an EV (e.g., from 0 to say 80%) is remotely close to the amount of time spent fueling an ICE (0 to 80%) is completely untrue in 2022.

What IS true, is that with an ICE, most people only have the ability fuel "on the road". And those EV owners, who also own their homes, have a realistic opportunity to not spend any time standing around waiting for daily fueling (because it can happen for them overnight in their garages, if the get L2 charging installed). So, for the most common use case, keeping an EV fueled can be easier and faster.

But, when one is forced to refuel on the road rapidly ... there is no comparison between EV and ICE vehicles. ICE vehicles win that "race" every time. And I believe they will continue to do so for the far foreseeable future.

But the question one should ask themselves is: how much does that fact negatively impact you on a routine basis? Sometimes, those unfamiliar with EV ownership fail to initially wrap their heads around the idea that keeping your EV fueled (for normal daily driving) is something you really don't have to think about, or wait for, at all. It is only when you drive in excess of the your vehicle's range in a single day that it is a consideration really at all. Some people may do that frequently, and they should definitely consider carefully the infrastructure around them they have available for charging. But for a non-trivial amount of others, if you are leaving the garage full every morning, then it may end up being an infrequent enough concern to not weigh heavily upon you.
Agreed. I just don't like when enthusiastic EV folks get wonky on the facts. Everything has pros and cons.

We have several other ICE vehicles and won't (if ever) go 100% EV until I find one that can completely replace the functionality. We take a lot of road trips and I don't even like stopping for gas, much less sitting around waiting for a charge.
 

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Agreed. I just don't like when enthusiastic EV folks get wonky on the facts. Everything has pros and cons.

We have several other ICE vehicles and won't (if ever) go 100% EV until I find one that can completely replace the functionality. We take a lot of road trips and I don't even like stopping for gas, much less sitting around waiting for a charge.
I understand and completely agree with you. And nor should you like it when that happens: it is misinformation, and doesn't ultimately help with increasing adoption.

There are lots of things to be enthusiastic about with EV's ... but a direct replace/improvement over all aspects of ICE vehicle ownership is an exaggeration. And, for me, it's an unnecessary one at that. Because even with the "downsides", there is a lot to love about EV's. Who says it has to be a 100% compromise-free proposition? I tend to think that EV's provide us all an opportunity to reconsider what we presume to be important about the functionalities / use-cases best addressed by the vehicle. Sometimes, it is as "easy" as that: going through that "mental reset".

Of course, there certainly will be a percentage of people who really really just need to be able to drive 100's and 100's of miles at a time... and do so as efficiently as possible (i.e., time). Those folks are not as great a fit for the EV ecosystem of 2022, because it simply does not address that as a top priority (i.e., refueling on the go as fast as possible), yet.
 

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Consider this. You mention driving on a trip at 400 miles a couple of times each year. Your last pickup took a 10 minute refill every week or so, and this truck fills at home for practically nothing, unless you have high priced electricity. This truck takes a 30 minute fill every couple of months when on a really long trip. Much less time filling your truck each year!

And if you are visiting friends who have a electric dryer that you can plug into and run a low cost 24 amp charger, your truck can be full after a day or less. Aliexpress you can buy a 32 amp charger that is adjustable to 24, 16 and less amps to avoid tripping a circuit breaker. Search 32A EV charger, and they have several companies that can send one for about $220 including shipping.

I installed a 50 amp RV type plug on my charger, that can plug into a stove receptacle, and then have a adapter that is a dryer cord with a surface mount 50 amp stove receptacle on the other end.
 

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I've had my R1T for almost a month, and I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it. I was just wondering if anyone else was a first time EV owner and gave it up, or if it took a little longer for it to grow on them...?

It's my first EV, and nicest vehicle that I have ever owned. It drives great, no problems at all with it, and it is a lot less expensive to operate than my 2021 4Runner was. The main reason for getting it was for having the convenience of always having a full "tank" every morning. I have only driven more than 200 miles at one time in my 4runner once- a 400 mile trip. Besides local driving, I have to drive about 130 miles round trip once a week. Considering my driving habits, the Rivian seemed very practical for me. I wanted to get a truck, and was thinking about trading my 4runner for a Tacoma or Colorado when I got the call for my R1T delivery date about a year before I was expecting it. I was hesitant to take delivery, but I pulled the trigger.

The main sticking point for me is if I will ever need to charge it on the road- No more pulling over and spending 5 minutes pumping gas for another 350 miles. That makes me nervous. And the fact that this is a REALLY nice truck. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, considering everything is controlled electronically, through the main screen (including the vents, which I am not a fan of). There's a part of me that just wants a used Tacoma and not have to worry about door dings, scratches, how to valet the thing (I still haven't looked into that!), or gadgets to break.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw out my feelings with it to see if anyone else didn't immediately take to the EV lifestyle, and to get any thoughts on even how to sell it, if I could sell it (and who would get the federal EV credit if I sold it?).

I'm going to give it another month to see what happens. Thanks for any thoughts for a first time EV owner!
Don't be scared. If you sell the R1T, you'll regret it. Let it grow on you, and it will grow on you. I come from diesel truck ownership, 4 trucks in a row, so I get it. Towing a 31' toyhauler to Glamis and a boat to Havasu for over 20 years. I sold the toys, and dont need to tow right now. A motorhome is in my future now. I've had my R1T since 3/31/22 with 5k miles already and really love it. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I am 1 week in and loving my R1T. Buying it feels like the best financial decision I've made in a long time, especially since I locked in the price over a year ago. Then there's the pure joy of driving it...

However, I can understand OP's uncertainty about whether to keep it. Is it worth it to keep if I can sell it and make $20k more than I bought it for?

From my limited experience so far--
Reasons to Keep the R1T:
1. It is awesome
2. It truly is superior to every ICE truck out there from a sheer mechanical engineering and technology standpoint. I have no worries about long-term reliability and maintenance costs, simply because there is a whole lot less stuff to break. It does everything that an ICE vehicle does, and yet it does it better, instantly, and with thousands of less moving parts. And I also agree with all the people who point out that all ICE vehicles nowadays are just as dependent on computers and chips and electronic controls that can be finicky no matter what is powering the car.
3. Agree with those people saying that we're doing our miniscule part to reduce CO2 emissions. Also agree with people saying that the impact of these LEISURE trucks (definitely not work trucks) will be so small that it is essentially 0, but it at least is not pushing things further in the wrong direction.
4. Charging is free for me. I live in a town where the municipal buildings have public chargers that are free to use (at least for now) and they are walking distance from my apartment building.
5. Not worried about 400 mile trips because I have 2 kids who will go crazy if we don't stop to eat, potty, and let them run around for a little bit, and this takes at least 20 minutes every 2-3 hours, so adding another 20 minutes onto that doesn't sound so bad.
6. It is just so awesome...

Reasons to consider selling:
1. While my daily/weekly charging is free, I am pretty much dependent on these public chargers because I don't have my own home that I can install a charger in/outside. EV adoption is now reaching exponential growth, so these chargers will be unavailable more and more often. That will probably get old. At the same time, I am told that my apartment building is installing chargers, but who knows how soon that will happen (i.e. when will they get through all the red tape and bureaucracy for the state or federal government to subsidize these charger installations?).
2. I totally agree with OP being afraid of getting the slightest dent or scratch on this beautiful work of art. This is my first (and maybe my last) luxury vehicle, and I don't know how people can handle it. I never worried about needing to protect any car before this. I took care of them, but if they got a dent or a scratch on the door, whatevs. Now it's like, "Hmm, let me repark like 5 spots away from the furthest spot where I think that a human being would even consider parking to use this grocery store..."
3. I HATE how I have to use my phone as a key. Isn't anyone else shocked at how long it takes to unlock the car with the fob? It's actually slower than using a physical key! Who would have signed off on copying the worst page from Tesla's playbook???
4. While it is convenient (and awesome) to own a truck, I don't truly need one. I could go back to owning a very decent ICE SUV that fits my family's needs for just a tiny bit more than what I would make from selling the R1T...
 

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DustyBottoms:

Cancel the R1T and go with your gut. Buy an ICE that you like and be content. You are obviously not ready for an EV, they are not for everyone.

Posting this thread clearly indicates that you are looking for others to help you make a decision which means you already know the answer. Cancel and move on.
 
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