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Does anyone have any information regarding Rivian’s charging infrastructure Plan? Will they have the infrastructure in place by the time vehicles are delivered?
 

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Hiya!
Just joined.
Does anyone know what charge plug the Rivian plans to use? Will they make a "wall" charger like Tesla does, for home charging?

Thanks,

GEON
 

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Level 2 will be a a SAE J1772 and DC will be CCS. Both standard. Many chargers out there that will work just as Tesla does. Rivian may have on to buy. This site is a start to learn the specifics. Lots of info out there.
 

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Level 2 will be a a SAE J1772 and DC will be CCS. Both standard. Many chargers out there that will work just as Tesla does. Rivian may have on to buy. This site is a start to learn the specifics. Lots of info out there.
Will they increase the level 2 spec to handle faster charging? Tesla's previous generation chargers could support up to a 100 amp breaker, the newer wall chargers are less now. But from what I can tell the max a level 2 charger can handle is a 40 amp breaker - that means 32 amps = 7680watts. With a 180kwh battery - could be more than just overnight to charge (at home...)...
Did I get this right?

GEON
 

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Rivian R1T and R1S will have a 11.5 kw onboard charger. At 240 volts the most it will draw is 48 amps (11500 w / 240 v) which requires a 60 amp breaker and the EVSE hard-wired vs plugged in (e.g. into a NEMA 14-50R). It's my understanding that anything bigger than a 60 amp breaker is not necessary unless you're looking to future proof your set up, say, for a future EV with a more powerful onboard charger and/or a second EV you'll be charging. BTW, Wattzilla brand makes EVSEs from 40 to 80 amps.

So far Rivian has given no indication they will go with a more powerful onboard charger at least with the introductory models.

With a 180kwh battery - could be more than just overnight to charge (at home...)
I would think that would only be an issue if you go from 0 to 100% SOC, which is not recommended on a regular basis. I've seen (in general, not Rivian) a recommended SOC range is 10 or 20% to 85 or 90% to prolong battery life. So that's about 70% of the 180 kWh BP = 126 kWh. Dividing that by 11.5 kW would take just under 11 hrs to charge, but that doesn't account for any factors like taper. Not known at this point if Rivian will taper the charge as the BP reaches higher % of SOC, but I suspect they will, meaning the tail-end of charging may take a little longer to charge.
 

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Rivian R1T and R1S will have a 11.5 kw onboard charger. At 240 volts the most it will draw is 48 amps (11500 w / 240 v) which requires a 60 amp breaker and the EVSE hard-wired vs plugged in (e.g. into a NEMA 14-50R). It's my understanding that anything bigger than a 60 amp breaker is not necessary unless you're looking to future proof your set up, say, for a future EV with a more powerful onboard charger and/or a second EV you'll be charging. BTW, Wattzilla brand makes EVSEs from 40 to 80 amps.

So far Rivian has given no indication they will go with a more powerful onboard charger at least with the introductory models.



I would think that would only be an issue if you go from 0 to 100% SOC, which is not recommended on a regular basis. I've seen (in general, not Rivian) a recommended SOC range is 10 or 20% to 85 or 90% to prolong battery life. So that's about 70% of the 180 kWh BP = 126 kWh. Dividing that by 11.5 kW would take just under 11 hrs to charge, but that doesn't account for any factors like taper. Not known at this point if Rivian will taper the charge as the BP reaches higher % of SOC, but I suspect they will, meaning the tail-end of charging may take a little longer to charge.
Yes, OK, I put a 60 amp breaker on my current charger. (Tesla) I haven't seen any of the current non-tesla chargers go beyond 40 amps...

Good point on the SOC, 11 hours is double what I am doing now - but the capacity is double too!

Thanks for your help.

GEON
 

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Rivian is supposedly going to 11kw for level 2 charging which would require a 60 Amp box and must be hard wired. Check juice box.

Awesome - thank you - I hadn't seen any of the chargers that would be able to provide full-charging amps...

GEON
 

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Yes, OK, I put a 60 amp breaker on my current charger. (Tesla) I haven't seen any of the current non-tesla chargers go beyond 40 amps...

Good point on the SOC, 11 hours is double what I am doing now - but the capacity is double too!

Thanks for your help.

GEON
Just so you are clear the charging station is not a charger unless you are DC fast charging. Level 1 and level 2 chargers are built into every EV car or truck. The cord you attach is an EVSE short for electric vehicle service equipment. Basically a smart cord that checks for faults and proper electricity before allowing current to flow. With the ability to make the live end dead so there is no chance of an arc or anyone touching a live circuit. I hope you find this info informative.
 

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Just so you are clear the charging station is not a charger unless you are DC fast charging. Level 1 and level 2 chargers are built into every EV car or truck. The cord you attach is an EVSE short for electric vehicle service equipment. Basically a smart cord that checks for faults and proper electricity before allowing current to flow. With the ability to make the live end dead so there is no chance of an arc or anyone touching a live circuit. I hope you find this info informative.
Appreciate the correction, but who cares? This what powers the charging of my vehicle. My point was that the Tesla unit can have a variety of breakers in it and participates with the charging amperage flow.
 

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I would acquire an R1S and use it to tow a trailer for long distance trips. I will expect to stop to charge about every 200 miles even with the 180 kWh battery pack.
Does anyone know how this will work at charging stations with a trailer attached? Will there be drive through charging stations that will accommodate a trailer? Might not be easy if a 40’ trailer had to be disconnected for each charge!
 

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I would acquire an R1S and use it to tow a trailer for long distance trips. I will expect to stop to charge about every 200 miles even with the 180 kWh battery pack.
Does anyone know how this will work at charging stations with a trailer attached? Will there be drive through charging stations that will accommodate a trailer? Might not be easy if a 40’ trailer had to be disconnected for each charge!
The charging port is at the front so the trailer should be able to remain connected. In some urban areas, the size of the parking area may be the limiting factor.

893
 

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Hiya!
Just joined.
Does anyone know what charge plug the Rivian plans to use? Will they make a "wall" charger like Tesla does, for home charging?

Thanks,

GEON
Complete newbie here to EVs. Read all the replies here and have no idea what you're talking about. What do I need at home to charge this vehicle. Pretend you are explaining it to a 10yr old. I have never owned an EV. Don't know what I need, where to get it, or who I need to have install it, or if the electric panel on my home is even sufficient.
 

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This may help, this will be my first EV too, so I've been trying to read as much as I can. That home charger he is talking about would be the EVSE, mostly added for safety. Keep in mind that Rivian will have an on board charger of ~11KW, so you'll probably a wire that can handle >50A to take advantage of its charging capabilities.

EV charging terms
Before we get into detail about different aspects of charging, let’s define some of the key terms:

On-board charger
The actual charging device for Level 1 and Level 2 charging comes factory-installed and is called the “on-board charger.” It converts AC power from the wall to DC power that charges the battery in the vehicle. The charging speed may vary, but the most common on-board chargers are 6.6 kW on battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and 3.3kW on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). DC Fast Charging uses its own off-board Charger.

EVSE
Stands for “electric vehicle service equipment.” It is the intermediary between a power source and the vehicle’s charging port, and is typically mounted on a wall or up on a pedestal. Its role is to simply relay the AC power to the vehicle safely.
While installing an EVSE result in additional cost to the consumer (versus just plugging into any 240 volt socket), their are benefits besides just safety. Adjusting the vehicle's on-board charger to make sure it doesn't exceed the power limits of the circuit it is plugged into is no longer required with EVSE. This is an important simplification to the charging process, and should help facilitate adoption of EVs in the future for people who could care less what current, voltage or wattage are.

Level 1 charging
The slowest form of charging. Almost all electric cars come with a cable that connects to the vehicle’s on-board charger and a standard household (120v) outlet. This setup provides between 2 and 5 miles per hour. While this does not sound at all impressive, it can work for vehicles that travel less than 40 miles a day and have all night to charge.

Level 2 charging
Provides power at 200-240v, through either an EVSE that has a plug that connects into your car, or via a 240v outlet (similar to the ones your oven or dryer uses) that requires a cable / adapter. Level 2 chargers can be up to 80amps, and drivers can add 10-65 miles of range in an hour of charging.

DC Fast charging
In this case, the charger is a gas pump-sized machine. There is no single standard for fast-charging – Tesla has the Supercharger network; Nissan Leaf, Kia and Mitsubishi get their quickest jolt using CHAdeMO, and Chevy Bolt, BMW, Volkswagen among others use SAE Combo (combined charging system or CCS). Rivian will also use CCS for their standard plug.
 

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@Babbuino Great post, thanks.

@barkway Before the Rivian arrives at your house, you can get the charging station installed. Buy one of the reputable ones, like this JuiceBox (linked), call your local electrician, and tell him you want to install a charging station. Your electrician will sort out whatever needs to be done at your home. Electricians everywhere have been installing these for years now and will know what to do.

That's all there is to it. Your home will now be ready to charge the Rivian or any other EV you buy.
 

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@Babbuino Great post, thanks.

@barkway Before the Rivian arrives at your house, you can get the charging station installed. Buy one of the reputable ones, like this JuiceBox (linked), call your local electrician, and tell him you want to install a charging station. Your electrician will sort out whatever needs to be done at your home. Electricians everywhere have been installing these for years now and will know what to do.

That's all there is to it. Your home will now be ready to charge the Rivian or any other EV you buy.
BTW, I wonder if they'll provide that service...
 

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BTW, I wonder if they'll provide that service...
Seems to me that offering rebranded chargers + partnering with an installation provider would be both 1) a profit center for Rivian and 2) a way for Rivian to ensure customers are receiving consistent experiences getting their homes setup, which can be confusing for many people
 
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