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Re: "Pirelli's crappy warranty"

Pirelli has a good warranty, just like all other major tire manufacturers. And just like all other major tire manufacturers that I know of, the tires that come with your new vehicle are not covered by the tire manufacturer's warranty. That's been true of every car I've ever purchased.

That's solely because they came with the car. From Pirelli's warranty page linked above:


If you buy that same set of 4 Pirelli Rivian tires from a tire dealer and have them installed, those 4 replacement tires ARE covered by the warranty. 50,000 miles in this case. There have been many posts from many EV owners (including Rivian owners) who have had no problems getting a warranty credit for Pirelli tires if they wear out in less than 50k miles - again with the caveat that we're not talking about the tires that came with the car, but with tires purchased from an authorized Pirelli dealer as replacements. Pirellis are used on many EVs, and many other performance vehicles, and they honor their warranty.
Sell your tires right away and get new ones.
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh)

It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered...

So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's?

Any suggestions?
Do you drive mostly in conserve mode? If so, switching to all purpose, will make a difference. Propelling a 6000 pound vehicle around by its front wheels only in addition to most of the braking and all of the steering will wear the front wheels down. But I agree that they won’t last 50k in any case.

I had a brand new Honda Odyssey that only gave 12,000 miles out of it’s original tires…
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh)

It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered...

So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's?

Any suggestions?
Rivian Tires are becoming a deal breaker. Why any company would redesign an entirely new tire size is inexcusable. Sorry but may just have to dump the R1t and take delivery on the Bronco Badlands. Really a shame.
It’s a 800hp >7000 lb truck. It will eat tires no matter what. If you really want longer tire life could go to a 10 ply LT but the trade off is ride quality will go to crap. When my wife had a cayenne turbo she went through her first set of tires before the first oil change…. We had it for 3 years and put 3 sets of tires on it.
Very poor engineering. could have gone with a standard XL truck tire ie Ford F350 6 bolt... but messed up with an orphan design. Truly a Real deal breaker (along with the dysfunctional Navigation) and #1 reason to sell the other wise nice truck.
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh)

It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered...

So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's?

Any suggestions?
I have 13,500 miles on my R1T. At 2000 miles the steering rack came loose and I had a ‘broken sub frame” on the right front. Both were covered under warrantee requiring shipping of the vehicle and 10 days absence. At 10,500 miles I installed snow tires and was told at the tire shop that they could not remount the right front tire in the spring, as it is worn to 4/32s. Left front is 6/32s, rears are 9/32S. At delivery my question on maintenance was meet with “nothing but replace the tires when there wear out”.

Rivian’s response to my asymmetric tire wear has been that I “missed The recommended tire rotation that was to be done at 5000 miles,” even though their own service center recommends 9000 miles, and I was not told this when I ask about maintenance at delivery. The Bellvue Service center’s position is that this is “normal wear”. If both front tires were worn to 4/32s I could accept this. The facts that the wear was asymmetric (right front) and that the wear on my Blizzacks after 3000 miles is symmetric, and that I had a broken subframe at 2000 miles on the same corner, makes their conclusion that this is “normal wear” illogical. I refuse to accept this illogical conclusion.

I have been working with Rivain since November. They cycle service advisers to communicate with me, very few who follow through on promises to return calls. I have suggested I be allowed to purchase a new set of tires and wheels (I need a set of wheels for my snow tires) and that they credit me for the one bad tire. I could then cycle the 3 tires I have into a rotation and avoid throwing them into the landfill.

The Rivian approach has been to wear me out, in the hope I will just go away. I need a logical explanation for my asymmetric tire wear. If I don’t get a logical explaination- I am like a sticky booger….they can shake all they want, but I’ll still be here.

It’s been over 3 months. I require an explanation that makes sense, or a credit for a tire. They have spent more man hours avoiding responsibility for this problem than the cost of giving me credit for a tire. I have given Rivian a simple solution to this problem. Come on Rivian, you have a disconnect between a really great product, and really horrible service!
 

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Rivian R1T (Adventure - CR, BM, 21", Ordered 10/5/2021, Delivered 6/24/2022), Suburban 2500, VW ID.4
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I have about 8200 miles on my 21s. 8/32 on the front and 10/32 on the rear. Haven't done a rotation yet. Was also told 9000 miles by the mobile service tech. I was planning to do it at 6k, but have been putting it off waiting for my 20" AT wheel and tire setup to be ready.

Edit: I almost forgot, and for the sake of clarity thought I should add, my rear wheels and tires were replaced at 4k miles due to damage sustained during a tow to the SC. So the rears actually only have about 4k on them.
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh)

It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered...

So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's?

Any suggestions?
I am at Discount Tire in Houston for a rotation on my wife's Mercedes. I asked how much to replace the tires on a Rivian with Perills...I was to depending on size for 4 $2,000 to $2,500 OUCH
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh) It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered... So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's? Any suggestions?
I saw someone else mention this, but curious to know if you drive around in conserve mode other than on long highway road trips? While doing my first mile drive, I heard a story about the manager who drove her Rivian in conserve mode nearly all the time and it wore her front tires twice as quickly as others who didn’t.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I saw someone else mention this, but curious to know if you drive around in conserve mode other than on long highway road trips? While doing my first mile drive, I heard a story about the manager who drove her Rivian in conserve mode nearly all the time and it wore her front tires twice as quickly as others who didn’t.
I don't know about that, but I rarely drive in conserve mode (only the few long road trips we have done). Being that my fronts are wearing out a lot quicker, I wonder if it's the strong regen, and whether I should try to feather it more, planning my braking more rather than letting the strong regen brake as hard? I've learned how to time it correctly so just let off gas and slow down using strong regen. But with 7k lbs and slowing down like that, maybe that's wearing down the tires faster? Or maybe I should drive in standard regen? Any opinions guys?
 

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I don't know about that, but I rarely drive in conserve mode (only the few long road trips we have done). Being that my fronts are wearing out a lot quicker, I wonder if it's the strong regen, and whether I should try to feather it more, planning my braking more rather than letting the strong regen brake as hard? I've learned how to time it correctly so just let off gas and slow down using strong regen. But with 7k lbs and slowing down like that, maybe that's wearing down the tires faster? Or maybe I should drive in standard regen? Any opinions guys?
I use strong regen but I do feather more. I almost never have to use the brake pedal, but I also don't typically need to rely on FULL regen. Feather the throttle!
 

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So I have almost 9k miles on my Rivian and my fronts are already worn to 4 and 5/32 and rears are 7/32 (they are doing tire rotation in a few days - SC previously told me at 7500 it's not needed...doh)

It seems we won't get much life out of these 21's and replacing them with the same ones again since that's the only option available, is a bit annoying. I called Pirelli and they have no mileage warranty on these, so it doesn't matter how fast they wear out, it's not covered...

So I'm wondering, any ideas on what my options are? I mostly drive on the street so I would like to maintain decent efficiency. I could go to 20" AT's, but I don't think they would last much more nor would the price be any better. I've seen people getting custom 20" wheels...I wonder if there are 20" all-season tires that would be similar efficiency as the 21's?

Any suggestions?
Remember, when you increase the diameter of your wheels it affects your speedometer! To make it clear if a car (any car that had 15" wheels) and you increase the diameter to say 20" 1 rotation will get you farther (and use more energy "Drag Coefficient) so besides the tires you've increased the load that the output shaft was designed for and you'll need to have the Speedometer recalibrated! Yes I know what I'm talking about! Here's a 1964 Alfa Romeo 2600 I just finished!
Motor vehicle Machine Gas Space Engineering
 

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Remember, when you increase the diameter of your wheels it affects your speedometer! To make it clear if a car (any car that had 15" wheels) and you increase the diameter to say 20" 1 rotation will get you farther (and use more energy "Drag Coefficient) so besides the tires you've increased the load that the output shaft was designed for and you'll need to have the Speedometer recalibrated! Yes I know what I'm talking about! Here's a 1964 Alfa Romeo 2600 I just finished!
Unfortunately, you do not seem to know what you're talking about. Increasing the wheel size does NOT affect the speddometer, at all.

The overall diameter of the tire DOES affect speedometer... but the wheel size does not.

You can increase from a 15" to a 20" wheel as long as you adjust the tire size to keep the same OD you will not affect the speedometer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Unfortunately, you do not seem to know what you're talking about. Increasing the wheel size does NOT affect the speddometer, at all.

The overall diameter of the tire DOES affect speedometer... but the wheel size does not.

You can increase from a 15" to a 20" wheel as long as you adjust the tire size to keep the same OD you will not affect the speedometer.
Yes, it's the tire size that matters...and I assumed it was implied when I asked about custom 20" wheels...since I don't like these tires to begin with, I had no intention of getting 20" wheels and trying to somehow fit the same 21" tires on it. lol
 

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I don't know about that, but I rarely drive in conserve mode (only the few long road trips we have done). Being that my fronts are wearing out a lot quicker, I wonder if it's the strong regen, and whether I should try to feather it more, planning my braking more rather than letting the strong regen brake as hard? I've learned how to time it correctly so just let off gas and slow down using strong regen. But with 7k lbs and slowing down like that, maybe that's wearing down the tires faster? Or maybe I should drive in standard regen? Any opinions guys?
High regen is fine to drive in, but don't completely jump off the accelerator. Whether it is brakes or regen you are still using the coefficient of friction ("grip") of the tires on the road to slow down. That is wearing away at your tires little by little with every stop, but much faster with higher deceleration. What you are doing is the equivalent of slamming on the brakes at every stop. Gradually lift your foot off the accelerator to slow down more gently and you will for sure see longer tire life. I think the general consensus though is whatever the tire manufacturer has for a warranty, you should half it for an EV, so instead of 10k miles like you are seeing with your current driving style, it would be more like 20-25k with slower stops. Based on what I am seeing on my truck, I don't think that is out of the realm of possibility.
 

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Remember, when you increase the diameter of your wheels it affects your speedometer! To make it clear if a car (any car that had 15" wheels) and you increase the diameter to say 20" 1 rotation will get you farther (and use more energy "Drag Coefficient) so besides the tires you've increased the load that the output shaft was designed for and you'll need to have the Speedometer recalibrated! Yes I know what I'm talking about! Here's a 1964 Alfa Romeo 2600 I just finished! View attachment 9720
On my current truck I run 31” OD in the winter and 34” OD in the summer. My Speedo is off by 3 mph at 65 mph between the two sizes. And <1mph at under 45 mph. If you are OCD yes recalibrate, but it is not at all required.
 

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As with anything on a vehicle, driving habits greatly affect all aspects of operational performance. There is no magic bullet for all vehicles and all drivers in all weather conditions.

And to use the industry term about wheel / tire size combinations...it is called SLR Static Load Radius. This is the radius from a static vehicle, properly loaded from the ground to the center of the hub mounting hole. SLR changes greatly affect performance. SLR is why you can get those "cool looking" 24 inch wheels inside your wheel housings...because you are putting 15 series (sidewall aspect ratio) tires on it. Your vehicle will ride like an ox cart on a wash board road, but these are the vehicle real world tradeoffs we make on a daily basis.
 

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I don't know about that, but I rarely drive in conserve mode (only the few long road trips we have done). Being that my fronts are wearing out a lot quicker, I wonder if it's the strong regen, and whether I should try to feather it more, planning my braking more rather than letting the strong regen brake as hard? I've learned how to time it correctly so just let off gas and slow down using strong regen. But with 7k lbs and slowing down like that, maybe that's wearing down the tires faster? Or maybe I should drive in standard regen? Any opinions guys?
The reason the drive wheel tires wear faster than the non-drive wheel tires, is the torque being applied as you accelerate - however small or little it is - compared to non-drive tires.

In case of Rivian, the significant torque on the demand is being applied to accelerate to the freeway speed, passing another vehicle as well as just stop and go driving in the streets. You don't have to be hard on acceleration, though clearly, harder you accelerate, faster the tire wear. Couple that with heavy weight of the vehicle and you can easily figure out that wear is faster than lower torque and lighter vehicles. Also the conserve mode puts the vehicle in the FWD mode; hence, those that do significant driving in this mode are experiencing front tire wear greater than the rears. Regen braking is applied to all wheels (tires) so it is relatively balanced at all corners (with some differences due to deceleration weight transfer to the front wheels/tires).

Here is a tire size website that you can use to compare different tire options:


For an example, 275/55/21 is essentially the same tire diameter as 305/50/21. The rub is that the tire is significantly wider (by 30mm) so it will require wider rim to maintain similar handling quality (actually will corner better but will reduce range significantly due to higher rolling resistance). Can you put wider tires on the existing rims - probably but not great. So if you have to change wheels, then why stay with 21" where the tire options are very limited.

With all that being said, I changed my wheel selection from 21" to 22" for my R1S configuration. I have no interest of losing as much range as 20" AT. At least there are options for 22" beside the OEM tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
The reason the drive wheel tires wear faster than the non-drive wheel tires, is the torque being applied as you accelerate - however small or little it is - compared to non-drive tires.

In case of Rivian, the significant torque on the demand is being applied to accelerate to the freeway speed, passing another vehicle as well as just stop and go driving in the streets. You don't have to be hard on acceleration, though clearly, harder you accelerate, faster the tire wear. Couple that with heavy weight of the vehicle and you can easily figure out that wear is faster than lower torque and lighter vehicles. Also the conserve mode puts the vehicle in the FWD mode; hence, those that do significant driving in this mode are experiencing front tire wear greater than the rears. Regen braking is applied to all wheels (tires) so it is relatively balanced at all corners (with some differences due to deceleration weight transfer to the front wheels/tires).

Here is a tire size website that you can use to compare different tire options:


For an example, 275/55/21 is essentially the same tire diameter as 305/50/21. The rub is that the tire is significantly wider (by 30mm) so it will require wider rim to maintain similar handling quality (actually will corner better but will reduce range significantly due to higher rolling resistance). Can you put wider tires on the existing rims - probably but not great. So if you have to change wheels, then why stay with 21" where the tire options are very limited.

With all that being said, I changed my wheel selection from 21" to 22" for my R1S configuration. I have no interest of losing as much range as 20" AT. At least there are options for 22" beside the OEM tires.
Thanks. yeah, I think I may sell the wheels once these tires are worn out, and switch to the 22's. And then have a 20" AT set for when the situation calls for it. I also don't want to drive on the 20" AT all the time when 95% of the time I will be on streets
 

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The tire manufacturers are going to need to take a serious look at their product line given the significant increase in vehicle weights on BEV. Tesla owners are experiencing the same thing-- they may not be as big as the Rivian but relative to other small and mid-size sedans their weights are much greater. Tire manufactures have the ability to dial in and pro-long the tread life. Right now they are taking advantage of the consumer while in the honeymoon phase of the EV revolution. I see them expanding the line to greater curb weight and load offerings for premium $ saying you get more miles out of them. Eventually I see this becoming the standard but it will be 5-10 years I imagine before we start to see a reasonable price curve.
 
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